Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Video card suggestions for new build?

Tags:
  • New Build
  • Graphics Cards
  • Systems
  • Product
Last response: in Systems
Share
July 16, 2012 4:50:10 PM

I seem to always have the most difficulty in choosing from the sea of video cards available. I am not a gamer, but I do use numerous video applications, especially for creating video animations of large-size graphics.

Can anyone recommend a good graphics card to round out my list of components? The price is not important, but I desire simplicity instead of the very elaborate, power-hungry cards used by gamers that are basically heat islands and look ridiculously huge when seated on a normal ATX form factor MB. LOL! I require the card to have HDMI capability and to process graphics and videos quickly. Thanks!

I also have a couple of additional questions at the bottom if anyone would care to comment.

Case -- 1 Antec Sonata Series SOLO II Black Aluminum / Steel ATX Mid Tower Computer Case
MB -- 1 Intel BOXDZ77GA70K LGA 1155 Intel Z77 HDMI SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX Intel Motherboard
PSU -- 1 High Current Pro HCP-850 850W TX12V v2.3 / EPS12V v2.92 SLI Certified CrossFire Certified 80 PLUS GOLD Certified Modular Active PFC Power Supply
CPU -- 1 Intel Core i7-3770K Ivy Bridge 3.5GHz (3.9GHz Turbo) LGA 1155 77W Quad-Core Desktop Processor Intel HD Graphics 4000 BX80637I73770K
RAM -- 1 Crucial Ballistix 16GB (2 x 8GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Desktop Memory Model BLT2KIT8G3D1608DT1TX0
SSD -- 1 OCZ Vertex 4 VTX4-25SAT3-256G 2.5" 256GB SATA III MLC Internal Solid State Drive (SSD)
DVD -- 1 ASUS DVD Burner Black SATA Model DRW-24B3ST/BLK/G/AS
COOLING -- 2 Antec TrueQuiet 120 120mm Case Fans
Video Card -- ???

Questions:

Video Card? Please recommend...
Cooler to replace Intel CPU stock fan? Please recommend...
Heat spreaders for RAM? Please recommend...
Any compatibility issues in my list of components so far? Please advise...

More about : video card suggestions build

July 16, 2012 5:22:56 PM

Well, the HD7750 is currently the best performance/Watt card, I guess you'd appreciate that. If you're serious about editing and are using software that can use professional cards, get one of those.

An aftermarket cooler isn't required if you're not overclocking. If you want some added cooling and quiet at stock, check this http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... It's cheap.

You don't any special heat spreaders for RAM...

The PSU is ridiculous, go with this http://pcpartpicker.com/part/corsair-power-supply-cmpsu... it's got a good rebate. I don't see any other problems.
m
0
l
July 16, 2012 6:31:31 PM

FinneousPJ said:
Well, the HD7750 is currently the best performance/Watt card, I guess you'd appreciate that. If you're serious about editing and are using software that can use professional cards, get one of those.

An aftermarket cooler isn't required if you're not overclocking. If you want some added cooling and quiet at stock, check this http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... It's cheap.

You don't any special heat spreaders for RAM...

The PSU is ridiculous, go with this http://pcpartpicker.com/part/corsair-power-supply-cmpsu... it's got a good rebate. I don't see any other problems.


Thanks, FinneousPJ.

I am strongly considering this video card...

ASUS HD7750-1GD5-V2 Radeon HD 7750 1GB 128-bit GDDR5 PCI Express 3.0 x16 HDCP Ready Video Card

Regarding the PSU, what is the best way to determine sufficient PSU power needed? Should I go through each component and sum the total watts drawn by each part and select something that is somewhat higher than the total wattage drawn, or is it not cumulative? I want to allow room to add a special audio card and an extra SSD or two when the prices drop a little more and the technology improves a little more, so I need to consider that as well. I really like Antec. They completely support their stuff and I've never had a single problem with any Antec PSU or other product. Friendly support staff too. PSU price isn't an issue.

If I ultimately go with a dual monitor configuration, will the ASUS HD7750 support that? I'm thinking I would only need an HDMI splitter since the card only has one HDMI port.

Thanks again for the advice!
m
0
l
Related resources
a b U Graphics card
July 16, 2012 6:51:32 PM

If you use Adobe Premiere for your editing and rendering, then you want a Adobe-certified GPU card for GPU-accelerated performance.


Supported AMD graphics cards for GPU acceleration

• AMD Radeon HD 6750M (only on certain MacBook Pro computers running OS X Lion (10.7.x) with a minimum of 1GB VRAM)
• AMD Radeon HD 6770M (only on certain MacBook Pro computers running OS X Lion (10.7.x) with a minimum of 1GB VRAM)

Supported NVIDIA graphics cards for GPU acceleration

GeForce GTX 285 (Windows and Mac OS)
GeForce GTX 470 (Windows)
GeForce GTX 570 (Windows)
GeForce GTX 580 (Windows)
NVIDIA® Tesla C2075 card (Windows) when paired with a Quadro card as part of an NVIDIA Maximus™ configuration
Quadro FX 3700M (Windows)
Quadro FX 3800 (Windows)
Quadro FX 3800M (Windows)
Quadro FX 4800 (Windows and Mac OS)
Quadro FX 5800 (Windows)
Quadro 2000 (Windows)
Quadro 2000D (Windows)
Quadro 2000M (Windows)
Quadro 3000M (Windows)
Quadro 4000 (Windows and Mac OS)
Quadro 4000M (Windows)
Quadro 5000 (Windows)
Quadro 5000M (Windows)
Quadro 5010M (Windows)
Quadro 6000 (Windows)
Quadro CX (Windows)
Tesla C2075** (Windows)


m
0
l
July 16, 2012 6:55:26 PM

I believe it supports three screens over HDMI, DVI +DisplayPort. A HDMI splitter I believe will only duplicate your desktop over two screens, not exactly useful. I may be wrong though. Never used multiple screens on my own system.

Re PSU yes, that is a fool proof method, since realistically all components will never draw maximum power at the same time. The 430W will be enough for whatever upgrades as long as you're not looking at power hogging GPUs like a GTX590.
m
0
l
a c 106 U Graphics card
July 16, 2012 6:56:02 PM

if its strictly professional work, quadro cards are designed for business use and notfor gaming.
m
0
l
July 16, 2012 7:09:24 PM

FinneousPJ said:
I believe it supports three screens over HDMI, DVI +DisplayPort. A HDMI splitter I believe will only duplicate your desktop over two screens, not exactly useful. I may be wrong though. Never used multiple screens on my own system.

Re PSU yes, that is a fool proof method, since realistically all components will never draw maximum power at the same time. The 430W will be enough for whatever upgrades as long as you're not looking at power hogging GPUs like a GTX590.


Thanks, FinneousPJ. Yes, I will rethink the video card and ensure that I purchase one with two HDMI outs, as I am fairly sure I will soon use two monitors and I don't want two different output types. I am quite satisfied with HDMI.

jemm and dudewitbow, thanks also for your advice and comments.
m
0
l
July 16, 2012 8:12:54 PM

There are wattage calculators around, but not very precise.

In any case, your system will run on any good quality ( think recognized brand name) PSU that is 550-650W (650W including serious CPU overclock)

850W gold is total overkill, and ONLY required if you're running high-end crossfire/SLI (dual gpu) videocards, and those 1000W+ only for triple/quad videocards and very-high-end motherboards.

In reality, your system won't use more than 100when idling (no joke, that little), and at most 400w in full load (cpu running at 100%, also the videocard running at 100%)
m
0
l
July 16, 2012 8:19:13 PM

wavetrex said:
There are wattage calculators around, but not very precise.

In any case, your system will run on any good quality ( think recognized brand name) PSU that is 550-650W (650W including serious CPU overclock)

850W gold is total overkill, and ONLY required if you're running high-end crossfire/SLI (dual gpu) videocards, and those 1000W+ only for triple/quad videocards and very-high-end motherboards.

In reality, your system won't use more than 100when idling (no joke, that little), and at most 400w in full load (cpu running at 100%, also the videocard running at 100%)


Thanks, wavetrex. I am also planning to add an m-audio soundcard for audio recording, so I will check the power reqs for those. As you and others have stated the 850W was overkill.

Regarding the PSU calculators, I agree. I've seen those and they are too generic.

For some of the components, I am having trouble finding the power reqs, such as the ASUS video card. I've been reading through the reqs and cannot locate those.
m
0
l
a c 106 U Graphics card
July 16, 2012 8:26:20 PM

for power consumption, you have to look at the base models power consumption. each brand of the said card has a similar power consumption chart give or take a few watts because of the fan.
m
0
l
July 18, 2012 8:46:23 PM

A sound card doesn't use more than 15W, so no worries about that.

And remember, a good brand PSU is designed to work even at 110% load (but not recommended), however you'll never reach that with your system. (Check all PSU tests on Anandtech, they test 20, 50, 80, 100, 110% to see if a PSU cracks under pressure, most of them don't)

The idea is... a computer while it runs has variable power consumption, depending on too many factors to consider, and there are spikes and valleys. Even if such a spike HAPPENS by some weird chance to hit nearly 100% of your PSU, it will be for a very short while ( miliseconds to seconds), so absolutely no problem. As long as the "average" max consumption is below 75%, you don't have to worry about power.

The problem with oversized PSU is that they lose efficiency. The best choice is when the computer runs idle at 20%, normal usage at around 45-50% (watching movies, some work) and max usage at 75% (heavy gaming, complex maps with lots of objects) - These percentages are power consumption related to the PSU's rated values.
If you are in this zone, you consume the least power, if you barely hit 50% of the PSU at max it means than at idle it is below 15%, where the efficiency drops drastically.
And since most of the time your computer will be idle, you'll simply eat (and pay) for power losses in an inefficient are of the utilization.

And then there's the cost... 850W 80+gold is bloody expensive... ! You would be better getting a better cooled case, or some other higher-class component.

Well, that's about all I can say in this matter!
Good luck in your choices !
m
0
l
July 18, 2012 8:55:41 PM

wavetrex said:
A sound card doesn't use more than 15W, so no worries about that.

And remember, a good brand PSU is designed to work even at 110% load (but not recommended), however you'll never reach that with your system. (Check all PSU tests on Anandtech, they test 20, 50, 80, 100, 110% to see if a PSU cracks under pressure, most of them don't)

The idea is... a computer while it runs has variable power consumption, depending on too many factors to consider, and there are spikes and valleys. Even if such a spike HAPPENS by some weird chance to hit nearly 100% of your PSU, it will be for a very short while ( miliseconds to seconds), so absolutely no problem. As long as the "average" max consumption is below 75%, you don't have to worry about power.

The problem with oversized PSU is that they lose efficiency. The best choice is when the computer runs idle at 20%, normal usage at around 45-50% (watching movies, some work) and max usage at 75% (heavy gaming, complex maps with lots of objects) - These percentages are power consumption related to the PSU's rated values.
If you are in this zone, you consume the least power, if you barely hit 50% of the PSU at max it means than at idle it is below 15%, where the efficiency drops drastically.
And since most of the time your computer will be idle, you'll simply eat (and pay) for power losses in an inefficient are of the utilization.

And then there's the cost... 850W 80+gold is bloody expensive... ! You would be better getting a better cooled case, or some other higher-class component.

Well, that's about all I can say in this matter!
Good luck in your choices !


Thanks very much, wavetrex! Excellent comments. I throttled back on the PSU, and opted for a 750W. Still probably overkill, but provides some room for adding other peripherals, USB devices, etc.

I placed my order yesterday. Thanks again for your advice and comments. Much appreciated!

http://pcpartpicker.com/p/coeQ

Case -- 1 Antec Sonata Series SOLO II Black Aluminum / Steel ATX Mid Tower Computer Case
MB -- 1 Intel BOXDZ77GA70K LGA 1155 Intel Z77 HDMI SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX Intel Motherboard
PSU -- 1 High Current Pro HCP-750 750W TX12V v2.3 / EPS12V v2.92 SLI Certified CrossFire Certified 80 PLUS GOLD Certified Modular Active PFC Power Supply
CPU -- 1 Intel Core i7-3770K Ivy Bridge 3.5GHz (3.9GHz Turbo) LGA 1155 77W Quad-Core Desktop Processor Intel HD Graphics 4000 BX80637I73770K
RAM -- 1 G.SKILL Ripjaws X Series 16GB (2 x 8GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Desktop Memory Model F3-1600C9D-16GXM
SSD -- 1 OCZ Vertex 4 VTX4-25SAT3-256G 2.5" 256GB SATA III MLC Internal Solid State Drive (SSD)
DVD -- 1 ASUS DVD Burner Black SATA Model DRW-24B3ST/BLK/G/AS
Case Cooling -- 2 Antec TrueQuiet 120 120mm Case Fans
CPU cooling -- COOLER MASTER Hyper 212 EVO RR-212E-20PK-R2 Continuous Direct Contact 120mm Sleeve CPU Cooler Compatible with latest Intel 2011/1366/1155 and AMD FM1/AM3+
Video Card -- 1 EVGA 04G-P4-2673-KR GeForce GTX 670 Superclocked+ w/Backplate 4GB 256-bit GDDR5 PCI Express 3.0 x16 HDCP Ready SLI Support Video Card
m
0
l
!