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Need urgent help, no idea what to do.

Tags:
  • Homebuilt
  • Power Supplies
  • PCI Express
  • Systems
Last response: in Systems
July 8, 2012 10:10:10 AM

Before I get started here's my current rig:
Processor: Intel Core 2 Duo 3.0 ghz
Motherboard: Asus P5Q Pro
Ram: 2 Gigabytes of RAM (Kingston).
Graphics Card: Nvidia Geforce 9600gt.
Current Power Supply: Cooler master 460w extreme cooling.

The thing is my old power supply overheated and was damaged beyond repair so I had to go out and buy a new one, I bought the cooler master 460w extreme cooling psu.
I hook everything up and start the computer but it powers on for a split second and then goes off.

So I decided to mess around and during this I removed the 6 pin PCI - E connector from my graphics card and then powered on and everything seemed to work just fine.

And after reconnecting the 6 pin pci e connector I get the same issue, the pc powers on for a split second and goes off again.

Some side info : My power supply is more than enough to handle my PC so kindly do not suggest that I upgrade it.


P.S : The PCI-e connector on the new power supply has 6 rails, one on each pin but the previous power supply had 2 molex cables to a 6 pin PCI e connector and that one only had 5 rails, could it be possible that if I try the molex cables - 6 pin pci e connector on this power supply then my card would start ?

and is there any other way I can fix this ?


More about : urgent idea

a b B Homebuilt system
July 8, 2012 12:26:49 PM

If your old PSU was damaged, there is a chance that your 9600GT was damaged in the process. Is there a friend that can loan you a low end GPU to test it out?
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July 8, 2012 2:12:35 PM

Actually I had a very low end PCI ( Not PCI - E ) card lying around and that worked just fine, still doesn't disprove my hunch that the 6 pin pci-e connector may not be functioning correct,
sadly I don't have any pci-e cards available to test out and most of my friends have laptops.
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July 8, 2012 2:23:21 PM

I would agree that the problem is with the GPU and not the 6 pin pci-e connector on a new ps.
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a c 135 ) Power supply
a b B Homebuilt system
July 8, 2012 2:39:38 PM

look at the 12v plus leg of the power supply. make sure it greater then 8amp. your video card at max voltage will pull 8 amps.
if it is greater then 8 amps then it could be a bad power supply not holding up under load or the video card took a hit.
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July 8, 2012 2:54:18 PM

smorizio said:
look at the 12v plus leg of the power supply. make sure it greater then 8amp. your video card at max voltage will pull 8 amps.
if it is greater then 8 amps then it could be a bad power supply not holding up under load or the video card took a hit.


I'm not experienced with handling hardware as much so I have no idea what you're saying :/ 
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a c 135 ) Power supply
a b B Homebuilt system
July 8, 2012 6:04:26 PM

power supply have a max rating ie 500w. on the side of the ps vendor break down how much of that 500w is on the 3.3v 5v and 12v line. the 12v line powers the cpu and gpu in your case. so if the 12v line says 400w or it in amps like 18amps. take a little math. 18amps time 12v is 216w so on that power supply the cpu and gpu should not pull more then 216 watts. so if it an older cpu rated at 126w you would take 126-216 and your left with about 90w for the video card. video card vendors will say you need a min x size power supply and under that will be the max voltage the card will draw. (Most time it in wattage).
when you build a system you use a power supply tool so that you buy a supply that rated larger then the wattage that is needed. so if the tool was close to 500w you get a 600w ps to give the ps a little room for when it ages. also not all power supply are rated for what there stamped. the low end cheap china ones most times there rebranded 300-500w units. and under load they go boom.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Em4PLzv2zSE
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July 9, 2012 8:05:28 AM

yes the 12v one is 18 amps
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a b B Homebuilt system
July 9, 2012 8:31:31 AM

Keep in mind, an adapter is just wires. Unless the wires themselves fried, it'll work just fine. I'm still thinking your GPU was fried.
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July 9, 2012 8:37:10 AM

I hope to God that it isn't fried since I'm too broke to get a new one right now xD
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a b B Homebuilt system
July 9, 2012 8:44:38 AM

Well that sucks, but what can ya do, eh?

At least if it is, and you can eventually save money, at least you can replace it with a better one. :) 
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July 9, 2012 8:53:32 AM

phyco126 said:
Well that sucks, but what can ya do, eh?

At least if it is, and you can eventually save money, at least you can replace it with a better one. :) 


Ohwell :p 
Thanks for the replies everyone,

I'll keep this topic up for a few more days incase someone has a fix xD
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July 9, 2012 9:00:15 AM

For some reason I look at this and can't seem to think that's it's anything else besides the PSU. I've played around with problems like these on old machines of mine, where all types of problems occur when they try to power up.

Remember that your GPU runs on the 12v rails. If you have multiple rails, they are each deticated to powering a certain part of the system. Hence a part of one of the 12v rails is supplying power to the video card. All I can think up is either your psu is too weak or is damaged in a way. Try to borrow a different psu and test it, maybe a larger one? If that doesn't work, the worst case scenario is that you have a limited edition nvidia paperweight. Btw, try not to use PCI-e adapters, as they can add extra load to the wrong rails, causing the psu to overload. If you must use one, get the double molex to pci-e as there is less load on a single wire.
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July 9, 2012 9:35:11 AM

I'm sure my PSU is more than enough to handle the pc and yeah I'm gonna use a double molex to pci-e, just need to find one.
I'll keep you guys updated.
Thanks for the responses :) 
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