Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Canon Paper Yellowing

Last response: in Digital Camera
Share
Anonymous
August 16, 2005 7:08:38 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

The photos I've printed from my very cheap Canon i470D inkjet have been
really great...but the print paper yellows terribly in just a few months. I
only use the best Canon paper and original Canon cartridges. Some of my
photos are put in clear plastic covers with magnets for the refridgerator.
My similarly covered commerically printed 35 mm shots which are over 12
years old are not yellowed at all. None of my photos are in direct
sunlight. Is anyone else experiencing this yellowing problem of Canon
paper?
xtx99@aol.com

More about : canon paper yellowing

Anonymous
August 16, 2005 10:19:37 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

xtx99@aol.com wrote:
> The photos I've printed from my very cheap Canon i470D inkjet have been
> really great...but the print paper yellows terribly in just a few months. I
> only use the best Canon paper and original Canon cartridges. Some of my
> photos are put in clear plastic covers with magnets for the refridgerator.
> My similarly covered commerically printed 35 mm shots which are over 12
> years old are not yellowed at all. None of my photos are in direct
> sunlight. Is anyone else experiencing this yellowing problem of Canon
> paper?
> xtx99@aol.com

I am not sure if your choice of paper is a proble or not. I have not
used Canon paper.

I normally use Ilford inkjet paper. I also don't really care for the
glossy finish paper, and I forget if it is called a luster or satin
finish. It just has a nicer finish to it then the glossy paper. I
have to drive 20 miles into Salt Lake to get this paper, so if I am in
a hurry I will get a different paper.

Another paper I use, and this is a bit strange - the Staples store
brand paper.
Prints seem to come out really nice on this paper, and I haven't had
problems with them fading over time.

The other paper that I will use if I am unable to get either of these
two papers is Epson paper.

I do not like HP paper! Ink tends to run and smear on HP paper, and
prints come out blurry.

There are other papers that you might want to try. I noticed that Fuji
is making a paper. Fuji is photo company, so their paper might be
okay. Kodak is making a paper, same story here. Canon is a camera
company, and makes cameras not photo paper. So I am not sure what
their paper would be like. There is also a company in Moab, Utah
called Moab Paper company. I have a sample package of their ink jet
paper somewhere I am supposed to try out.

Hamermill makes some ink jet photo papers. Hamermill is a good paper
company.
I have not tried their ink jet papers, but they do have some nice laser
papers.

So you may want to try a different photo paper then Canon and see it it
does better. I like the Ilford photo paper the best. It is just
really hard to find. You normally have to go to a professional photo
supply store to find it.

The next thing to keep ink jet prints from fading - you have to keep
them out of direct sunlight. If you put them in direct sunlight, they
will fade fast.
Six months and they are done. If you have a print hanging on your wall
that faces a window - the light from a window is killing your print.

The last thing - you need to spray an ink jet print with an ink jet
lacquer. This helps with the direct sunlight problem, but does not
solve it. You still need to be careful where you hang it. Not on a
wall facing a window.

I have used SureGuard as that is what Pictureline in Salt Lake carries.
I have also found something called McDonald's on the internet. Doing
a search on Froogle (Google's shopping search engine) comes up with a
couple other brands of Ink Jet Lacquer.

I would stay away from the Glossy Lacquer as it tends to come out in
globs and spot your prints.

You spray the print once in one direction, and then wait until it
dries, and then spray it in the other direction.

After that you can frame the print or mount it on foam board.

Do not put the print in plastic if you use the spray as it will stick
to the plastic sleeve.

Also, you still need to be carefull to try and keep the print out of
direct sunlight. What is breaking down your color is the UV rays.
The direct sun light is harmful to ink jet prints.

Hope this helps.

roland
Anonymous
August 16, 2005 10:55:50 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

SimonLW wrote:
> <xtx99@aol.com> wrote in message
> news:cf4bc$430190f9$d1cc581f$29407@snip.allthenewsgroups.com...
> > The photos I've printed from my very cheap Canon i470D inkjet have been
> > really great...but the print paper yellows terribly in just a few months.
> I
> > only use the best Canon paper and original Canon cartridges. Some of my
> > photos are put in clear plastic covers with magnets for the refridgerator.
> > My similarly covered commerically printed 35 mm shots which are over 12
> > years old are not yellowed at all. None of my photos are in direct
> > sunlight. Is anyone else experiencing this yellowing problem of Canon
> > paper?
> > xtx99@aol.com
> >
> >
> If it yellows in a few months, the paper may have a high acid/pulp content.
> If it is just the ones in the plastic covers, it could be some reaction with
> the plastic. Do you know the type of plastic? If the ones not in the plastic
> covers yellow as well, it could be just the paper.
> -S

Check the Canon Paper box to see if it say's Acid Free.
Also, check the plastic you are putting them in for the same thing -
Acid Free.

Acid and Sunlight will kill your prints.

roland
Related resources
Anonymous
August 16, 2005 1:16:54 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

<xtx99@aol.com> wrote in message
news:cf4bc$430190f9$d1cc581f$29407@snip.allthenewsgroups.com...
> The photos I've printed from my very cheap Canon i470D inkjet have been
> really great...but the print paper yellows terribly in just a few months.
I
> only use the best Canon paper and original Canon cartridges. Some of my
> photos are put in clear plastic covers with magnets for the refridgerator.
> My similarly covered commerically printed 35 mm shots which are over 12
> years old are not yellowed at all. None of my photos are in direct
> sunlight. Is anyone else experiencing this yellowing problem of Canon
> paper?
> xtx99@aol.com
>
>
If it yellows in a few months, the paper may have a high acid/pulp content.
If it is just the ones in the plastic covers, it could be some reaction with
the plastic. Do you know the type of plastic? If the ones not in the plastic
covers yellow as well, it could be just the paper.
-S
Anonymous
August 16, 2005 1:31:23 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

I am thinking it might be sunlight, acid and water...

The kitchen is a damp area of the house.
We don't know if the plastic holders the OP is putting the prints in
are acid free.
We also don't know if the print is getting hit by direct, or even
reflected sunlight.

I would try using a different plastic holder and make sure it says
"Acid Free" on it.
I would also spray the print with an ink jet spray to prevent the UV
rays from breaking down the print.
I would put the print in someplace that is not as damp as the kitchen,
and not in direct, or reflected (like from a mirror) sunlight.

See if that keeps the paper from turning yellow.

roland
Anonymous
August 16, 2005 1:52:08 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

<xtx99@aol.com> wrote in message
news:cf4bc$430190f9$d1cc581f$29407@snip.allthenewsgroups.com...
> The photos I've printed from my very cheap Canon i470D inkjet have been
> really great...but the print paper yellows terribly in just a few months.
I
> only use the best Canon paper and original Canon cartridges. Some of my
> photos are put in clear plastic covers with magnets for the refridgerator.
> My similarly covered commerically printed 35 mm shots which are over 12
> years old are not yellowed at all. None of my photos are in direct
> sunlight. Is anyone else experiencing this yellowing problem of Canon
> paper?
> xtx99@aol.com
>
>

I use Canon papers and have no yellowing problem whatsoever after 1-1/2
years. Some prints are stored, some thumbtacked over my desk in my office,
some mounted behind glass.

It might be your plastic covers, though I have a number of prints mounted in
those cheapie one-piece plastic frames at home. They, too, look as pristine
as the day I printed them.
Anonymous
August 16, 2005 2:07:54 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

CFB wrote:
> In article <cf4bc$430190f9$d1cc581f$29407@snip.allthenewsgroups.com>,
> <xtx99@aol.com> wrote:
>
> > The photos I've printed from my very cheap Canon i470D inkjet have been
> > really great...but the print paper yellows terribly in just a few months. I
> > only use the best Canon paper and original Canon cartridges. Some of my
> > photos are put in clear plastic covers with magnets for the refridgerator.
> > My similarly covered commerically printed 35 mm shots which are over 12
> > years old are not yellowed at all. None of my photos are in direct
> > sunlight. Is anyone else experiencing this yellowing problem of Canon
> > paper?
> > xtx99@aol.com
>
>
> http://bj.canon.co.jp/english/photopaper/knowpaper/know...
>
> 3. Ozone prevention
>
> Dye inks are harmed by ozone (colours will fade). Be sure not to place
> the printouts near a refrigerator or air conditioning (which are sources
> of ozone).
>
>
> Also film prints last 100+ years before fading.
>
> --
>
> http://home.nc.rr.com/christianbonanno/

Are the inks yellowing (probably ozone then, or is the paper yellowing.
If it is the back of the paper yellowing, get a better paper. Ilford is
good, Canon does make a premium paper, look into that. Canon inks are
dye based and they do have problems with ozone, when Epson had this
problem it was very regional. Refridgerators and copiers are ozone
sources. Do not use PVC or acetate picture covers. Polyethelene is the
way to go for covers.
Chemical photo prints don't have a 100 year life span, manufacturers
claim 60 or so years, Henry Wilhelm says less because they use half the
light and lower humidity than his testing. Also this is based on full
processing not accelerated processing you get with drug store prints,
this also lowers life expectancy. I'd figure 25-50 years for most
chemical prints, better than most dye inkjet prints but not as good as
pigment based ij prints or the new HP dyes. B&W silver prints are
almost indestructable if processed correctly.

Tom
Anonymous
August 16, 2005 6:27:56 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In article <cf4bc$430190f9$d1cc581f$29407@snip.allthenewsgroups.com>,
<xtx99@aol.com> wrote:

> The photos I've printed from my very cheap Canon i470D inkjet have been
> really great...but the print paper yellows terribly in just a few months. I
> only use the best Canon paper and original Canon cartridges. Some of my
> photos are put in clear plastic covers with magnets for the refridgerator.
> My similarly covered commerically printed 35 mm shots which are over 12
> years old are not yellowed at all. None of my photos are in direct
> sunlight. Is anyone else experiencing this yellowing problem of Canon
> paper?
> xtx99@aol.com


http://bj.canon.co.jp/english/photopaper/knowpaper/know...

3. Ozone prevention

Dye inks are harmed by ozone (colours will fade). Be sure not to place
the printouts near a refrigerator or air conditioning (which are sources
of ozone).


Also film prints last 100+ years before fading.

--

http://home.nc.rr.com/christianbonanno/
Anonymous
August 16, 2005 6:27:57 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

CFB wrote:

> http://bj.canon.co.jp/english/photopaper/knowpaper/know...
>
> 3. Ozone prevention
>
> Dye inks are harmed by ozone (colours will fade). Be sure not to place
> the printouts near a refrigerator or air conditioning (which are sources
> of ozone).


That addresses ink fading issues, not the yellowing of the paper.

FWIW, I have not had issues with Canon paper. I have a fewprintst aht
are over a year old and still look great.


--
E-mail fudged to thwart spammers.
Transpose the c's and a's in my e-mail address to reply.
Anonymous
August 16, 2005 8:28:22 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

kz8rt3 wrote:
> In article <1124212074.923545.200130@g47g2000cwa.googlegroups.com>,
> "tomm101" <monego@valley.net> wrote:
>
> > CFB wrote:
> > > In article <cf4bc$430190f9$d1cc581f$29407@snip.allthenewsgroups.com>,
> > > <xtx99@aol.com> wrote:
> > >
> > > > The photos I've printed from my very cheap Canon i470D inkjet have been
> > > > really great...but the print paper yellows terribly in just a few months.
> > > > I
> > > > only use the best Canon paper and original Canon cartridges. Some of my
> > > > photos are put in clear plastic covers with magnets for the
> > > > refridgerator.
> > > > My similarly covered commerically printed 35 mm shots which are over 12
> > > > years old are not yellowed at all. None of my photos are in direct
> > > > sunlight. Is anyone else experiencing this yellowing problem of Canon
> > > > paper?
> > > > xtx99@aol.com
> > >
> > >
> > > http://bj.canon.co.jp/english/photopaper/knowpaper/know...
> > >
> > > 3. Ozone prevention
> > >
> > > Dye inks are harmed by ozone (colours will fade). Be sure not to place
> > > the printouts near a refrigerator or air conditioning (which are sources
> > > of ozone).
> > >
> > >
> > > Also film prints last 100+ years before fading.
> > >
> > > --
> > >
> > > http://home.nc.rr.com/christianbonanno/
> >
> > Are the inks yellowing (probably ozone then, or is the paper yellowing.
> > If it is the back of the paper yellowing, get a better paper. Ilford is
> > good, Canon does make a premium paper, look into that. Canon inks are
> > dye based and they do have problems with ozone, when Epson had this
> > problem it was very regional. Refridgerators and copiers are ozone
> > sources. Do not use PVC or acetate picture covers. Polyethelene is the
> > way to go for covers.
> > Chemical photo prints don't have a 100 year life span, manufacturers
> > claim 60 or so years, Henry Wilhelm says less because they use half the
> > light and lower humidity than his testing. Also this is based on full
> > processing not accelerated processing you get with drug store prints,
> > this also lowers life expectancy. I'd figure 25-50 years for most
> > chemical prints, better than most dye inkjet prints but not as good as
> > pigment based ij prints or the new HP dyes. B&W silver prints are
> > almost indestructable if processed correctly.
> >
> > Tom
>
> Yeah, fiber based black and white prints have 100+ years of life in
> them. Sorry I did not elaborate. You talk about what you are used to.
> Color fades more quickly due to more metals and that is where the 60
> year figure comes from.
>
> How does inkjet do with water?

Latest pigmented inks are supposed to be water resistant when dried.
The long lived HP dyes aren't so good. Though dyes can be used on a
water resistant paper.

Tom
Anonymous
August 17, 2005 1:46:20 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In article <1124212074.923545.200130@g47g2000cwa.googlegroups.com>,
"tomm101" <monego@valley.net> wrote:

> CFB wrote:
> > In article <cf4bc$430190f9$d1cc581f$29407@snip.allthenewsgroups.com>,
> > <xtx99@aol.com> wrote:
> >
> > > The photos I've printed from my very cheap Canon i470D inkjet have been
> > > really great...but the print paper yellows terribly in just a few months.
> > > I
> > > only use the best Canon paper and original Canon cartridges. Some of my
> > > photos are put in clear plastic covers with magnets for the
> > > refridgerator.
> > > My similarly covered commerically printed 35 mm shots which are over 12
> > > years old are not yellowed at all. None of my photos are in direct
> > > sunlight. Is anyone else experiencing this yellowing problem of Canon
> > > paper?
> > > xtx99@aol.com
> >
> >
> > http://bj.canon.co.jp/english/photopaper/knowpaper/know...
> >
> > 3. Ozone prevention
> >
> > Dye inks are harmed by ozone (colours will fade). Be sure not to place
> > the printouts near a refrigerator or air conditioning (which are sources
> > of ozone).
> >
> >
> > Also film prints last 100+ years before fading.
> >
> > --
> >
> > http://home.nc.rr.com/christianbonanno/
>
> Are the inks yellowing (probably ozone then, or is the paper yellowing.
> If it is the back of the paper yellowing, get a better paper. Ilford is
> good, Canon does make a premium paper, look into that. Canon inks are
> dye based and they do have problems with ozone, when Epson had this
> problem it was very regional. Refridgerators and copiers are ozone
> sources. Do not use PVC or acetate picture covers. Polyethelene is the
> way to go for covers.
> Chemical photo prints don't have a 100 year life span, manufacturers
> claim 60 or so years, Henry Wilhelm says less because they use half the
> light and lower humidity than his testing. Also this is based on full
> processing not accelerated processing you get with drug store prints,
> this also lowers life expectancy. I'd figure 25-50 years for most
> chemical prints, better than most dye inkjet prints but not as good as
> pigment based ij prints or the new HP dyes. B&W silver prints are
> almost indestructable if processed correctly.
>
> Tom

Yeah, fiber based black and white prints have 100+ years of life in
them. Sorry I did not elaborate. You talk about what you are used to.
Color fades more quickly due to more metals and that is where the 60
year figure comes from.

How does inkjet do with water?
Anonymous
August 17, 2005 1:19:58 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

CFB wrote:
>
<snip>

> Also film prints last 100+ years before fading.

Not likely. The paper with the best longevity prognosis under test
conditions is Fuji Crystal Archive, and that paper has a projected life
circa 45 to 60 years, and that is under dark conditions.

Epson pigment ink prints are rated at 100 years, better than any wet
process papers.

Colin D.
Anonymous
August 17, 2005 1:19:59 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

In article <4302587E.49CE5BDC@killspam.127.0.0.1>,
Colin D <ColinD@killspam.127.0.0.1> wrote:

> CFB wrote:
> >
> <snip>
>
> > Also film prints last 100+ years before fading.
>
> Not likely. The paper with the best longevity prognosis under test
> conditions is Fuji Crystal Archive, and that paper has a projected life
> circa 45 to 60 years, and that is under dark conditions.
>
> Epson pigment ink prints are rated at 100 years, better than any wet
> process papers.
>
> Colin D.

Sorry, corrected in another post. B&W on fiber (or not) lasts 100+ years.
August 17, 2005 7:08:40 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

tomm101 wrote:

>>How does inkjet do with water?
>
>
> Latest pigmented inks are supposed to be water resistant when dried.
> The long lived HP dyes aren't so good. Though dyes can be used on a
> water resistant paper.
>
They are remarkable. On Epson premium gloss / semi gloss paper, I can
rub the surface vigorously with a damp cloth to clean them with no
visible damage. I didn't realise this until I had to clean a print that
got grubby when I was framing it - I thought it was headed for bin 13,
and only tried wiping it wet as a last resort. It obviously isn't going
to be the same with matte papers, but if they get damp, they won't bleed.
Dyes can be used on the same "fast dry" paper - but then you are back to
the problem that the prints will fade quickly unless you use swellable
polymer paper.
Anonymous
August 17, 2005 10:19:16 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

xtx99@aol.com wrote:
> The photos I've printed from my very cheap Canon i470D inkjet have been
> really great...but the print paper yellows terribly in just a few months. I
> only use the best Canon paper and original Canon cartridges. Some of my
> photos are put in clear plastic covers with magnets for the refridgerator.
> My similarly covered commerically printed 35 mm shots which are over 12
> years old are not yellowed at all. None of my photos are in direct
> sunlight. Is anyone else experiencing this yellowing problem of Canon
> paper?
> xtx99@aol.com
>
>
I've got a slightly different problem... but similar. I used Canon inks
with a S9000 and Canon glossy paper to put out a sepia print. It looked
great hanging on the wall. After a few months the children have a yellow
fringe / halo around them .... about 1,5mm wide so far and it appears to
be broadening.
Bernard

Have switched to a satin finish paper and will see what happens.
Anonymous
August 20, 2005 3:59:40 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On 17-Aug-05 09:19, Bernard Rother wrote:
> xtx99@aol.com wrote:
>
>> The photos I've printed from my very cheap Canon i470D inkjet have
>> been really great...but the print paper yellows terribly in just a few
>> months. I only use the best Canon paper and original Canon
>> cartridges. Some of my photos are put in clear plastic covers with
>> magnets for the refridgerator. My similarly covered commerically
>> printed 35 mm shots which are over 12 years old are not yellowed at
>> all. None of my photos are in direct sunlight. Is anyone else
>> experiencing this yellowing problem of Canon paper?
>> xtx99@aol.com
>>
> I've got a slightly different problem... but similar. I used Canon inks
> with a S9000 and Canon glossy paper to put out a sepia print. It looked
> great hanging on the wall. After a few months the children have a yellow
> fringe / halo around them .... about 1,5mm wide so far and it appears to
> be broadening.
> Bernard
>
> Have switched to a satin finish paper and will see what happens.

I have encountered also drastic fading of prints on Canon Photo Paper
Plus with my S9000.

The problem with Canon is that they decline any responsibility.
They claim now that their durability estimation of 28 years is
valid for Photo Paper Pro only, the 4-layer paper, and only in
some conditions, what includes putting your image behind glass.

Let me think: I shall pay so much for glossy paper and hide the
gloss behind a glass, Yea right. Anyway, these are my examples:

http://www.pbase.com/phototalk_thh/2004_10_12_s9000_fad...

My recommendation: Take an Epson, use pigment inks. Both
R1800 and R2400 are magnificent.

Thomas
!