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enlarging icons on drop-down menus

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Anonymous
April 5, 2005 3:27:03 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.customize (More info?)

i am running xp prof sp2 and am trying to enlarge the icons that are to the
left of text in a drop down menu i.e. the favorites menu in internet
explorer. i can enlarge the text on the menu going through the display
properties, but am not having any luck getting the actual icons to enlarge.
any suggestions or ideas would be greatly appreciated!!
Anonymous
May 17, 2005 8:30:23 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.customize (More info?)

bawwood wrote:
> i am running xp prof sp2 and am trying to enlarge the icons that are
> to the left of text in a drop down menu i.e. the favorites menu in
> internet explorer. i can enlarge the text on the menu going through
> the display properties, but am not having any luck getting the actual
> icons to enlarge. any suggestions or ideas would be greatly
> appreciated!!

I do not believe that this change in icon size can be accomplished within
Windows. While the Dislpay Properties found in Control Panel can change the
size of Desktop and Taskbar icons, I, like you, have only been able to
change the size of the text in drop-down menus.
There may be a way to accomplish what you want through third party software.
Anonymous
May 18, 2005 6:24:58 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.customize (More info?)

Can a setting be amended in the registry or some system file to enlarge the
icons?


"T. Waters" <@$%$%#^@jdjgkl.com> wrote in message
news:uK19DizWFHA.2080@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
> bawwood wrote:
>> i am running xp prof sp2 and am trying to enlarge the icons that are
>> to the left of text in a drop down menu i.e. the favorites menu in
>> internet explorer. i can enlarge the text on the menu going through
>> the display properties, but am not having any luck getting the actual
>> icons to enlarge. any suggestions or ideas would be greatly
>> appreciated!!
>
> I do not believe that this change in icon size can be accomplished within
> Windows. While the Dislpay Properties found in Control Panel can change
> the
> size of Desktop and Taskbar icons, I, like you, have only been able to
> change the size of the text in drop-down menus.
> There may be a way to accomplish what you want through third party
> software.
>
>
Related resources
Anonymous
May 18, 2005 11:29:00 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.customize (More info?)

On Wed, 18 May 2005 14:24:58 -0700, ForestSpirit wrote:

> Can a setting be amended in the registry or some system file to enlarge the
> icons?

No.
--
Sharon F
MS-MVP ~ Windows Shell/User
Anonymous
May 19, 2005 5:01:10 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.customize (More info?)

Sharon F wrote:
> On Wed, 18 May 2005 14:24:58 -0700, ForestSpirit wrote:
>
>
>>Can a setting be amended in the registry or some system file to enlarge the
>>icons?
>
>
> No.

Or?

If someone wants to find out what one *can* do? The whole truth and
nothing but the truth...

Probably, yes. One *can* maniputate settings, icons and more.

You can do quite a lot with most *icons* (or wreck everything) - With a
free app.

So it is with no small risk you go *there*. I did not say you were
*qualified* - But many tools exist (to do good or harm).

Here's one:

http://www.pt.lu/comnet/desc/reshacker.html

Resource Hacker™ has been designed to:

1. View resources in Win32 executable files
(*.exe, *.dll, *.cpl, *.ocx) and in Win32
resource files (*.res) in both their compiled
and decompiled formats.

2. Extract (save) resources to file in:
*.res format; as a binary; or as decompiled
resource scripts or images.
Icons, bitmaps, cursors, menus, dialogs,
string tables, message tables, accelerators,
Borland forms and version info resources can
be fully decompiled into their respective
formats, whether as image files or *.rc text
files.

3. Modify (rename or replace) resources in
executables. Image resources (icons, cursors
and bitmaps) can be replaced with an image from
a corresponding image file (*.ico, *.cur, *.bmp),
a *.res file or even another *.exe file.
Dialogs, menus, stringtables, accelerators and
messagetable resource scripts (and also Borland
forms) can be edited and recompiled using the
internal resource script editor.
Resources can also be replaced with resources
from a *.res file as long as the replacement
resource is of the same type and has the same
name.

4. Add new resources to executables.
Enable a program to support multiple languages,
or add a custom icon or bitmap (company logo
etc) to a program's dialog.

5. Delete resources.
Most compilers add resources into applications
which are never used by the application.
Removing these unused resources can reduce an
application's size.
Anonymous
May 19, 2005 2:55:13 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.customize (More info?)

On Thu, 19 May 2005 01:01:10 GMT, Slip Kid wrote:

> So it is with no small risk you go *there*. I did not say you were
> *qualified* - But many tools exist (to do good or harm).

I realize and acknowledge your points. However, this question was in
regards to adjusting the size of icons within drop down lists. And the
follow up question that I responded to was asking if there was a related
registry setting to tweak. There is not any that I know of.

I have seen programs that are "overlays" to various dialogs that include
drop down lists. At the moment, I am using one that is a beta product but
not available to the general public. Common Dialog procedure is accessed
but then enhanced with an additional process. Many aspects, including size
of icons, text and even the dialog window is configurable. A very nice and
useful tool and so far it's compatible with all of the programs that I use.
Sure wish this product would get off the testing shelf and into the
public's reach...

Because there is potential interaction between a program and basic common
dialog controls (thinking of MS Office's unique dialogs here), I'm not sure
tweaking system files with Reshack is the way to go. As you say, YMMV.

--
Sharon F
MS-MVP ~ Windows Shell/User
Anonymous
May 19, 2005 11:32:36 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.customize (More info?)

Sharon F wrote:
> On Thu, 19 May 2005 01:01:10 GMT, Slip Kid wrote:
>
>
>>So it is with no small risk you go *there*. I did not say you were
>>*qualified* - But many tools exist (to do good or harm).
>
>
> I realize and acknowledge your points. However, this question was in
> regards to adjusting the size of icons within drop down lists. And the
> follow up question that I responded to was asking if there was a related
> registry setting to tweak. There is not any that I know of.

Well, the subject line should have been my clue...You are correct.

I was responding to a slew of other questions (spattered about) which
could be answered by this type of software.
>
> I have seen programs that are "overlays" to various dialogs that include
> drop down lists. At the moment, I am using one that is a beta product but
> not available to the general public. Common Dialog procedure is accessed
> but then enhanced with an additional process. Many aspects, including size
> of icons, text and even the dialog window is configurable. A very nice and
> useful tool and so far it's compatible with all of the programs that I use.

Is this an MS product or would it be a third party tool?

> Sure wish this product would get off the testing shelf and into the
> public's reach...

I ask because it appears that MS is reluctant or overly cautious in
providing users tools to alter the look and feel of the desktop.

Yes, one can do it on an icon by icon basis without resorting to a third
party - - But it appears the "theme" idea (as presented by MS) limits
what one can do within "Properties". It appears your project would
answer my next questions...

On one hand it's been great to allow the aftermarket an opening to sell
applications to change the "look"? Not all of them are equally safe and
it seems MS would prefer (if people were going to be crossing that line)
a more integrated way to modify "themes".

> Because there is potential interaction between a program and basic common
> dialog controls (thinking of MS Office's unique dialogs here), I'm not sure
> tweaking system files with Reshack is the way to go. As you say, YMMV.

Correct - I did not focus strictly on the "menu".

Anyway-------------

Even with all the theme manipulation and some understanding of how to
change the bitmaps, sizes of the visual elements and the parts or the
layout? Do I have to wait for your project to take the next step,below:

It is still not clear to me (you could point me to a source) which
displays are goverened by which font (size) - - and if one can
micromange the size beyond the "Properties\Advanced" route.

Some choices are quite clear? The active or inactive title bar - Obvious
enough what it controls. But is "each" font display on the desktop able
to be changed or do "some" share attributes, even at the lowest levels
of access.

As I run a high-res screen -- I must increace the size of the fonts for
some font displays-- Which leaves me stuck with too large fonts (for
example) in my right-click-drop down - - and I have many features there
which scroll forever. Clearly, the "Advanced" properties are more
specific for some options than others?

So, for the options which seem to be too broadly applied -- Is there a
way to designate a specific font size to individual displays?
Or do some displays "share" properties - leaving me with a too large/too
small result - - if the same size is applied to the multiple displays?

I hope that's clear!
Anonymous
May 19, 2005 11:32:37 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.customize (More info?)

On Thu, 19 May 2005 19:32:36 GMT, Slip Kid wrote:

> Is this an MS product or would it be a third party tool?

It's a third party tool.

In general, for customizing I like the offerings from stardock.com
(relatively stable; constant and ongoing development; good support).
Besides a desktop, I have a tablet PC and have used many of their tools for
creating a desktop space that is more easily navigated with pen input
native to this platform.

> I ask because it appears that MS is reluctant or overly cautious in
> providing users tools to alter the look and feel of the desktop.

During XP's testing there were more themes available. Supposedly dropped
due to compatibility -apparently a case of "change a bit of code over here
and it breaks a bit of code over there." So in the end, XP shipped with
Classic and XP Theme (and this in 3 colors only). True story? No idea but
sounds plausible that the dividing line for some customizations would be
potential support costs.

> [snippage; sorry!] So, for the options which seem to be too broadly applied -- Is there a
> way to designate a specific font size to individual displays?
> Or do some displays "share" properties - leaving me with a too large/too
> small result - - if the same size is applied to the multiple displays?

Not that I know of. Although it's awkward, different desktop sizes can be
used with many extended desktops - using XP settings or options supplied by
display drivers. Again, some third party programs come to the rescue
allowing saved/customized desktops and these can be directed to any monitor
in a multi-monitor setup.

The fact remains, monitors and desktop sizes are getting larger. Objects
and text are becoming impossibly smaller. While much can be done to aid in
resizing and viewing there are various nooks and crannies of the shell that
are in definite need of attention and that need to be brought up to speed.

--
Sharon F
MS-MVP ~ Windows Shell/User
Anonymous
May 20, 2005 4:15:35 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.customize (More info?)

Sharon F wrote:
> On Thu, 19 May 2005 19:32:36 GMT, Slip Kid wrote:
>
>
>>Is this an MS product or would it be a third party tool?
>
>
> It's a third party tool.
>
> In general, for customizing I like the offerings from stardock.com
> (relatively stable; constant and ongoing development; good support).
> Besides a desktop, I have a tablet PC and have used many of their tools for
> creating a desktop space that is more easily navigated with pen input
> native to this platform.

I read there were some dangers in using the hacked theme .dll?

So, I chose a more laborious route and cloned a profile and went to work
on the individual bitmaps. It wasn't too bad once I had my basic colors
down. It's been up for a few weeks and seems fine. I have the old
profile to fallback on if something goes wrong with this.

Actually I don't know that I'm clear about the differences between
Windowshdes, the Style XP route and the hacked .dll (same as the later?)

>>I ask because it appears that MS is reluctant or overly cautious in
>>providing users tools to alter the look and feel of the desktop.
>
>
> During XP's testing there were more themes available. Supposedly dropped
> due to compatibility -apparently a case of "change a bit of code over here
> and it breaks a bit of code over there." So in the end, XP shipped with
> Classic and XP Theme (and this in 3 colors only). True story? No idea but
> sounds plausible that the dividing line for some customizations would be
> potential support costs.

It wasn't *more* themes which I was referring to - - Rather giving the
user the tools or options to modify the existing themes. My goal isn't
"fahion" - - Rather, I prefer a cleaner, more utilitarian screen. Less.
rather than more. I used the classic style till I decided I could
"strip" the theme down to a more basic look.

>>[snippage; sorry!] So, for the options which seem to be too broadly applied -- Is there a
>>way to designate a specific font size to individual displays?
>>Or do some displays "share" properties - leaving me with a too large/too
>>small result - - if the same size is applied to the multiple displays?

> Not that I know of. Although it's awkward, different desktop sizes can be
> used with many extended desktops - using XP settings or options supplied by
> display drivers. Again, some third party programs come to the rescue
> allowing saved/customized desktops and these can be directed to any monitor
> in a multi-monitor setup.

I went to the different shell folders in the registry and eliminated a
bunch of entries. I had many apps placing things there which I wasn't
using. Now the menu fits on the screen - -even though it's a larger
font than I *need*.

> The fact remains, monitors and desktop sizes are getting larger. Objects
> and text are becoming impossibly smaller. While much can be done to aid in
> resizing and viewing there are various nooks and crannies of the shell that
> are in definite need of attention and that need to be brought up to speed.

Yeah, I've noticed that apps which allow for their own "skinning" are
beginning to offer ways to work around the limits of the Window's styles.
Anonymous
May 20, 2005 3:14:51 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.customize (More info?)

On Fri, 20 May 2005 00:15:35 GMT, Slip Kid wrote:

> I read there were some dangers in using the hacked theme .dll?
>
> So, I chose a more laborious route and cloned a profile and went to work
> on the individual bitmaps. It wasn't too bad once I had my basic colors
> down. It's been up for a few weeks and seems fine. I have the old
> profile to fallback on if something goes wrong with this.
>
> Actually I don't know that I'm clear about the differences between
> Windowshdes, the Style XP route and the hacked .dll (same as the later?)

I tried this route before using Stardock's programs. Well, sort of tried
it. Didn't use the the hacked .dll approach and had a paid version of XP
Styles. Instead of an outright replacement of the system .dll, the paid
version unloads the XP version and loads its own during the startup
process.

For the most this worked fine. However, the silent service added by XP
Styles interfered with one of my disk utilities. Weighing the benefits of
which was more important - a little color variety over file integrity - I
stopped using XP Styles. There were some other little problems but these
were caused more by flawed skins than any problem with the XP Styles
approach to skinning.

WindowBlinds doesn't replace any system files. It implements code in
Windows to enable its skins. A cleaner approach, I think. I've seen some
folks complain of performance with these programs (Stardock offers more
than just Windows Blinds) but after a year of using them, have not run into
any problems of that kind.

I'm not into "fashion" either. I don't run fancy skins but the 3 colors for
XP themes grate my nerves. The Stardock solution works for me and provides
a simplified desktop for the tablet (accommodates landscape and portrait
view with quick links to system and file tools).

From the sounds of it, you've found a solution that works well for you too
and that is a good thing. :) 

--
Sharon F
MS-MVP ~ Windows Shell/User
Anonymous
July 6, 2005 3:22:06 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.customize (More info?)

A very interesting thread. I was going to ask about a minor gripe/problem I
have with my Active Theme (modified) desktop. In it, the disk space and
calendar are displayed correctly on the right side of the screen, but how do
I get the e-mail icon do anything, i.e., repsond to new messages etc from
Outlook 2003?

z.entropic

"Sharon F" wrote:

> On Thu, 19 May 2005 19:32:36 GMT, Slip Kid wrote:
>
> > Is this an MS product or would it be a third party tool?
>
> It's a third party tool.
>
> In general, for customizing I like the offerings from stardock.com
> (relatively stable; constant and ongoing development; good support).
> Besides a desktop, I have a tablet PC and have used many of their tools for
> creating a desktop space that is more easily navigated with pen input
> native to this platform.
>
> > I ask because it appears that MS is reluctant or overly cautious in
> > providing users tools to alter the look and feel of the desktop.
>
> During XP's testing there were more themes available. Supposedly dropped
> due to compatibility -apparently a case of "change a bit of code over here
> and it breaks a bit of code over there." So in the end, XP shipped with
> Classic and XP Theme (and this in 3 colors only). True story? No idea but
> sounds plausible that the dividing line for some customizations would be
> potential support costs.
>
> > [snippage; sorry!] So, for the options which seem to be too broadly applied -- Is there a
> > way to designate a specific font size to individual displays?
> > Or do some displays "share" properties - leaving me with a too large/too
> > small result - - if the same size is applied to the multiple displays?
>
> Not that I know of. Although it's awkward, different desktop sizes can be
> used with many extended desktops - using XP settings or options supplied by
> display drivers. Again, some third party programs come to the rescue
> allowing saved/customized desktops and these can be directed to any monitor
> in a multi-monitor setup.
>
> The fact remains, monitors and desktop sizes are getting larger. Objects
> and text are becoming impossibly smaller. While much can be done to aid in
> resizing and viewing there are various nooks and crannies of the shell that
> are in definite need of attention and that need to be brought up to speed.
>
> --
> Sharon F
> MS-MVP ~ Windows Shell/User
>
!