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Windows xp oem upgraded to windows 8 retail

Last response: in Windows 8
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January 26, 2013 7:01:25 PM

Hey, I'm wondering how the licensing deal works if I were to couple an XP oem license with a Windows 8 Upgrade Retail license.
For instance: I have xp oem installed on my current machine. If I were to build a completely new machine and try to install that xp oem license, it wouldn't work because its a 100% different machine, right? But what if I were to install that xp oem on the new pc, and then use a Windows 8 upgrade retail version to upgrade it, would that kind of overwrite my xp's oem license that would normally restrict it to my original pc?
I'm interested in completely abandoning my current mobo, so I'd like to be able to use my xp oem license without being restricted in what new mobo I may choose.

Would I need a retail version of XP instead?
Thanks for any input.
a b * Windows 8
January 26, 2013 10:45:09 PM

"If I use a Windows 8 Upgrade disc/download to upgrade my Windows 7 computer to Windows 8, can I then use my old Windows 7 disc and product key to install Windows 7 on another computer?"

No. The Windows 8 Upgrade license replaces the previous Windows 7 (or Windows Vista or Windows XP) license.

To be clear: your old version of Windows that you upgraded from can no longer be used on your current, or any other, computer.

pcsupport.com
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a b * Windows 8
January 26, 2013 10:46:00 PM

OEM versions of Windows 7 are identical to Full License Retail versions except for the following:

- OEM versions do not offer any free Microsoft direct support from Microsoft support personnel

- OEM licenses are tied to the very first computer you install and activate it on

- OEM versions allow all hardware upgrades except for an upgrade to a different model motherboard

- OEM versions cannot be used to directly upgrade from an older Windows operating system


Microsoft.com ^


OEM vs. Retail

OEM Windows 7 comes preinstalled on computers. This is the cheapest way to buy windows. Large PC manufacturers like Dell, HP etc. (collectively called royalty OEMs) install windows on millions of such PCs. The main characteristics of such systems are:

The license agreement and support agreement is between you and the PC maker, not MS.

Activation by the end user is not required. Windows is preactivated at the factory by the OEM using images and standard SLP keys.

Your copy of windows is locked to that PC. The license is not transferable.

OEM system builder is what you get when you buy from say Newegg or from a local "white box" vendor. It too has the characteristics of Royalty OEM windows. Although it is possible for an individual to buy a System Builder copy, the license requires that the software be installed using the OPK (OEM preinstall kit) and then resold.

Retail version is what you buy from a retailer like Amazon or Bestbuy. Its a full price version that comes packaged in a retail box with a retail product key. It has to be activated online via MS servers using the key on the box, it is not tied to the PC it was first installed on, though it can only be used on a single computer at a time. And, MS directly provides the support for it. It is also more expensive than OEM copies.

As far as functionality is concerned, theres no difference between any of the versions above, given any specific edition (i.e. between OEM pro and retail pro, or between OEM ultimate and retail ultimate).

sevenforums.com

Windows 8 OEM is a whole different ballgame.

License agreement for the transfer of a Windows 8 license
http://personaluselicense.windows.com/en-US/default.asp...
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a b * Windows 8
January 26, 2013 10:52:47 PM

Could you not use windows 8 to upgrade your current XP machine first.
Then you would be running on a windows 8 retail license and should be able to freely transfer it to your new pc.
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January 27, 2013 2:49:20 PM

geofelt said:
Could you not use windows 8 to upgrade your current XP machine first.
Then you would be running on a windows 8 retail license and should be able to freely transfer it to your new pc.


Thats a good question. I'd like to know that as well.
So basically if I were to use my current xp oem as a base for a windows 8 upgrade, the windows 8 license would consume the xp oem and make them intangible?

How would I transfer such a setup to a new pc? Does it involve creating an iso disk and then using that on a new pc?
Is there no simple way I could just use my xp oem on a new pc (perhaps without going online and validating the key?) and then upgrade it to win8? Do I have do some bizarre hdd ghost and transfer?

Sorry if these questions don't make complete sense. I'm kinda muddled from a cold.
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January 27, 2013 3:04:36 PM

I am just waiting for a new HDD for my laptop which should be here tomorrow and I will then be installing Win 8 Pro. I purchased the upgrade version of Win 8 Pro but have been told that I do not actually need an OS on the HDD and that the Win 8 ISO which I downloaded is actually a full version. I am lead to believe the testing for having a valid previous OS is done at the point of purchase and not when you install and the product key will work on a fresh install. If this all turns out to be true it might make life easier for you to do something similar.
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January 27, 2013 3:46:02 PM

sizzling said:
I am just waiting for a new HDD for my laptop which should be here tomorrow and I will then be installing Win 8 Pro. I purchased the upgrade version of Win 8 Pro but have been told that I do not actually need an OS on the HDD and that the Win 8 ISO which I downloaded is actually a full version. I am lead to believe the testing for having a valid previous OS is done at the point of purchase and not when you install and the product key will work on a fresh install. If this all turns out to be true it might make life easier for you to do something similar.


Yes, please keep me updated on that :) 
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a b * Windows 8
January 27, 2013 3:48:10 PM

Important: You can only install Windows 8 (clean install or upgrade install) using an upgrade license if you currently have a copy of Windows 8, Windows 7, Windows Vista, or Windows XP installed on the computer. True, the clean install process involves removing that operating system, but it still has to be there when the Windows 8 setup process begins. Upgrade licenses are less expensive than full licenses because you're getting a break as a previous Windows customer.
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a b * Windows 8
January 27, 2013 10:38:42 PM

I really do not think that confirmation of a qualifying previous os is done at purchase time.
I can't imagine how that could work.

I think yes, all windows dvd's are exactly the same, and contain all the options.
Apart from 32 bit and 64 bit versions, it is the activation key that identifies oem, upgrade, or retail.
I think if the clean install can detect that a qualifying os is present, even if it is not running, then the upgrade product key can be successfully activated.

If the old hard drive were detected, by being present, or even attached via a usb attached external enclosure, I would think you would be good.

One question perhaps SR-71 Blackbird can answer:
What is involved in invalidating the old license? Is this recorded in some MS activation database?
How do they handle products like the windows 7 family pack which includes the provision for 3 windows 7 copies?
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a b * Windows 8
January 27, 2013 11:07:58 PM

Is this recorded in some MS activation database? < the previous license is nullified in the microsoft database,and is no longer valid.
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