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Unable to Upgrade CPU with P4VMM2 ver 7.3

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November 27, 2012 9:11:00 PM

Hi to all,

i have been a lurker here whenever im trying to fix a PC related
problem. right now i need to post my problem here because im having
difficulty finding solution with the other related post that seems in similar
situation as i am now.


My problem is I cant upgrade my processor from Pentium 4 1.8ghz fsb 400 cache 256 to Pentium 4 2.8A Ghz fsb 533 cache 1mb using ECS P4VMM2 ver 7.3 motherboard. according to ECS website my mobo supports that processor with the updated BIOS which I already did. i tried switching the CPU Clock jumper but still no boot up. i cant say if the new processor is the problem because it did boot up but the processor only show 1.90 Ghz, cant use the keyboard, and windows xp freezes when it started loading. right now im still using the old processor. i m not knowledge about BIOS configuration it seems the only thing i can change in this area is the DRAM frequency which has the option of 100mhz or 133 and the CPU ratio which set to 8.0x while the CPU Frequency is locked at 100mhz. hope with this little information you might help me. T I A sorry for my english :) 



Here are my specs:

Motherboard: ECS P4VMM2 ver 7.3
Processor: P4 1.8 Ghz FSB 400 cache 256k upgrade to P4 2.8A Ghz FSB 533
Cache 1M
BIOS ver: 030703
RAM: 2X 256mb PC3200 (CPUz said its DDR)
HDD: IDE 160Gb
PSU: 300w

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November 27, 2012 9:16:50 PM

It could be that the board (a lot of old and even some new ECS boards) has some dying capacitors in the VRM section, so it can't supply enough current for your more power hungry P4 2.8A processor. It COULD also be the power supply. This usually results in working processor (boots up, runs some programs), but highly unstable.

Also, double check your heatsink to make sure it can dissipate the much higher TDP of the new(old) P4 processor.
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November 27, 2012 9:53:36 PM

cant tell if the PC has dying capacitor but this was bought in 2003 and after 4 years of light use my father told me the PC was broke he didnt told me the nature of the problem it was stock in garage for very long until i decided to use some of its working component and i realized that the HDD is the only problem when my father told me he experience frequent BSOD.
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November 27, 2012 10:40:25 PM

sydnew said:
cant tell if the PC has dying capacitor but this was bought in 2003 and after 4 years of light use my father told me the PC was broke he didnt told me the nature of the problem it was stock in garage for very long until i decided to use some of its working component and i realized that the HDD is the only problem when my father told me he experience frequent BSOD.


ECS is notorious for using crappy capacitors. At a friend's local computer shop a few years ago, MOST of the boards they tossed out from customer machines were ECS, usually with dead capacitors.

On your specific motherboard, a quick Google search reveals a lot of issues with bulging capacitors. Take a look at the capacitors and google the brand/markings on it, you'll find out for yourself if they are reliable or crappy.

When they fail slowly, you'll only experience gradual increases of BSODs, hard freezes and resets, but for some, it was catastrophic. In your case, if it is related to the bad capacitors, your new P4 processor has a higher power consumption, which means it presents a higher load to the VRM circuit. The capacitors are meant to smooth voltage spikes, when they vent (bulge), or become dry, the capacitance drops, and so it can't smooth the power as well. This means that although a lower powered CPU might seem to work (not for long), a higher powered CPU won't work at all, because the voltage swings are way too big and outside of design specifications of that CPU. This COULD be what you are seeing. The newer P4 you have is a Prescott, and one of the higher power consumption P4's ever produced.

If this is your problem, you can try fixing it if you are handy with electronic repair and soldering. But any other wise, I'd just keep the CPUs, RAm, and whatever you want, and recycle the rest. ECS boards usually come with some neat little aluminum heatsinks for chipsets that you can use to cool router CPUs to keep them a lot more stable.
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November 27, 2012 10:51:31 PM

Is the Bios revision 30703? If not it won't work. You should be able to change the freq & the multiplier. Its been so long since I looked at a 478 I'm not sure anymore.
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