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3570K, won't go past 4.7GHZ without overheating

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November 22, 2012 1:01:38 PM

Hello, I always seem to get great advice here so I have another question for people overclocking with the i5 3570K and anyone who has been able to go past 4.7 GHz, still boot and not overheat, because I cannot seem to.

Up to 4.7GHz everything is fine, I can boot, and the system is stable and I am only at 1.384V according to CPU-Z Hardware monitor, the VCore is set to1.375. I am running in the mid 60 degrees C during stress testing. I am on a custom liquid cooling system and have been able to push the voltage up to around 1.450V before my temps hit 90 C, but even there I cannot boot up or maintain any stability past 4.7GHz. One thing I noticed is when I set the voltage to 1.45V, the actual is much higher 1.56V and I get warning messages. This may be due to my the load line calibration set to ultra high.

Does anyone have any advice or do you think that this is the limit of my CPU? I have been through some guides and have not found anything useful, the BSOD codes are usually telling me to increase voltage.

i5 3750K
Asus Sabertooth Z77
16 GB Ripjaws X 2133
256Gb OCZ Vertex 4
Corsair Pro Series 850 Watts
2 x MSI GTX670
Silverstone Raven 02-USB3.0
Apogee Drive II w/Black Ice GT Exteme Dual 120mm
XCPS D5 Laing w/EK VGA waterblocks and Dual 140mm Black Ice GT Extereme

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November 22, 2012 1:04:26 PM

If your voltage is that high then you should expect to overheat. That's pretty dangerous for your chip.

If you absolutely need that much voltage to be stable then it's your limit. Have you tried using offset voltages as opposed to fixed?
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November 22, 2012 3:00:15 PM

I have not actually overheated, I came close one, but like I said the voltage was set at about 1.45 or so, I do not remember exactly and it was during an OCCT stress test. I have a fairly high end liquid cooling system and it would appear to be able to handle the heat. I am also using the Antec Formula 7 nano, which I feel is one of the best TIM's on the market, if you can get past the fact that it is a real pain in the ass to apply.

Anyhow, I tried using offset voltages and now I am able to get to 4.8GHz, boot and stable. I had to drop the load line calibration to medium/low or I get a high voltage waring or 1.552VDC but still it is not very hot around 65 C in stress test.
I was under the impression, that I needed to manually input the voltage in order to get a high OC. 4.8GHz seems to be the max frequency of this chip. Its too bad because, thermally, I feel like I have a lot more room.

Thanks for the help! If anyone else out there has another suggestion I am happy to try it.
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a b à CPUs
November 23, 2012 6:05:38 AM

andreme1 said:
I have not actually overheated, I came close one, but like I said the voltage was set at about 1.45 or so, I do not remember exactly and it was during an OCCT stress test. I have a fairly high end liquid cooling system and it would appear to be able to handle the heat. I am also using the Antec Formula 7 nano, which I feel is one of the best TIM's on the market, if you can get past the fact that it is a real pain in the ass to apply.

Anyhow, I tried using offset voltages and now I am able to get to 4.8GHz, boot and stable. I had to drop the load line calibration to medium/low or I get a high voltage waring or 1.552VDC but still it is not very hot around 65 C in stress test.
I was under the impression, that I needed to manually input the voltage in order to get a high OC. 4.8GHz seems to be the max frequency of this chip. Its too bad because, thermally, I feel like I have a lot more room.

Thanks for the help! If anyone else out there has another suggestion I am happy to try it.


If with 4.8 your only hitting mid 60's at that voltage then your cooling is great but I would say not to put the voltage any higher or your chip might not last too long.

That's probably your limit but it's hardly a bad overclock being about the same as sandy at about 5ghz.
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