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FIRST GAMING COMP BUILD: Will these parts go together?

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July 16, 2012 4:28:54 AM

Hi, I am new to building computers and I am currently about to make my first computer build.
Here is a list of components I wish to use in the computer:

CPU: Intel Core i5 2500K Processor 3.3 GHz 4 Core LGA 1155

GPU: EVGA GeForce GTX 560 1024 MB GDDR5 PCI Express 2.0 2DVI/Mini-HDMI SLI Ready

Mobo: ASUS P8P67 LGA 1155 SATA 6Gbps and USB 3.0 Supported Intel P67 DDR3 2400 ATX Motherboard

PSU: CORSAIR Enthusiast Series TX750 V2 750W ATX 12V 80 PLUS BRONZE Certified Active PFC High Performance Power Supply

Case: NZXT Guardian Black SECC Steel Chassis ATX Mid Tower Case

RAM: Kingston HyperX 12GB Kit (3x4GB Modules) 1600MHz DDR3 DIMM Desktop Memory

HDD: 1 TB


So will these components work well together without overheating or problems like that? And is the i5 cpu good enough for the gtx 560? or is it bottlenecked? Please give opinions/answers to these questions so I can make the right build without screwing it up LOL.

The computer is for gaming. My budget for the build is around 900-1100 range (I've already roughly calculated it to be around 1020 dollars or something around that price range)
July 16, 2012 4:30:12 AM

Hard to say without a budget and intended usage.
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July 16, 2012 4:33:48 AM

azeem40 said:
Hard to say without a budget and intended usage.


I'm gonna game with it lol and my budget is really around 1000 or less, but I want to play alot of the modern games without having to upgrade the graphics for at least a while.
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July 16, 2012 4:38:23 AM

Anything you don't need? Like KB/Mouse/OS/Monitor?
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July 16, 2012 4:42:35 AM

azeem40 said:
Anything you don't need? Like KB/Mouse/OS/Monitor?



Oh yeah lol, I didn't think that part would be too important LOL.

KB: Standard dell kb lol nothing special.

Mouse: Don't need one :p 

OS: Windows 7

Monitor: Viewsonic VX2450WM-LED 24-Inch (23.6-Inch Vis) Widescreen LED Monitor with Full HD 1080p and Speakers - Black







I'm just a tad bit iffy on the monitor; will it be good enough for those modern games? My guess is yes most likely but I'm not sure because it has kind of a cheap price...
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July 16, 2012 4:45:04 AM

I don't mean to be rude or anything lol, but will the cpu gpu and whatnot go well together with the motherboard I selected? that is my biggest concern. Also, will any of those parts have a chance of overheating or screwing up with the other parts? Basically what I'm trying to say that is it a jigsaw puzzle that fits all together or no?
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July 16, 2012 5:04:07 AM

I don't see how that is rude, but no, it shouldn't.
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July 16, 2012 5:28:24 AM

Yes, those parts should work but I have a lot of suggestions.

The 750Watt power supply is way overkill for a GTX560. You could save some money by going with a 600 to 650Watt model. Trust me, 600 to 650 is way more than enough power for that set up.

The chipset on the motherboard is outdated. I would recommend a Z77 motherboard. With that you can accomplish several things:
1. Save yourself a bunch of money by going to dual channel ram dropping from 12GB to 8GB.
2. You can go with the current Ivy Bridge processor technology
3. You can take advantage of PCI Express 3.0 instead of 2.0.

With the savings I think you could get a stronger and more power efficient video card from the current generation.

I would aim for an HD7850 which is significantly stronger than a GTX560 and is a PCI Express 3.0 card.

Questions:
How soon are you looking to build?
What resolution of monitor(s) are you planning to use?
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July 16, 2012 5:53:06 AM

rwayne said:
Yes, those parts should work but I have a lot of suggestions.

The 750Watt power supply is way overkill for a GTX560. You could save some money by going with a 600 to 650Watt model. Trust me, 600 to 650 is way more than enough power for that set up.

The chipset on the motherboard is outdated. I would recommend a Z77 motherboard. With that you can accomplish several things:
1. Save yourself a bunch of money by going to dual channel ram dropping from 12GB to 8GB.
2. You can go with the current Ivy Bridge processor technology
3. You can take advantage of PCI Express 3.0 instead of 2.0.

With the savings I think you could get a stronger and more power efficient video card from the current generation.

I would aim for an HD7850 which is significantly stronger than a GTX560 and is a PCI Express 3.0 card.

Questions:
How soon are you looking to build?
What resolution of monitor(s) are you planning to use?


Is the HD7850 cheaper or same price as the gtx 560? I mainly went with the Nvidia because I am more familiar with their product levels and which ones are more powerful or less powerful, but I am totally willing to go with the HD7850 as long as it will be ok with the cpu, as I have heard from my friend that he has problems with his really nice amd gpu because he uses it with an intel i5 cpu. But then again its a laptop he's using XD
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July 16, 2012 10:45:27 PM

The HD7850 is around $220 mark. Yes, it is more than the GTX560 but I am sure you can make up for it in cost savings. Right now Nvidia does not have any competitive products in the midrange market. This will soon be filled with the introduction of the GTX660 and GTX660ti which will most likely come in August and September.

The current generation of AMD cards are known as the HD7000 series.

The H7900 series being the enthusiast line, the 7800 being the midrange line, and the 7700 being a step below that.
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July 16, 2012 10:56:41 PM

Try this:


LITE-ON 24X DVD Writer - Bulk - Black SATA Model iHAS224-06 LightScribe Support - OEM
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
Item #: N82E16827106333
-$3.00 Instant
$22.99
$19.99


IN WIN MANA134 Black SEEC Steel ATX Mid Tower Computer Case
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
Item #: N82E16811108407
-$20.00 Instant
$74.99
$54.99


Western Digital Caviar Blue WD10EZEX 1TB 7200 RPM SATA 6.0Gb/s 3.5" Internal Hard Drive -Bare Drive
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
Item #: N82E16822236339
-$10.00 Instant
$109.99
$99.99


XFX Core Edition FX-785A-ZNFC Radeon HD 7850 1GB 256-bit GDDR5 PCI Express 3.0 CrossFireX Support Video Card
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
Item #: N82E16814150617
$20.00 Mail-in Rebate Card
$234.99


CORSAIR Builder Series CX600 V2 600W ATX12V v2.3 80 PLUS Certified Active PFC Power Supply
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
Item #: N82E16817139028
-$10.00 Instant
$10.00 Mail-in Rebate Card
$79.99
$69.99


G.SKILL Ripjaws X Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1333 (PC3 10666) Desktop Memory Model
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
Item #: N82E16820231426
$43.99


Intel Core i5-3570K Ivy Bridge 3.4GHz (3.8GHz Turbo) LGA 1155 77W Quad-Core Desktop Processor
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
Item #: N82E16819116504
Return Policy: CPU Replacement Only Return Policy
Protect Your Investment (expand for options)
$229.99


COOLER MASTER Hyper 212 Plus RR-B10-212P-G1 "Heatpipe Direct Contact" Long Life Sleeve 120mm CPU Cooler
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
Item #: N82E16835103065
$10.00 Mail-in Rebate
$29.99


ASRock Z77 Extreme4 LGA 1155 Intel Z77 HDMI SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX Intel Motherboard
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
Item #: N82E16813157293
$124.99

Total before rebates: $908.91
$40 of rebates available.

If you wanted to max out the gaming performance of this rig you probably have enough room in your budget to go for a Nvidia GTX 670 which is significantly faster than the 7850.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

But anyhow this just gives you an example.
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July 16, 2012 11:04:13 PM

i like rwayne's build

but would add on an ssd.
Anyone spending the cash to make a new custom build should be considering ssd as a no-brainer. You could also then switch to a 1.5 or 2TB "green" slower speed HDD so bigger for the same price.

also, "if" you were set to buy an aftermarket cooler such as the 212-plus, just get the 212-evo for $10 more. New and improved is always good. $10 shouldn't destroy your budget
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July 16, 2012 11:04:41 PM

i am surprised no one pointed out you had a dual channel motherboard originally and yet 3 sticks of ram
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July 16, 2012 11:53:48 PM

skaggy said:
i am surprised no one pointed out you had a dual channel motherboard originally and yet 3 sticks of ram


Sorry to be a newbie, but what does that exactly mean?

Oh and another thing. Will the standard CPU heat sink keep the cpu cool or do I need to invest in another heatsink?

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July 17, 2012 2:25:40 AM

Some motherboards (not many) require triple channel ram which means they must be installed in threes. The most common configuration is 6GB of ram in a 3 x 2GB set up

Dual channel these days tends to be more popular. As you can imagine they are installed in pairs and the most common config is 8GB of ram. 2 x 4GB

I did not catch this originally as there was no hyperlink back to the motherboard's retailer / manufacturer

A standard CPU cooler should be good if you don't overclock. Personally I don't like fooling with them as they:
1.) at times are harder to install.
2.) Don't look very good
3.) Don't cool as well
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July 17, 2012 9:14:00 PM

rwayne said:
Some motherboards (not many) require triple channel ram which means they must be installed in threes. The most common configuration is 6GB of ram in a 3 x 2GB set up

Dual channel these days tends to be more popular. As you can imagine they are installed in pairs and the most common config is 8GB of ram. 2 x 4GB

I did not catch this originally as there was no hyperlink back to the motherboard's retailer / manufacturer

A standard CPU cooler should be good if you don't overclock. Personally I don't like fooling with them as they:
1.) at times are harder to install.
2.) Don't look very good
3.) Don't cool as well


Ah, thanks for the clarification with the dual channel and triple channel; really helped.

Wait, and what don't you like fooling with? The standard cooler or a different one?
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July 17, 2012 10:40:31 PM

The standard cooler. Don't get me wrong there are some bad aftermarket ones too but you can read the reviews to determine that.

Cooler Master, Zalman, and Arctic Cooling typically make good ones.

I use nothing but after market coolers.
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