Browser display size vs pixels (or resoution)

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

How do I get a .jpg to display at, say, double size?

In Irfanview I can set the pixels but sometimes I get a big picture
and sometimes I get a small one, mysteriously to me, for the
same .jpg size.

This pic http://home.att.net/~rhhardin/bike.jpg is 640x496 and
good-sized but only 87kb

vs this almost identical one
http://home.att.net/~rhhardin/bikebackup.jpg which is 532x459 and
about the same display size but 217 kb

If I reduce the latter to half size (to get about the same kb) how
can I get it to display double that size, at the current size?

I like say 80kb pics, but am not sure how to get them all about
600x600 display size.

Firefox and/or Netscape browsers.

--
Ron Hardin
rhhardin@mindspring.com

On the internet, nobody knows you're a jerk.
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More about browser display size pixels resoution
  1. Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

    Ron Hardin <rhhardin@mindspring.com> wrote:
    >How do I get a .jpg to display at, say, double size?

    >In Irfanview I can set the pixels but sometimes I get a big picture
    >and sometimes I get a small one, mysteriously to me, for the
    >same .jpg size.

    >This pic http://home.att.net/~rhhardin/bike.jpg is 640x496 and
    >good-sized but only 87kb

    >vs this almost identical one
    >http://home.att.net/~rhhardin/bikebackup.jpg which is 532x459 and
    >about the same display size but 217 kb

    >If I reduce the latter to half size (to get about the same kb) how
    >can I get it to display double that size, at the current size?

    >I like say 80kb pics, but am not sure how to get them all about
    >600x600 display size.

    >Firefox and/or Netscape browsers.

    I assume those sizes are the file sizes stored on your
    computer.

    It turns out that all jpegs are "compressed". The degree
    of compression depends on the amount of detail in the image.
    Thus two TIFF images originally the same size (in pixels) will
    produce different jpeg image sizes on disk.

    For any single given TIFF file the higher the compression
    the smaller the resultant file on the disk.

    When you display the resulting files, the one with the
    higher compression (smaller disk file size) will have less
    detail and be more blocky.

    There ain't no such thing as a free lunch.

    Also, shrinking the actual size of the image prior to
    turning it into a jpeg will decrease the size of the
    resulting file.

    But when you display that smaller image that's what you
    will get, a smaller image. Again, TANSTASFL.

    ---- Paul J. Gans
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