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Whats better? Intel Core i5-2500 or Intel Core i5-2500K?

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July 8, 2012 5:39:31 PM

Was customizing a build on PC Part Picker, whilst choosing CPU I came across the processors.

Intel Core i5-2500

Intel Core i5-2500K

Just wondering what is the DIFFERENCE and which is better?
Thanks.
July 8, 2012 6:03:00 PM

MacaulayRose7 said:
Was customizing a build on PC Part Picker, whilst choosing CPU I came across the processors.

Intel Core i5-2500

Intel Core i5-2500K

Just wondering what is the DIFFERENCE and which is better?
Thanks.

The "K" means that it has an unlocked multiplyer so you can overclock your CPU.
July 8, 2012 6:05:24 PM

logan77 said:
The "K" means that it has an unlocked multiplyer so you can overclock your CPU.

How do you actually 'Overclock' your CPU?
And what happens when you do? Does it make it run faster but does that mean more overheating meaning the change of the fan?
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a b å Intel
July 8, 2012 6:09:28 PM

The K series processors have an unlocked clock multiplier which lets you run them out of specification. While this can offer more performance, it is dangerous and can destroy the product if you do not know what you are doing.

The non-k series processors have additional CPU features which you most likely do not need.
July 8, 2012 6:13:18 PM

What chipset do you have?
As for the cooling, yes it will generate more heat and most of the time, an aftermarket cooler is required. It all depends on how far you go.
July 8, 2012 6:14:19 PM

logan77 said:
What chipset do you have?
As for the cooling, yes it will generate more heat and most of the time, an aftermarket cooler is required. It all depends on how far you go.

Not any at the moment, I am currently still deciding the specific components for my new and first build.
July 8, 2012 6:17:46 PM

In addition to overclocking, I believe that the K version has faster graphics...Intel HD 3000 (instead of Intel HD 2000 on the non-K version).

Dave
July 8, 2012 6:22:51 PM

Overclocking lets the processor run at a faster speed. For example, the i5-2500K comes with a stock speed of 3.3GHz. To overclock, you reboot the computer, and enter the BIOS. Then, you just change the multiplier, which translates into a higher clock speed. You can easily go to 4.5GHz. You do see some performance gains. However, you need specific equipment:

An unlocked CPU(has a K at the end)
A specific motherboard chipset (P67, Z68, Z77, etc.)
Good cooling(Doesn't have to be liquid)

It's fun, and if you follow tutorials closely, and don't deviate, you'll be good. However, if you go crazy and overclock like crazy, you can potentially shorten your CPU's lifespan.
July 8, 2012 6:28:47 PM

obsama1 said:
Overclocking lets the processor run at a faster speed. For example, the i5-2500K comes with a stock speed of 3.3GHz. To overclock, you reboot the computer, and enter the BIOS. Then, you just change the multiplier, which translates into a higher clock speed. You can easily go to 4.5GHz. You do see some performance gains. However, you need specific equipment:

An unlocked CPU(has a K at the end)
A specific motherboard chipset (P67, Z68, Z77, etc.)
Good cooling(Doesn't have to be liquid)

It's fun, and if you follow tutorials closely, and don't deviate, you'll be good. However, if you go crazy and overclock like crazy, you can potentially shorten your CPU's lifespan.

Thank you, very helpful. Is there a place you can send your CPU to get overclocked safely (UK) or does it have to be done on your own PC, and if i ever did overclock it I would be safe and go to 4.0 GHZ or maybe take a safe step each time as I am not the best with Components.
Does the i5 2500K come with a CPU cooler? - http://www.scan.co.uk/products/intel-core-i5-2500k-unlo...

If so, and if you overclocked it to 4.00 ghz then would you need a better CPU Cooler? Thanks.
July 8, 2012 6:33:42 PM

I think if you go to your local PC shop, they might overclock it for you. Both the 2500 and 2500K come with coolers, but they are just OK. OK if you're not overclocking. 4GHz is cake for the 2500K, and VERY easy. I suggest you get a CPU cooler. You can get a good one for about £18. It's the Coolermaster Hyper 212+.
July 8, 2012 6:40:08 PM

obsama1 said:
I think if you go to your local PC shop, they might overclock it for you. Both the 2500 and 2500K come with coolers, but they are just OK. OK if you're not overclocking. 4GHz is cake for the 2500K, and VERY easy. I suggest you get a CPU cooler. You can get a good one for about £18. It's the Coolermaster Hyper 212+.

Thanks a lot mate, As noted before I am new to this sort of stuff, so you are helping me alot. Cheers.
July 8, 2012 7:16:05 PM

No problem.
July 8, 2012 7:18:21 PM

obsama1 said:
No problem.

Why is overclocking to 4.0ghz a peace of cake but 4.5 is not. What do you need to change that is harder.
July 8, 2012 7:20:51 PM

Well, 4.5GHZ is somewhat harder. Every CPU differs in their OC'ing ability. Some CPU's can get to 4.5 just as easily as 4.0. Some require a slight change in voltage.
July 8, 2012 7:31:17 PM

obsama1 said:
Well, 4.5GHZ is somewhat harder. Every CPU differs in their OC'ing ability. Some CPU's can get to 4.5 just as easily as 4.0. Some require a slight change in voltage.

Okay, will overclocking to 4.0 ghz drastically reduce my CPUs life span or damage it.

And since I will need a better CPU fan and you recommended me that Hyper 212+ Coolermaster, does it come with that thermal paste already installed?

http://www.scan.co.uk/products/coolermaster-hyper-212-e...

thats the correct one right?
July 8, 2012 7:36:32 PM

It should come with tube of paste that you apply yourself (follow the directions closely).

Overclocking may shorten the lifespan but it depends on how far you go and whether you leave speedstep on (i.e. running 4.0GHz all the time or letting it idle back to 1.6 when not under load). It also depends on your specific chip since even CPUs with the same model number may react to overclocking a little differently.
July 8, 2012 7:37:27 PM

What do you mean by going back to 1.6, I thought it was 3.3?
a b å Intel
July 8, 2012 7:40:18 PM

MacaulayRose7 said:
What do you mean by going back to 1.6, I thought it was 3.3?


3.3 is the standard operating frequency, 1.6 is the idle frequency. The OS will step it down to 1.6 to save power and reduce heat
July 8, 2012 7:41:36 PM

Pinhedd said:
3.3 is the standard operating frequency, 1.6 is the idle frequency. The OS will step it down to 1.6 to save power and reduce heat

Ahh, I understand. Cheers.
July 9, 2012 12:26:13 AM

Overclocking doesn't damage the CPU, if you don't go crazy and leave it on 4.8GHz all day. 4.0GHz is a good, everyday overclock, and if you have proper cooling for it, it will have little to no impact on your CPU.
July 9, 2012 7:15:57 AM

obsama1 said:
Overclocking doesn't damage the CPU, if you don't go crazy and leave it on 4.8GHz all day. 4.0GHz is a good, everyday overclock, and if you have proper cooling for it, it will have little to no impact on your CPU.

Okay, is it hard to do? And will it be able to handle Flight Sim X? Obviously a better CPU coolers needs to be bought to replacd the standard CPU fan. When I overclock it, do I just need to leave it then or do I need to keep changing thins.
July 9, 2012 1:36:56 PM

Flight Sim X is older so I don't think the CPU would have problems even at stock clocks.

Today, overclocking is so easy a caveman can do it. Press Delete (or whatever you mobo supports) to enter BIOS, leave everything on Auto except the Multiplier, and change that to 40 or so (that means 40 x 100MHz = 4.0 GHz), save and exit. That's it. No need to fiddle with it.

Now, you can keep upping the multiplier until Windows starts crashing then back down one, but that's a risk you have to think about since that means you're at the limits of you chip (short of adding voltage which can shorten the lifespan).

I would recommend at least a cheap cooler like the 212 Evo for any overclocking.
!