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Graphics Card for Gaming best for Video Editing?

Last response: in Graphics & Displays
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May 20, 2012 11:31:34 PM

Hi All
I'm ordering parts for a new computer that I am building from scratch.
I will be using Ivy Bridge for the CPU and trying to include the best of the best for this project.
I am wondering as I do a lot of Multimedia development and Flash Programming, MySQL, Photoshop etc.
Would the best Graphics Card for Gaming also be the best for Video Editing?
I am trying to find what is the best/most versatile graphics card for 2012 - and wonder if its great for gaming will it be great
for development too?
Thanks Steve
a b U Graphics card
May 21, 2012 12:17:34 AM

Unless you're going to do some 3D design, a gaming card will be good for video editing. nvidia has stable cards and cuda which will help with that. Whats your budget and also are you going to do some gaming? Heres a great card for gaming just under 140 dollars.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
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a b U Graphics card
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May 21, 2012 1:22:12 AM

Video editing actually does not task video card heavily, as long as it's not 3D work as already mentioned above. Any modern low-mid range gaming card will work fine for video editing. I tend to lean towards nvidia for Photoshop work. Video editing work is highly dependent on your processor- you want a fast quad at least, 8gig of memory, or even maybe 16 since its not expensive anymore.
A fast hard drive is also a big plus. An SSD will amaze you if you can budget it in.
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May 21, 2012 1:50:15 AM

in order of the programs which you said here is how they tax your computer the most
for CPU
MySQL, Flash then Photoshop
for GPU
Flash Photoshop the MySQL
for RAM
MySQL, Photoshop then Flash
Video RAM
Flash, Photoshop, MySQL

in my expenice anything which can run Flash SDK effively will be able to do MySQL excellent same with photoshop

get a quad core CPU the faster it is the less time it will take to render your flash projects, a graphics card with at least 1GB of video RAM as you will need it in some of your Flash renders if you do that while runing another video editing program especially, at least 8GB i would suggest slightly higher then that like 12-16GB maybe, and do not overclock the CPU btw as it will decrease the life span and stablity in Video and Photo editing you want stability under heavy loads but the Z77 chipset is more stable so i would suggest that one, as said above a SSD will speed it up but having a RAM drive on fast DDR3 making the RAM drive around 4GB in size will cut out some of the problems in latency just remember to save to a HDD or a SSD before shutting it down also store the OS on the SSD SATA 6Gbps is actually effective on SSDs though not at all on HDDs
A good Graphics card would be either a 500 series GeForce card or a HD 7000 series Card
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May 21, 2012 1:55:53 AM

Actually that was true years ago.
Premiere has it's mercury gpu accelerated engine which only relies on quadro gpus (you can enable any nvidia card by modifying a txt file though) and REALLY helps having multiple hd streams and effects rendered in realtime. Same goes for hardware accelerated render and compression of the exported movie, really faster.
For the SSD... unuseful it will only boost your startup times.
You have to look for a BIG hdd since it will get full in a snap when dealing with videos. You can also look for a 4 - 5 bay NAS in raid, you will get LOTS of bandwidth, you can store huge amounts of data and you get redundancy.

Since 6xx cards lacks in gpgpu performance I would suggest a Nvidia 570gtx.
Bye ^_^
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a b U Graphics card
a b 4 Gaming
May 21, 2012 2:01:29 AM

Blazer1985 said:

For the SSD... unuseful it will only boost your startup times.


You have apparently never used a machine with an SSD, have you?
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May 21, 2012 2:18:41 AM

Please don't get the 550 ti! Go for a 460 or 560ti if you can stretch the budget, you'll get better performance from either over the 550ti.
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a b U Graphics card
May 21, 2012 2:37:19 AM

termhn said:
Please don't get the 550 ti! Go for a 460 or 560ti if you can stretch the budget, you'll get better performance from either over the 550ti.

Unless he wants to game he should get a 1gb card (my choice would be nvidia) and that should be enough for what hes doing and spend the money on a good processor. I would suggest an Ivy Bridge because they have Quick Sync. As jitpublisher said he could also get more ram since it helps alot when using video editing programs.
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May 21, 2012 2:39:15 AM

If you use the ssd only for the system and programs then you will only reduce startup times. If you use terabytes of redundant SSDs for archiving and working with videos... You're a billionaire, good for you, go get Steve a nice pc :-)
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a b U Graphics card
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May 21, 2012 12:03:20 PM

Blazer1985 said:
If you use the ssd only for the system and programs then you will only reduce startup times. If you use terabytes of redundant SSDs for archiving and working with videos... You're a billionaire, good for you, go get Steve a nice pc :-)


That is what I thought, you have never had the pleasure of working on a PC with an SSD. I don't think the OP is talking about terabytes of videos. However, where you choose to store them, and where you choose to work with them can be two different places, and yes an SSD lends to quick start up times, but that is only the tip of the iceberg. A single SSD can have very nearly the throughput of a RAID 5 array, and 10 times less latency.
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May 22, 2012 3:43:42 AM

jitpublisher said:
Video editing actually does not task video card heavily, as long as it's not 3D work as already mentioned above. Any modern low-mid range gaming card will work fine for video editing. I tend to lean towards nvidia for Photoshop work. Video editing work is highly dependent on your processor- you want a fast quad at least, 8gig of memory, or even maybe 16 since its not expensive anymore.
A fast hard drive is also a big plus. An SSD will amaze you if you can budget it in.

Yes I have the Ivy Bridge CPU that I am going with but want everything else to be at about that level of performance.
I may be rendering 3D in the future - . The PC I have in mind is going to be built around the use
of a Ivy Bridge from Intel - I been looking at various motherboards as well. I am always concerned about price but this time around, I'm just trying to get the best of the best and bite the bullet - as I see it... the time saved working with a top system justifies the cost :) 
SSD - I have been hearing about for a about 6 months....So with a SSD with some of the following components I should have a good start.

Ivy Bridge
Reviews:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

MotherBoard:
http://www.squidoo.com/ivy-bridge-motherboard#module158...
*Not Set on a Graphics Card yet..I'd like the best as I'm not sure what I'll be doing in a year or two with the machine:
Graphics Card
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
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May 22, 2012 4:19:48 AM

If you plan on 3D rendering then nvidia is the way to go. It has cuda which some renderers such as octane use, this is basically way faster than using the cpu. A gtx 470 or a gtx 560 Ti should do for this. The processor is still mostly used for most renderers and the one you've chosen is a very good one. The mobo is also very good.
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August 19, 2012 3:10:17 AM

Answering the part which no one else seemed to of "wonder if its great for gaming will it be great for development too?" - rottwyler a.k.a the original question asker. In short no video cards made for gaming have a different BIOS chip then video cards made for video and photo development. In that development cards also usually cost more to buy a card of the same amount of RAM and GPU quality for gaming as if you just straight out buy a gaming card, not to say they cant just saying they are not as good at gaming. Now in reverse a gaming card is not good at rendering for videos like when they are rendering a animation video into the file format for DVD's and Blu-ray discs not as sure on the play back of it but i assume it is also better with the development card. Photo editing will be better with the development card as more graphics RAM and better OpenCL support usually combined with DirectCompute support but not always. In higher end development graphics cards you have up to 3x the amount of graphics RAM as in a gaming card. OpenGL support is the newest version ATI or nVidia either way it will be the newest version as of when it was released.
Games usually use more of both the CPU+GPU programming and not solly GPU programming as you can make Photoshop do with an add-on for using OpenCL instead of using the CPU in order to accomplish this. So for playing games i would suggest a 5xx series GeForce card as i have heard of glitches in game programming related to only the Kepler but not the older GPU core arrangement though not sure if it is all fixed or not. If you are more into using an ATI/AMD graphics card then i would suggest an 65xx/69xx or 75xx/79xx HD card.
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