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Computer is built, now what?

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  • New Build
  • Computer
  • Systems
Last response: in Systems
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July 9, 2012 1:21:24 PM

Hello I just built my first computer about 2 days ago. I followed the newegg videos and was able to pull it off. The system turns on and works perfectly on the internet and all the basic functions. I want to know how i can test if the parts i got any good under gaming stress. I would normally just start playing but i only have starcraft 2 and i think that game is more cpu heavy. I am really worried about the graphics card because i have read the reviews on newegg and its about 50/50, some ppl get a good card others get a faulty card that crashes under more than normal load. my graphics card is ASUS GTX670-DC2T-2GD5 GeForce GTX 670 2GB 256-bit GDDR5 PCI Express 3.0 x16 HDCP Ready SLI Support Video Card. Also i was wondering if i need to update all of the drivers in the motherboard EX: Bios, Bios-utilities, Lan, USB etc... or just the ones that newegg says?

Thanks for your time i really appreciate it

More about : computer built

July 9, 2012 1:28:51 PM

update all drivers (Windows 7 will usually do most of this for you for most items...install all the optional updates)

you can grab the Unigine Heaven benchmark for free for a GPU workout
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July 9, 2012 1:30:50 PM

ok thx for the quick reply.
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July 9, 2012 2:09:13 PM

1. Use Windows Update first to update the Operating System files....you can have it update drivers but i would strongly advise against it. Can't tell you how many times I have had to reinstall the OS because Windows "got it wrong". For whaetever reason, most of the fails have been with 'audio" drivers.

2. Create a "Download" directory on your Hard Drive, then a sub directory for say "PCDrivers", In there, create a sub directories for each of your hardware components. Example:

C:\Download\PCDrivers\MoBo\

Within there, create subdirectories for say:

Audio
BIOS
BIOS Utilities
ChipSet
LAN
SATA
Utilities
USB
Manual
VGA

and download the respective drivers into each one.

3. "Rinse and Repeat" for other hardware components

4. Install drivers in the order presented in the Hardware Manuals.

I'd recommend keeping several versions of the hardware drivers in these directories as, though rare, sometimes a driver upgrade will cause conflicts and you will have to revert to an older one.

There are several utilities that can help with this effort to keep your system drivers and software on it current.

Secunia PSI - http://secunia.com/vulnerability_scanning/personal/
DriverMax - http://www.drivermax.com/

Again, I use these tools to identify what items are out of date but prefer to manually install updates.

5. As for testing your system, I find that OCCT 4.3.1 provides the most useful tool available. Not only will it torture test your GPU and CPU using several methods, it will display and graph voltages, temperatures, etc throughout the test.

http://www.ocbase.com/index.php/download

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Best solution

July 9, 2012 2:29:10 PM

1. Before you do anything, install an antivirus program. MS security essentials is free and non obtrusive.

2. Get windows up to date on maintenance.

3. Get drivers up to date, and get the drivers from the source web site. Particularly the Nvidia graphics drivers.

4. For testing ram, I use memtest 86+ for a couple of full passes with NO errors should be OK.

5. If you OC, or just want to exercise the cpu, I run prime95 with rounding checking. Run it long enough for the temperatures to reach the maximum and then one hour more. Monitor the temperatures with RealTemp or such.

6. I would not worry too much about the graphics card. It works, or it doesn't. If you want, furmark, or other stressers could be run.

7. Most of the time, a failure during gaming is caused by the game itself. If you get such a failure, see if there is a current patch for the game.
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July 9, 2012 2:31:55 PM

thanks you so much guys for the suggestions
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July 9, 2012 3:59:40 PM

Ok. I will run those programs when i get home. i also have another question regarding temps.

does anyone know what temp would be considered high for a 3570k with a hyper 212 plus

*also if i have not overclocked yet, should i still leave prime95 running for about 8 hours or just 1 to see how hot it gets. Temp is basically what i am conserned with. For this reason i bought the Coolermaster haf xm and bout the two extra 200mm fans so i have the front and side as intake and the two top and back as outtake.
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July 9, 2012 4:28:49 PM

fightclub25 said:
Ok. I will run those programs when i get home. i also have another question regarding temps.

does anyone know what temp would be considered high for a 3570k with a hyper 212 plus


Actally, the 3570K normally runs cool. I might expect idle to be 10-15c over ambient.

If you OC and leave the voltage on auto, you will go to about 4.3 without a big temperature rise. It is only the very high voltages that OC enthusiasts need that causes the rapid rise in temperatures.
TJMAX for the 3570K is 105c. If you run prime95 and see 70-75c, that should be fine.
In actual usage, you will normally be much below that.
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July 9, 2012 4:35:32 PM

geofelt said:
Actally, the 3570K normally runs cool. I might expect idle to be 10-15c over ambient.

If you OC and leave the voltage on auto, you will go to about 4.3 without a big temperature rise. It is only the very high voltages that OC enthusiasts need that causes the rapid rise in temperatures.
TJMAX for the 3570K is 105c. If you run prime95 and see 70-75c, that should be fine.
In actual usage, you will normally be much below that.



Thankyou for that info geofelt. if it gets too hot while doing the test will it shut off to protect itself or will it just burn out? lol its my first system and i just really want to make sure its cool and stable for when i am gaming since i usually spend a good 4-6 hrs at a time gaming.
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July 9, 2012 4:49:01 PM

fightclub25 said:
Thankyou for that info geofelt. if it gets too hot while doing the test will it shut off to protect itself or will it just burn out? lol its my first system and i just really want to make sure its cool and stable for when i am gaming since i usually spend a good 4-6 hrs at a time gaming.


Not to worry. The cpu will downclock itself if need be, and shut down if it absolutely must. Run CPU-Z while testing, and check the multiplier.
It should normally stay at max.

When gaming, it is the graphics card, more than the cpu that will get stressed.
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July 9, 2012 5:00:38 PM

oh ok. also i dont know if you saw the previous message because i think i edit it after you answered me, but basically since i have not overclocked should i still run prime 95 and OCCT 4.3.1 for 8-10 hrs or do i just leave it running for one since i just want to check temps on cpu and stability on gpu. once again thx
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July 9, 2012 5:12:14 PM

No need for excessive testing,
or even any more testing at all.

Just check your temperatures to verify that your cpu cooler is doing it's job under normal operations.
If the cooler is mismounted,( a common occurence with the intel stock cooler), your idle temperatures will be high.

Otherwise, just run your games and enjoy.

If you should happen to uncover a problem, then you can test the suspect component.

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July 9, 2012 5:21:52 PM

thank you for all your help and info. you have been of great help.
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July 9, 2012 5:23:45 PM

Best answer selected by fightclub25.
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