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A question about Canon IS lenses.

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Anonymous
August 16, 2005 12:39:44 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

I am thinking of buying the 300mm f4L IS lens. I have heard that there is a
delay of up to 0.5s before the shutter fires to allow the IS system to get
up to speed. Is this true? I don't want to lose the advantage of the DSLR's
swift response.

Thanks

John

More about : question canon lenses

Anonymous
August 16, 2005 12:39:45 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Eatmorepies wrote:

> I am thinking of buying the 300mm f4L IS lens. I have heard that there is a
> delay of up to 0.5s before the shutter fires to allow the IS system to get
> up to speed. Is this true? I don't want to lose the advantage of the DSLR's
> swift response.

I'm sure there's time involved, but it's not long.. IS takes place
in about the same time it takes to focus.. I've never really noticed
the delay.

I don't know of many people that can whip a camera up to their
eye and instantly shoot when using a 300mm lens :-)

With long focal lengths there is some time involved in acquiring
the subject and then framing. I doing the shutter half-press to
get things in focus and stabilized during this time.
Anonymous
August 16, 2005 12:39:45 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Eatmorepies wrote:

> I am thinking of buying the 300mm f4L IS lens. I have heard that there is a
> delay of up to 0.5s before the shutter fires to allow the IS system to get
> up to speed. Is this true? I don't want to lose the advantage of the DSLR's
> swift response.

Assuming the effect is true, you have options:

a) don't buy the lens
b) buy the lens, but disable the IS

In both cases, you 'don't [...] lose the advantage of the DSLR's swift
response' (which sounds like a re-worded marketing blurb than anything
else); what more do you need?

However, as far as I can tell, you are the first to complain of this
'problem'; indeed, my own personal experience with two instances of
Canon's IS binoculars, an EF 500/4 and the 300/4 lenses indicates your
un-named source is either totally ignorant of the equipment (to wit:
the delay isn't worth worrying about), or was just pulling your leg.
Alas, USENET being what it is, we have The Bayesian Prior: _you_ are
just pulling our legs until you cite your source.
Related resources
Anonymous
August 16, 2005 12:39:45 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Eatmorepies" <naj9daynum3@lineone.net> wrote in message
news:4300ef82_2@mk-nntp-2.news.uk.tiscali.com...
>I am thinking of buying the 300mm f4L IS lens. I have heard that there is a
>delay of up to 0.5s before the shutter fires to allow the IS system to get
>up to speed. Is this true? I don't want to lose the advantage of the DSLR's
>swift response.
>
> Thanks
>
> John

The delay is far less than one half second.
I'd estimate about 1/5th of a second.

Also...when shooting action, most people have the shutter half-pressed well
before the actual exposure, which means the IS is whirring all along.
Anonymous
August 16, 2005 12:39:45 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Eatmorepies" <naj9daynum3@lineone.net> wrote in message
news:4300ef82_2@mk-nntp-2.news.uk.tiscali.com...
>I am thinking of buying the 300mm f4L IS lens. I have heard that there is a
>delay of up to 0.5s before the shutter fires to allow the IS system to get
>up to speed. Is this true? I don't want to lose the advantage of the DSLR's
>swift response.
>
> Thanks
>
> John
>
It takes about a half second, or less from the time the IS is first turned
on for it to kick in. Once it is turned on, it's nearly instantaneous from
that point on, for subsequent shots.

--
Skip Middleton
http://www.shadowcatcherimagery.com
Anonymous
August 16, 2005 12:39:45 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Eatmorepies wrote:
> I am thinking of buying the 300mm f4L IS lens. I have heard that there is a
> delay of up to 0.5s before the shutter fires to allow the IS system to get
> up to speed. Is this true? I don't want to lose the advantage of the DSLR's
> swift response.

I have this lens, as well as 500 f/4 L IS,
100-400 L IS, and 28-135 IS. I done a lot of action shots
with it on 10D and 1D Mark II bodies, and I have never
had an issue with startup time on any of the
IS lenses, and with tens of thousands of images.
I have had issues with autofocus not being able to
lock on and follow very fast and erratic action of
animals, even with the 1D Mark II, and this is with both
the 300 and 500 f/4 L IS lenses. The 1D Mark II is also
much much MUCH faster than the 10D. When I use the 10D
the response seems sluggish compared to the 1D II
(like a P&S feels sluggish after using a DSLR).

Roger
Images at: http://www.clarkvision.com
Anonymous
August 16, 2005 12:39:46 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Skip M" <shadowcatcher@cox.net> wrote in message
news:7UbMe.923$sw6.255@fed1read05...
> "Eatmorepies" <naj9daynum3@lineone.net> wrote in message
> news:4300ef82_2@mk-nntp-2.news.uk.tiscali.com...
>>I am thinking of buying the 300mm f4L IS lens. I have heard that there is
>>a delay of up to 0.5s before the shutter fires to allow the IS system to
>>get up to speed. Is this true? I don't want to lose the advantage of the
>>DSLR's swift response.
>>
>> Thanks
>>
>> John
>>
> It takes about a half second, or less from the time the IS is first turned
> on for it to kick in. Once it is turned on, it's nearly instantaneous
> from that point on, for subsequent shots.

Hey Skip...
Have you heard about the likely Canon 24-105 f4 *IS* L???
Had I seen this offering, I might have held off on the 24-70...
:( 
Seems my prediction wasn't too far off...
Anonymous
August 16, 2005 12:39:47 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"MarkĀ²" <mjmorgan(lowest even number here)@cox..net> wrote in message
news:CWbMe.1376$ct5.121@fed1read04...
>
> "Skip M" <shadowcatcher@cox.net> wrote in message
> news:7UbMe.923$sw6.255@fed1read05...
>> "Eatmorepies" <naj9daynum3@lineone.net> wrote in message
>> news:4300ef82_2@mk-nntp-2.news.uk.tiscali.com...
>>>I am thinking of buying the 300mm f4L IS lens. I have heard that there is
>>>a delay of up to 0.5s before the shutter fires to allow the IS system to
>>>get up to speed. Is this true? I don't want to lose the advantage of the
>>>DSLR's swift response.
>>>
>>> Thanks
>>>
>>> John
>>>
>> It takes about a half second, or less from the time the IS is first
>> turned on for it to kick in. Once it is turned on, it's nearly
>> instantaneous from that point on, for subsequent shots.
>
> Hey Skip...
> Have you heard about the likely Canon 24-105 f4 *IS* L???
> Had I seen this offering, I might have held off on the 24-70...
> :( 
> Seems my prediction wasn't too far off...
>
I just did hear about it. It wouldn't have dissuaded me from getting the
24-70, though, I needed that f2.8. I'm looking at it as a secondary lens,
though. We were going to buy a second 28-70, this might do the trick,
instead...
It figures, though, like we both said...

--
Skip Middleton
http://www.shadowcatcherimagery.com
Anonymous
August 16, 2005 1:13:08 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

>I am thinking of buying the 300mm f4L IS lens. I have heard that there is
>a delay of up to 0.5s before the shutter fires to allow the IS system to get
>up to speed. Is this true?

There's a delay slightly longer than acquiring AF but just slightly.
The "up to" probably covers this since it's typically much shorter than
0.5 sec, more like a few 10's of milliseconds. I shoot hummingbirds in
flight with a 500 f/4 IS (acquiring AF is the hard part) and usually
leave the IS on and don't notice the extra delay, but if the shutter
speed is fast enough you can always just switch it off if you find the
'delay' is bothersome. The only people I know who turn IS off for this
reason are shooting birds in flight at fast shutter speeds and they
don't want to delay AF in the slightest.

>I don't want to lose the advantage of the DSLR's
>swift response.

You'll see a lot more variation in focus speed between camera models
(ie, 10D is slower than the 20D which is slower than the 1D Mark II)
than you will between IS on and IS off.

Bill
Anonymous
August 16, 2005 3:00:56 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Bill Hilton" <bhilton665@aol.com> wrote in message
news:1124165588.344979.72870@g47g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
> >I am thinking of buying the 300mm f4L IS lens. I have heard that there is
>>a delay of up to 0.5s before the shutter fires to allow the IS system to
>>get
>>up to speed. Is this true?
>
> There's a delay slightly longer than acquiring AF but just slightly.
> The "up to" probably covers this since it's typically much shorter than
> 0.5 sec, more like a few 10's of milliseconds. I shoot hummingbirds in
> flight with a 500 f/4 IS (acquiring AF is the hard part) and usually
> leave the IS on and don't notice the extra delay, but if the shutter
> speed is fast enough you can always just switch it off if you find the
> 'delay' is bothersome. The only people I know who turn IS off for this
> reason are shooting birds in flight at fast shutter speeds and they
> don't want to delay AF in the slightest.
>
>>I don't want to lose the advantage of the DSLR's
>>swift response.
>
> You'll see a lot more variation in focus speed between camera models
> (ie, 10D is slower than the 20D which is slower than the 1D Mark II)
> than you will between IS on and IS off.

That's true.
IS is body-independant for start-up, while AF is waiting for direction from
the body sensors, which vary greatly in sensitivity (I know you know this
Bill...but others are listening...)
:) 
August 16, 2005 3:50:25 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Eatmorepies" <naj9daynum3@lineone.net> wrote in message
news:4300ef82_2@mk-nntp-2.news.uk.tiscali.com...
> I am thinking of buying the 300mm f4L IS lens. I have heard that there is
a
> delay of up to 0.5s before the shutter fires to allow the IS system to get
> up to speed. Is this true? I don't want to lose the advantage of the
DSLR's
> swift response.
>
> Thanks
>
> John
>
>
I have 2 IS lenses. While there is a tiny amount of time for the IS system
to get going, it is un-noticable, and it stays running all the time the
shutter is half pressed (focusng) and for a few seconds afterwards. In any
case it does NOT cause any delay to the camera to take a shot between
pressing the shutter and it actually firing.
The time taken to focus (manually or auto) is far longer in comparison.

IS is damn good!

Alan.
Anonymous
August 16, 2005 2:36:58 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Eatmorepies wrote:
>
> I am thinking of buying the 300mm f4L IS lens. I have heard that there is a
> delay of up to 0.5s before the shutter fires to allow the IS system to get
> up to speed. Is this true? I don't want to lose the advantage of the DSLR's
> swift response.
>
> Thanks
>
> John

The IS starts operating when you take a half-pressure to activate the
autofocus, and works continuously until you release the trigger. On my
17-85mm IS, the IS takes less than 1/4 second to start, and unless you
are taking an absolute grab shot as fast as possible, you won't notice
any lag at all. Under the usual shooting conditions, for me at least, I
have a half-pressure on the trigger while framing and focusing, and
firing is practically instantaneous when I shoot. Half a second after
you release the trigger, you can hear the IS stop.

Possiblt the 300mm is slower than the 17-85, but with regards to the
above I don't think it would be a problem.

Colin D.
August 16, 2005 3:33:09 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Eatmorepies" <naj9daynum3@lineone.net> wrote in message
news:4300ef82_2@mk-nntp-2.news.uk.tiscali.com...
> I am thinking of buying the 300mm f4L IS lens. I have heard that there is
a
> delay of up to 0.5s before the shutter fires to allow the IS system to get
> up to speed. Is this true? I don't want to lose the advantage of the
DSLR's
> swift response.
>
> Thanks
>
> John
>
>

there is no delay for firing the shutter. however, it is recommended for the
IS to be operational for around 1/2 sec or more to get the full benefit. you
don't NEED to wait for it, but if you want the benefit then IS is your
buddy.
usually, when IS is on, you're shooting a stationary subject or in the case
of the 70-200 2.8L IS, panning with a subject. in either case, the half
second for it to be fully effective is negligible (if panning, i'd hope you
are panning for longer 0.5s before releaasing the shutter!)
Anonymous
August 16, 2005 3:33:10 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"dave" <usenet@polo.devilgas.com> wrote in message
news:V9kMe.10795$JB4.9591@newsfe6-win.ntli.net...
>
> "Eatmorepies" <naj9daynum3@lineone.net> wrote in message
> news:4300ef82_2@mk-nntp-2.news.uk.tiscali.com...
>> I am thinking of buying the 300mm f4L IS lens. I have heard that there is
> a
>> delay of up to 0.5s before the shutter fires to allow the IS system to
>> get
>> up to speed. Is this true? I don't want to lose the advantage of the
> DSLR's
>> swift response.
>>
>> Thanks
>>
>> John
>>
>>
>
> there is no delay for firing the shutter. however, it is recommended for
> the
> IS to be operational for around 1/2 sec or more to get the full benefit.
> you
> don't NEED to wait for it, but if you want the benefit then IS is your
> buddy.
> usually, when IS is on, you're shooting a stationary subject or in the
> case
> of the 70-200 2.8L IS, panning with a subject. in either case, the half
> second for it to be fully effective is negligible (if panning, i'd hope
> you
> are panning for longer 0.5s before releaasing the shutter!)

This is true.
Most of the time when using IS, you're holding the button half way down far
longer than IS needs anyway (for other reasons).
Anonymous
August 16, 2005 5:01:53 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

>
>
>>I am thinking of buying the 300mm f4L IS lens. I have heard that there is a
>>delay of up to 0.5s before the shutter fires to allow the IS system to get
>>up to speed. Is this true? I don't want to lose the advantage of the DSLR's
>>swift response.
>
>

You should also remember that,if you don't have IS, you usually leave a
little time after you press the shutter button half way to let the
camera come to focus and for you to relax and try to become motionless.
If you try to shoot too fast, camera shake is a real possibility
except at high speeds, and for those you can just turn off the IS anyway.

Joe
!