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DisableDHCPMediaSense key doesn't remove systray icon

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Anonymous
March 31, 2005 1:57:01 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.customize (More info?)

This is an update on trying to hide/remove the x'd out LAN icon from the
system tray. I created the DisableDHCPMediaSense key as suggested in another
thread in
HKey_Local_Machine\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\Tcpip\Parameters but it
did not change the behavior of the icon. It still appears in the systray and
will not stay hidden. Rebooting or waking from hibernation causes the state
to revert to hide when inactive. Remember I cannot disable the LAN or my
dialup ISP fails. I just want to hide it or make it go away without
disabling the LAN.

I also pinged the loopback address after disabling the LAN and it worked
fine so the loopback doesn't seem to be tied to the LAN.

Any other suggestions?
March 31, 2005 5:05:14 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.customize (More info?)

inline


"saynotogmos" <saynotogmos@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:4AFE568C-F491-4A0E-AF15-C2B9D50546FA@microsoft.com...
> This is an update on trying to hide/remove the x'd out LAN icon from the
> system tray. I created the DisableDHCPMediaSense key as suggested in
> another
> thread in
> HKey_Local_Machine\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\Tcpip\Parameters but
> it
> did not change the behavior of the icon. It still appears in the systray
> and
> will not stay hidden. Rebooting or waking from hibernation causes the
> state
> to revert to hide when inactive. Remember I cannot disable the LAN or my
> dialup ISP fails. I just want to hide it or make it go away without
> disabling the LAN.
>
> I also pinged the loopback address after disabling the LAN and it worked
> fine so the loopback doesn't seem to be tied to the LAN.
>
loopback stands for 127.0.0.1 (as you know) and packets addressed that way
never even get to the network.
they basically just get as far as the NIC, thereby confirming that at least
your network-stack (ie. protocols/services installed) are functioning
properly.
So your conclusion (doesn't seem to be tied to the LAN) might be a little
premature.

george


> Any other suggestions?
>
!