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Gaming PC for under $700?

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July 16, 2012 3:35:47 PM

This is my first build! I'm basically checking if my current build will last me 5-6 years. My biggest concern is not being able to run games properly over the next 5 years and on. Please do not hesitate to suggest parts that may be an upgrade but try to keep the total difference in price under $80. Please point out any shortcomings I may have too with the build im considering.

The build I'm considering: (I do not need a monitor or another copy of Windows)
APEVIA X-PLORER2 Series X-PLORER2-BK Black Steel ATX Mid Tower Computer Case
(http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...)

Western Digital Caviar Blue WD3200AAKX 320GB 7200 RPM 16MB Cache SATA 6.0Gb/s 3.5" Internal Hard Drive -Bare Drive
(http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...)

ASUS M5A97 AM3+ AMD 970 SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX AMD Motherboard with UEFI BIOS
(http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...)

EVGA 01G-P3-1460-KR GeForce GTX 560 (Fermi) 1GB 256-bit GDDR5 PCI Express 2.0 x16 HDCP Ready SLI Support Video Card
(http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...)

Antec BP550 Plus 550W Continuous Power ATX12V V2.2 80 PLUS Certified Modular Active PFC Power Supply
(http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...)

G.SKILL Ripjaws Series 4GB (2 x 2GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Desktop Memory Model F3-12800CL9D-4GBRL -- I'm getting 4 total sticks!
(http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...)


AMD Phenom II X4 965 Black Edition Deneb 3.4GHz Socket AM3 125W Quad-Core Processor HDZ965FBGMBOX

(http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...)

So to recap, I'm getting 4 sticks of 2 GB DDR3 RAM because I have heard that it's better to "fill up" both channels instead of just using one channel of 2 sticks of 4 GB DDR3 RAM. Is this true?

Also, I'm assuming that 1600 RAM speed isn't that much of a difference between 1866, if so, is it significant enough to upgrade and spend the extra cash? Also, after doing some reading here, there's a way to OC that 1600 RAM speed?

Furthermore, I've decided on the Phenom II X4 965 BE because of it's price. I'm not sure if this is true, but my logic is that the bottle neck on the computer won't be the processor, but the graphics card. So I figure that the Phenom can handle games over the next 5 years or more, since games tend to be more graphics intensive. I am considering adding an additional 70-80$ to the build by switching out the Phenom for the i5-2130 instead and trying to find equivalent priced MOBO that supports the L1155.

Lastly, I believe the only thing this build is missing is a CD drive, I will be using an old one for this build. Also, I've seen some people getting power cords? Do I need one?

Thanks!

PS - I'm also considering using a SSD hard drive in addition to a regular 7200 RPM hard drive, but that would bump up the cost hugely. Any ideas on a good combo of a small SSD drive and a bigger but smaller than 300 GB hard drive? Maybe if we could keep the total cost of the two under $130 I might be able to make it work?

More about : gaming 700

July 16, 2012 3:50:44 PM

After some rebates, and some specials the system in my sig was $640. Pretty sure those exact items probably have changed prices in the last month, but you should be able to build an Intel i5 processor with a HD 6870 system for under $700.

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a c 118 B Homebuilt system
July 16, 2012 4:39:33 PM

5 years is a lot to ask for for a gaming rig, at least running them at maxed settings with a $700 budget. However, that computer as configured should be able to give you a good 3 or 4 years of decent gaming performance.

I'd make a couple changes to it:

Better capacity hard drive
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

My advice is on your budget to forget about an SSD. The cost per gigabyte is too high to comfortably work a decent capacity one into your budget, and its not going to improve your gaming performance, merely it will reduce the load times. Add one later on if you want.

Quote:
Furthermore, I've decided on the Phenom II X4 965 BE because of it's price. I'm not sure if this is true, but my logic is that the bottle neck on the computer won't be the processor, but the graphics card.

That is correct in most cases. There are a handful of games on the market that are CPU intensive, however based on benchmarks in these few games, they are still completely playable at high settings. The Phenom II 965 is currently very nicely priced. Although again, depending on your expectations as far as game quality, 5 years is a lot to ask for any CPU really.

Quote:
I am considering adding an additional 70-80$ to the build by switching out the Phenom for the i5-2130 instead and trying to find equivalent priced MOBO that supports the L1155.

The 2130 is a dual core i3, not a quad core i5. The cheapest quad core i5 that Intel has is the i5-2300, I have one, its clocked at 2.8GHZ, Cinebench actually ranks my Phenom II @4.0GHZ higher than an i5-2300 @ 2.8. At bare minimum if you want an i5, get at least a 2400, that extra clock speed can do you some good. Besides, i5-2400s are clocked 300mhz higher and cost only 10 dollars more.

As far as the RAM sticks, you're better off getting 2 4GB sticks, honestly. Theres no advantage to getting 4 2GB modules, and its a few bucks cheaper.
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

As far as the RAM speed, both Sandy Bridge and Phenom IIs will run them by default at 1333mhz. Sandy Bridge CPUs have almost no tolerance for overclocking at the reference clock, but the RAM can be overclocked via "Extreme Memory Profile" on motherboards that support it. Phenom IIs can tolerate reference clock overclocking (when you overclock a CPU at the reference clock, you're also overclocking the RAM), for example I have mine overclocked at the reference clock to 4.0, with that OC my 1600mhz rated RAM is running at 1485mhz. The RAM speed on the module is the maximum speed the maker guarantees the RAM will run stable at, not what it will necessarily be running at in a system.

As far as the video card is concerned, my advice would be to get a 6870 over the 560 (non-TI), although better yet, a 7850 if you can find a way to swing it into the budget. In truth, despite the fact that i5s are better CPUs than Phenom IIs, as you pointed out accurately, the most often limiting factor for gaming is the video card, which means a Phenom II w/7850 more often than not is going to game better than an i5 w/6870 video card.

7850 video card, $210 with mail in rebate:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Save a couple bucks on the power supply:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Quote:
Lastly, I believe the only thing this build is missing is a CD drive, I will be using an old one for this build. Also, I've seen some people getting power cords? Do I need one?


Some Antec Earthwatt models do not include power cords for the Power supply to the wall. Most PSUs do, including the one I recommended to you to replace it. Other than that, you should have no need to buy any other cables or adapters for your system as configured. As far as a CD drive, a DVD-RW is less than 20 bucks, as long as you get a Sony, Lite-on, LG or Asus, really hard to screw that up. Make sure the one you're re-using is a SATA, and not an older IDE.
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a c 118 B Homebuilt system
July 16, 2012 4:45:31 PM

Just in case anyone thinks I'm BS'ing about the i5-2300.. Here it is:



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a c 118 B Homebuilt system
July 16, 2012 5:04:40 PM

quilciri said:
Do you live near a microcenter? locations at the top.
http://www.microcenter.com/

http://www.microcenter.com/single_product_results.phtml...
Yea, MicroCenter has great deals on CPUs but they're In-Store only, (don't forget Sales Tax gets added to the price) although their selection for motherboards, at least from what I've seen sucks. But if you can grab an Intel i5 from em heres a good mobo to go with it:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
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July 16, 2012 8:18:23 PM

Thanks for the responses! I would like to take your advice on the Radeon 6870 or even the 7850, but my friend is standing behind the EVGA Geforce GTX 560. I like the 7850 because for $30 more I get 2GB of memory vs the 1 GB on the Geforce. I think that would make a huge difference. However, I don't know anything about MSi, are they a reliable brand?
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a c 118 B Homebuilt system
July 16, 2012 8:37:48 PM

MSI makes decent video cards yes... They used to make really good motherboards too, but lately it seems their mobo quality is questionable.

I understand the brand loyalty thing. I bought a 550 TI factory overclocked myself out of brand loyalty to Nvidia. You cant really go wrong here, but the simple fact is AMD does have better video cards in the low-mid level market currently. Not only does the 7850 beat the 560 TI at stock speeds, the 7850 also overclocks well enough to give a GTX 570 a run for its money. (40% overclock on 7850s is not unheard of)

560 TI vs 7850
http://www.anandtech.com/bench/Product/549?vs=547

560 (non TI) vs 7850
http://www.anandtech.com/bench/Product/543?vs=549

Stock to stock 570 against 7850
http://www.anandtech.com/bench/Product/549?vs=518
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July 16, 2012 9:17:06 PM

nekulturny said:
MSI makes decent video cards yes... They used to make really good motherboards too, but lately it seems their mobo quality is questionable.

I understand the brand loyalty thing. I bought a 550 TI factory overclocked myself out of brand loyalty to Nvidia. You cant really go wrong here, but the simple fact is AMD does have better video cards in the low-mid level market currently. Not only does the 7850 beat the 560 TI at stock speeds, the 7850 also overclocks well enough to give a GTX 570 a run for its money. (40% overclock on 7850s is not unheard of)

560 TI vs 7850
http://www.anandtech.com/bench/Product/549?vs=547

560 (non TI) vs 7850
http://www.anandtech.com/bench/Product/543?vs=549

Stock to stock 570 against 7850
http://www.anandtech.com/bench/Product/549?vs=518



Yeah, I saw those tests actually. The 7850 beats the 560 (non-TI) in almost everything, and for $30 more it's quite the deal. I'm sure my friend will be hurt that I didn't go with EVGA and Nvidia but I think the 7850 is more bang for the buck.

Also, for the exact same price, the Radeon 6870 beats the Geforce GTX 560 (non-TI) in a majority of the categories too.

My friend's argument is that it doesn't say what the other hardware components are that they are running. I would imagine they are the exact same, but he says even if they were, somehow it matters what it is.... or something like that...

I've been reading the reviews on MSI's graphics card and it doesn't seem to get as many good reviews as EVGA's Geforce GTX 560 (non-TI). I'm worried if I do end up going with that MSi one and it melts or something, I'll never hear the end of the I-told-you-so's lol. Have you had good experiences with MSI?

Regarding overclocking, is my mobo a good one for that? I may a little, but I'm a little wary since I haven't planned on adding extra cooling or anything. I may just save the overclocking for another day when I can get a better cooler in there to be safe.
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July 16, 2012 9:18:05 PM

I have 2 msi 560s in sli. I like em, but one alone is meh.

6950 or 480 at around 200ish.

7850 or 570 at around 240 ish

Now that the 570 is hitting the 230 range the go to recommendation of a 7850 can be changed to include a 570:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
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a c 118 B Homebuilt system
July 16, 2012 9:24:44 PM

Quote:

My friend's argument is that it doesn't say what the other hardware components are that they are running. I would imagine they are the exact same, but he says even if they were, somehow it matters what it is.... or something like that...


They also don't show you what driver versions they're running on that. But I can tell you, as a general rule if they're trying to test the video card, they're almost certainly going to use a very powerful CPU as to not introduce a bottleneck in the CPU that would skewer the results. The same would go if they're going to test CPUs to see which perform better, they'll use a very powerful video card and run their benches at high resolutions to see at what point the CPU starts to crumble under the pressure.

EVGA is probably the best manufacturer of Nvidia cards, I'd argue Zotac is pretty good too. For AMD, Sapphire is probably one of the best. If you want, I can recommend a 7850 in the Sapphire flavor if you prefer.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

The motherboard you have chosen is decent for overclocking yes. As far as extra cooling, on a stock cooler, I would not expect to get more than 3.7GHZ out of a Phenom II. (I use that number as the Phenom II 980 model is the same as the 965 its just clocked higher @ 3.7, and both models ship with the same cooler)

AS far as an aftermarket cooler thats a little better, a coolerMaster 212 Evo is a very good CPU cooler. Although Phenom IIs tend to top out at 4.0-4.4GHZ typically, but every CPU is different.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

And the good thing is, these coolers work with both Intel and AMD CPUs.
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July 16, 2012 10:11:58 PM

newegg (note combos) Just an draft of a 700 build that has a good cpu/gpu....I'd work a bit more on the mobo but here it a sample

1

LG DVD Burner Black SATA Model GH24NS90 - OEM
Item #: N82E16827136247
Return Policy: Standard Return Policy


$16.99
1

Rosewill Blackbone Black Steel / Plastic ATX Mid Tower Computer Case
Item #: N82E16811147023
Return Policy: Standard Return Policy
-$10.00 Instant


$49.99
$39.99
1

Western Digital Caviar Blue WD5000AAKX 500GB 7200 RPM SATA 6.0Gb/s 3.5" Internal Hard Drive -Bare Drive
Item #: N82E16822136769
Return Policy: Standard Return Policy
-$15.00 Instant


$84.99
$69.99
1

EVGA 015-P3-1480-KR GeForce GTX 480 (Fermi) 1536MB 384-bit GDDR5 PCI Express 2.0 x16 HDCP Ready SLI Support Video Card
Item #: N82E16814130759
Return Policy: VGA Standard Return Policy
-$80.00 Instant


$299.99
$219.99
1

EVGA Gift - Duke Nukem Forever Game
Item #: N82E16800996205
Return Policy: Standard Return Policy
-$29.99 Saving


$29.99
$0.00
1

LEPA B650-SA 650W SLI Ready CrossFire Ready 80 PLUS BRONZE Certified Active PFC Power Supply
Item #: N82E16817194103
Return Policy: Standard Return Policy
-$5.00 Instant
$10.00 Mail-in Rebate Card


$79.99
$74.99
1

G.SKILL 4GB (2 x 2GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1333 (PC3 10600) Dual Channel Kit Desktop Memory Model F3-10600CL9D-4GBNT
Item #: N82E16820231253
Return Policy: Memory Standard Return Policy


$22.99
1


Intel Core i5-3450 Ivy Bridge 3.1GHz (3.5GHz Turbo) LGA 1155 77W Quad-Core Desktop Processor Intel HD Graphics 2500 BX80637I53450
Item #: N82E16819116506
Return Policy: CPU Replacement Only Return Policy
ASRock B75 PRO3 LGA 1155 Intel B75 HDMI SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX Intel Motherboard
Item #: N82E16813157314
Return Policy: Standard Return Policy
-$12.00 Combo


$279.98
$267.98
Subtotal: $712.92
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July 16, 2012 11:00:37 PM

loops said:
newegg (note combos) Just an draft of a 700 build that has a good cpu/gpu....I'd work a bit more on the mobo but here it a sample

1

LG DVD Burner Black SATA Model GH24NS90 - OEM
Item #: N82E16827136247
Return Policy: Standard Return Policy


$16.99
1

Rosewill Blackbone Black Steel / Plastic ATX Mid Tower Computer Case
Item #: N82E16811147023
Return Policy: Standard Return Policy
-$10.00 Instant


$49.99
$39.99
1

Western Digital Caviar Blue WD5000AAKX 500GB 7200 RPM SATA 6.0Gb/s 3.5" Internal Hard Drive -Bare Drive
Item #: N82E16822136769
Return Policy: Standard Return Policy
-$15.00 Instant


$84.99
$69.99
1

EVGA 015-P3-1480-KR GeForce GTX 480 (Fermi) 1536MB 384-bit GDDR5 PCI Express 2.0 x16 HDCP Ready SLI Support Video Card
Item #: N82E16814130759
Return Policy: VGA Standard Return Policy
-$80.00 Instant


$299.99
$219.99
1

EVGA Gift - Duke Nukem Forever Game
Item #: N82E16800996205
Return Policy: Standard Return Policy
-$29.99 Saving


$29.99
$0.00
1

LEPA B650-SA 650W SLI Ready CrossFire Ready 80 PLUS BRONZE Certified Active PFC Power Supply
Item #: N82E16817194103
Return Policy: Standard Return Policy
-$5.00 Instant
$10.00 Mail-in Rebate Card


$79.99
$74.99
1

G.SKILL 4GB (2 x 2GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1333 (PC3 10600) Dual Channel Kit Desktop Memory Model F3-10600CL9D-4GBNT
Item #: N82E16820231253
Return Policy: Memory Standard Return Policy


$22.99
1


Intel Core i5-3450 Ivy Bridge 3.1GHz (3.5GHz Turbo) LGA 1155 77W Quad-Core Desktop Processor Intel HD Graphics 2500 BX80637I53450
Item #: N82E16819116506
Return Policy: CPU Replacement Only Return Policy
ASRock B75 PRO3 LGA 1155 Intel B75 HDMI SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX Intel Motherboard
Item #: N82E16813157314
Return Policy: Standard Return Policy
-$12.00 Combo


$279.98
$267.98
Subtotal: $712.92



I didnt even think about the GTX 480, I wonder how that will fare against the 7850 and the GTX 560 TI and non-TI.

What's goin on with the CPU/mobo combo? It has onboard graphics too? How does that work with a graphics card already?
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a c 118 B Homebuilt system
July 16, 2012 11:15:09 PM

The GTX 480s are about on par with 7850s performance. However something you have to know about the GTX 480s, they are an older generation video card, and they run hot, and use a lot more electricity than 7850s and even GTX 560 TIs.

As far as the CPU mobo combo. Most Intel Sandy/Ivy Bridge CPUs have onboard graphics built into the CPUs (, however this feature is disabled by installing a discrete graphics card.) And for a gaming system, Intel's onboard graphics really are not very powerful.
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July 16, 2012 11:43:24 PM

vaxio said:
I didnt even think about the GTX 480, I wonder how that will fare against the 7850 and the GTX 560 TI and non-TI.

What's goin on with the CPU/mobo combo? It has onboard graphics too? How does that work with a graphics card already?


The 480 runs hot and uses power (note the psu i picked) but it functions rather well and the heat can be dealt with my running a fan controller program in most cases.

The 480 is better than the 560ti and non ti and better than the 7850 unless you consider power and heat issues.

Dont stress about the on board gpu that is part of the CPU. The gpu you pick up will be what is running the show.


More about the 480:
http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/gaming-graphics-car...

We did notice an excellent deal on Newegg for EVGA's GeForce GTX 480. At $210, this card performs a lot like AMD's $300 Radeon HD 7870. While it does suck down quite a bit of power and generate copious heat, the GeForce GTX 480 remains an impressive performer, especially at that price. EVGA even throws in a copy of Duke Nukem Forever.

http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/gaming-graphics-car...

At 219ish the 480 is good pick. You could even sell the game you get with it to bring the cost down below 200 bucks. If I could, I'd take a 480 over the 560s I have now. Even better, I'd take a 7850. But at 700 bucks limit, 480 is a better pick than the 560 and 560 ti imo.
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a c 118 B Homebuilt system
July 16, 2012 11:54:49 PM

Oh don't get me wrong, the 480 is a great buy at the price its at. Although I'm not sure if chewing bubble gum and kicking ass is really a selling point (Obscure Duke Nukem reference) that game sucked lol.
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July 17, 2012 12:37:15 AM

loops said:
The 480 runs hot and uses power (note the psu i picked) but it functions rather well and the heat can be dealt with my running a fan controller program in most cases.

The 480 is better than the 560ti and non ti and better than the 7850 unless you consider power and heat issues.

Dont stress about the on board gpu that is part of the CPU. The gpu you pick up will be what is running the show.


More about the 480:
http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/gaming-graphics-car...

We did notice an excellent deal on Newegg for EVGA's GeForce GTX 480. At $210, this card performs a lot like AMD's $300 Radeon HD 7870. While it does suck down quite a bit of power and generate copious heat, the GeForce GTX 480 remains an impressive performer, especially at that price. EVGA even throws in a copy of Duke Nukem Forever.

http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/gaming-graphics-car...

At 219ish the 480 is good pick. You could even sell the game you get with it to bring the cost down below 200 bucks. If I could, I'd take a 480 over the 560s I have now. Even better, I'd take a 7850. But at 700 bucks limit, 480 is a better pick than the 560 and 560 ti imo.



Yup, I looked into the 480 SLI and I saw those same concerns as well. The EVGA GeForce GTX 480 SLI is only $20 cheaper than the Sapphire 7850 and I'm more inclined towards the 7850. How does that mobo that you chose compare to mine? I went down to a 520W PSU and saved like $10 there. With the 7850 in there I'm at $725 with shipping. The i5-3450 you linked though kills the Phenom II I believe, but your CPU + mobo costs about $70 more than my CPU + mobo combo. So basically, how does that mobo compare with the one I have selected now?
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a c 118 B Homebuilt system
July 17, 2012 12:44:09 AM

SLi is Crossfire for Nvidia. Just so you know, its a single GTX 480 you're buying.

As far as how the motherboard loops linked you to compares to the Asus AMD one you were looking at. It is a decent board, with the same warranty. Similar features, neither board as I understand it support Sli/Crossfire, meaning both builds will be a single video card setup.

The 3450 does outperform the Phenom II. Is it worth the extra price? That depends on what games you're playing. We come back to what you already figured out, the video card for 98% of games out there is going to be the limiting factor.

Edit: Apparently both boards do support crossfire/Sli. Although the 2nd card will run at x4. Which is not idea for dual 7850s or 480s. Although I suppose the point is moot, because ideally you'll need a 750 watt PSU to handle dual cards of those caliber.
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July 17, 2012 12:49:55 AM

I found another good combo:

Intel Core i5-2400 Sandy Bridge 3.1GHz (3.4GHz Turbo Boost) LGA 1155 95W Quad-Core Desktop Processor Intel HD Graphics 2000
(http://www.newegg.com/Product/ComboDealDetails.aspx?Ite...)

For 249.98

The main downside is that the mobo seems pretty lame, it only supports 1333mhz DDR3 RAM and doesn't leave too much room for upgrade later on. But the i5-2400 destroys the Phenom II X4 965, but that combo makes my grand total of $725 with shipping (and the 7850) go up to $775.
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a c 118 B Homebuilt system
July 17, 2012 12:54:40 AM

That motherboard is kinda of shitty to be honest with you. But yea the i5-2400 is a good buy. As far as the RAM, theres no real difference between RAM at 1333mhz and 1600mhz, or 1866 for that matter, I wouldn't worry about it. What I would worry about potentially is the fact that the board only has 2 DIMM slots. While chances are you'd probably never need more than 8GB of RAM, at least 4 DIMM slots keeps your options open without having to throw away 2 perfectly good 4GB modules to replace them with 2 8GB ones.

The other problem with that motherboard is it only supports SATA II, no SATA III. Not particularly useful for a traditional hard drive, (Since they don't even saturate the SATA II bandwidth) its pretty lame should you ever want to get an SSD.

The board also has hardly any USB ports, crappy audio support. over all its not even a polished turd. Its just a turd, lol.
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July 17, 2012 12:57:58 AM

nekulturny said:
SLi is Crossfire for Nvidia. Just so you know, its a single GTX 480 you're buying.

As far as how the motherboard loops linked you to compares to the Asus AMD one you were looking at. It is a decent board, with the same warranty. Similar features, neither board as I understand it support Sli/Crossfire, meaning both builds will be a single video card setup.

The 3450 does outperform the Phenom II. Is it worth the extra price? That depends on what games you're playing. We come back to what you already figured out, the video card for 98% of games out there is going to be the limiting factor.

Edit: Apparently both boards do support crossfire/Sli. Although the 2nd card will run at x4. Which is not idea for dual 7850s or 480s. Although I suppose the point is moot, because ideally you'll need a 750 watt PSU to handle dual cards of those caliber.


I must've phrased something wrong, I didn't mean that I was going to go with 2 graphics cards, that wouldnt fit my budget at all. Or maybe I misunderstood you?

Regarding the games, I play LoL and Diablo III mainly. I think I want to get BF3 though, I like to play FPS on XBOX360 but I haven't ever had a good enough computer to play them on PC. Currently I'm using an Acer laptop with integrated graphics and it just really depresses me. It actually can't run Diablo III right now and I have to play on a friend's computer.

nekulturny said:
The board also has hardly any USB ports, crappy audio support. over all its not even a polished turd. Its just a turd, lol.



Lol yes... after some more looking, that mobo is garbage.
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a c 118 B Homebuilt system
July 17, 2012 1:02:48 AM

Quote:
I must've phrased something wrong, I didn't mean that I was going to go with 2 graphics cards, that wouldnt fit my budget at all. Or maybe I misunderstood yo


Oh no, you just said 480 Sli, and I wanted to make sure you understood what you were saying lol. Sli stands for scalable link interface, it is a feature on nvidia (like crossfire for amd cards) that allows you to run multiple video cards in tandem.

As far as Diablo III, LoL and Battlefield 3, these are all games that simply will not care what modern CPU you use. Be it a Phenom II, or i5. With a GTX 480 or a 7850, you will plow through all of those games regardless of the CPU.

Quote:
Currently I'm using an Acer laptop with integrated graphics and it just really depresses me.


I feel your pain. I've got an Acer Aspire with an Athlon TF-20 single core with Radeon HD3000 graphics myself. Shes an old girl, and even HD youtube videos are choppy. I also have an older Dell XPS M1530 with a Core2Duo and an Nvidia 512mb GPU, its like night and day between those laptops.
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a c 118 B Homebuilt system
July 17, 2012 1:05:56 AM

Diablo 3


BF3 singleplayer


I have LoL, if you're really curious I can do a Fraps run on it if you want, but I'll tell you it hits 60FPS stable easily.
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July 17, 2012 1:24:56 AM

nekulturny said:
Diablo 3
http://media.bestofmicro.com/F/O/336228/original/CPU%20clock.png

BF3 singleplayer
http://static.techspot.com/articles-info/448/bench/CPU_02.png

I have LoL, if you're really curious I can do a Fraps run on it if you want, but I'll tell you it hits 60FPS stable easily.



So it appears that the Phenom II X4 965 BE (wish I could find a 975 from a reputable place) holds up just fine in the current market of games! thanks for those graphics! I noticed you were linking the 580, but bc of the heat/power issue, I'm leaning more towards the 7850, its $20 or $30 more but safer I think. What do you think?
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a c 118 B Homebuilt system
July 17, 2012 1:35:07 AM

I think the 7850 is the better choice personally, is the GTX 480 a good choice too? Yes it is. My advice is to flip a coin. I know, so wishywashy huh? As far as the GTX 480 running hot, I wouldnt worry too much, thats why we have warranties.

This one has a 3 year warranty:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Honestly the 975 is not worth the extra price. I bought my 975 before I realized the little trick to that. They're the same exact CPU, they're just clocked different. Yes the 975 might be binned a little better and give you potentially a higher OC, however, if you get a 4.0 stable overclock (which you should with the 965) thats pretty decent, and I'd be happy with it. If you want a Phenom II 975, just set the multiplier to 18x. 200mhz ref clock x 18= 3.6GHZ, viola, Phenom II 975. You can take a sharpie pen and cross out the 6 printed on the CPU and put a 7 in there if you want (actually don't do that last part, I'm being a smartass lol)
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July 17, 2012 2:13:34 AM

nekulturny said:
I think the 7850 is the better choice personally, is the GTX 480 a good choice too? Yes it is. My advice is to flip a coin. I know, so wishywashy huh? As far as the GTX 480 running hot, I wouldnt worry too much, thats why we have warranties.

This one has a 3 year warranty:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Honestly the 975 is not worth the extra price. I bought my 975 before I realized the little trick to that. They're the same exact CPU, they're just clocked different. Yes the 975 might be binned a little better and give you potentially a higher OC, however, if you get a 4.0 stable overclock (which you should with the 965) thats pretty decent, and I'd be happy with it. If you want a Phenom II 975, just set the multiplier to 18x. 200mhz ref clock x 18= 3.6GHZ, viola, Phenom II 975. You can take a sharpie pen and cross out the 6 printed on the CPU and put a 7 in there if you want (actually don't do that last part, I'm being a smartass lol)


I think the 7850 has a 2 year warranty as well. I may have to get an extra cooler? If that's the case, the price difference comes out to be the same. I really don't know though, the extra heat could really not be a big deal. I'll have to keep looking into it!
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a c 118 B Homebuilt system
July 17, 2012 2:15:54 AM

Well, the case you're looking at looks to me like it has pretty good airflow, I wouldn't be too concerned. That big side panel fan it has should take care of it. Although, I'm not sure what to make of the hot pink front bezel and the red LED fan. :lol: 
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
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July 17, 2012 2:26:06 AM

nekulturny said:
Well, the case you're looking at looks to me like it has pretty good airflow, I wouldn't be too concerned. That big side panel fan it has should take care of it. Although, I'm not sure what to make of the hot pink front bezel and the red LED fan. :lol: 
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...



:lol:  that case is so ridiculous
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July 17, 2012 3:15:45 AM

if i run with the 7850 and Phenom II how many watts do I need on my PSU?
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July 17, 2012 3:22:49 AM

Just know that Bf3 benchmarks are single player...in multi player it may be different.

As much as I like the 7850, I would not go out of my way to downgrade to a slower CPU when a 480 is an option. My build gets you there with a latest CPU and an ok mobo. The b75 is fine, I'd just like to get a z77 mobo.

imo, ib i5 + 480 is a better pick than an amd cpu and 7850. That is just my own call.
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a c 118 B Homebuilt system
July 17, 2012 3:36:41 AM

Quote:
Just know that Bf3 benchmarks are single player...in multi player it may be different.


Yea. I thought that for a long time too, and believe me, I've spent quite a bit of time looking for evidence. The only thing that is conclusive, is BF3 multiplayer will use as many cores as the CPU has to give. (It will even use all 8 cores of a Bulldozer FX-8120/8150.

I did find evidence that it will even treat HyperThreads as if they were cores (something no other game is coded to do), although thats not conclusive. Of course we do know, HyperThreads do not have the same power that a physical core does.

As far as i5 w/ 480 or Phenom II w/7850. Don't forget Phenom II w/480 is an option as well, or vice versa.
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July 17, 2012 4:01:12 AM

nekulturny said:
Quote:
Just know that Bf3 benchmarks are single player...in multi player it may be different.


Yea. I thought that for a long time too, and believe me, I've spent quite a bit of time looking for evidence. The only thing that is conclusive, is BF3 multiplayer will use as many cores as the CPU has to give. (It will even use all 8 cores of a Bulldozer FX-8120/8150.

I did find evidence that it will even treat HyperThreads as if they were cores (something no other game is coded to do), although thats not conclusive. Of course we do know, HyperThreads do not have the same power that a physical core does.

As far as i5 w/ 480 or Phenom II w/7850. Don't forget Phenom II w/480 is an option as well, or vice versa.



I dont think there is a "wrong" pick here, amd/7850 = cooler, less heat. i5/480 more raw power but heat and power.

Upgrades for the cpu and gup are also something to think about...in time the i5 can go i7. The adm? not much more to go up if that was ever needed.

Just know that BF3 will not be alone when it comes to demanding games...MoH I hear is using the same game engn:

http://www.medalofhonor.com/video/medal-honor-warfighte...
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a c 118 B Homebuilt system
July 17, 2012 4:16:56 AM

Quote:
Upgrades for the cpu and gup are also something to think about...in time the i5 can go i7. The adm? not much more to go up if that was ever needed.

Meh, that wouldn't worry me too much, its folly to really expect a build to stay on top of things beyond 4 years no matter which one you go with. Intel's changing sockets next year, AMD so far PileDriver is confirmed to be on AM3+ but beyond that, nothing is concrete. I wouldn't expect it to be too commonplace for games to be CPU intensive in that time period, they're still using the same coding language they were using 15 years ago.

I'll send you here, my buddy Raiddinn explanation it all pretty well, I asked him about it myself, he gets into it about halfway thru the thread:

http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/350091-31-switching-i...

As far as Medal of Honor, I dunno about the actual programming behind it yet, but I'd say after playing the MoH 2010 reboot of the series, they better make their game more interesting, I found the campaign quite unremarkable. Good graphics yes, but like Battlefield 3 campaign, pure garbage and a blatant COD ripoff. I quite frankly suck at gaming, and cheaters aggrivate me to no end. People using aimbots and stuff, so I generally just avoid it altogether, so if I'm going to buy a game, the single player game better be worth my time.

Wikipedia says that Medal of Honor 2012 you linked is going to be on the Frostbite 2 engine (which is what BF3 runs on as you said), which means if the Phenom II is up to that (and it is), then MoH will be fine. It also means, that if one wanted to upgrade to a PileDriver 8 core, it would use all 8 cores.

Multiplayer benches are notoriously inconsistent due to factors like server connection, but even so, I have seen benches that show even Bulldozer 8 cores doing a little better in BF3 than even i7-2700Ks. But again, because of the inconsistency with Multiplayer, that has to be taken with a grain of salt. PileDriver is looking like it will be on par with Sandy Bridge/Ivy Bridge i5s based on the Quad Trinity Benches against the i3-2100 that Tom's did.

Beta BF3 MP bench with the FX-8150
http://www.hardocp.com/article/2011/10/11/amd_bulldozer...
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July 17, 2012 3:06:53 PM

Thanks for the great info guys! If I went with the i5, the one that would fit my budget is probably the i5-2400, which I would get the gigabyte z68 mob. To stay within my budget, the graphics card I would get would be the 6870 or the original one I picked out, GTX 560.

However, I'm more inclined to go with a less powerful CPU for a more powerful GPU. I'm basically stuck between the 7850 and the 480 right now. How many watts does my PSU need for either of those builds? Will 600W be enough?

I also plan on waiting until next week to make the purchase because supposedly Radeon is releasing a new graphics card and it may affect the pricing of everything else.
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a c 118 B Homebuilt system
July 17, 2012 3:09:19 PM

You're welcome. 600 watts will be sufficient for any of the builds as configured.
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July 17, 2012 6:33:13 PM

Best answer selected by vaxio.
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!