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How's My First Build?

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July 20, 2012 2:30:14 PM

Looking to build a decent gaming PC, want to play games like Battlefield, Starcraft 2, Crysis, Metro 2033, etc. Budget not hard set, but would like to keep it in the low to mid $1000 range. Really would like to make it as upgradable as possible for any upgrades in the future. Thanks!

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($189.99 @ Microcenter)
Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-Z77X-UD5H-WB ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($209.99 @ eCost)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance 8GB (1 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($54.99 @ Newegg)
Hard Drive: Samsung Spinpoint F3 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($88.86 @ Outlet PC)
Video Card: MSI Radeon HD 7950 3GB Video Card ($309.99 @ Newegg)
Case: Rosewill BlackHawk ATX Mid Tower Case ($89.99 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: Corsair 750W ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($134.99 @ Amazon)
Optical Drive: Lite-On ihes112-04 Blu-Ray Reader, DVD/CD Writer ($48.98 @ Newegg)
Monitor: Asus VH238H 23.0" Monitor ($159.98 @ NCIX US)
Total: $1287.76
(Prices include shipping and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2012-07-20 10:19 EDT-0400)

More about : build

July 20, 2012 2:38:39 PM

Do you really need the UD5H? The ASRock Extreme 4 is almost $150 less, considering you can bundle it with the i5-3570k at Micro Center. It also offers many of the same features, which is why I think it is a better choice.
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July 20, 2012 2:41:42 PM

diddypat67 said:
Looking to build a decent gaming PC. Budget not hard set, but would like to keep it in the low to mid $1000 range. Really would like to make it as upgradable as possible for any upgrades in the future. Thanks!

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($189.99 @ Microcenter)
Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-Z77X-UD5H-WB ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($209.99 @ eCost)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance 8GB (1 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($54.99 @ Newegg)
Hard Drive: Samsung Spinpoint F3 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($88.86 @ Outlet PC)
Video Card: MSI Radeon HD 7950 3GB Video Card ($309.99 @ Newegg)
Case: Rosewill BlackHawk ATX Mid Tower Case ($89.99 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: Corsair 750W ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($134.99 @ Amazon)
Optical Drive: Lite-On ihes112-04 Blu-Ray Reader, DVD/CD Writer ($48.98 @ Newegg)
Monitor: Asus VH238H 23.0" Monitor ($159.98 @ NCIX US)
Total: $1287.76
(Prices include shipping and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2012-07-20 10:19 EDT-0400)


Good build so far!

But there are a couple prices you could lower. If you get a ud5h mobo on microcenter and bundle it with 3570k, the ud5h goes down in price to 139.99, which is over $70 savings. As an alternative you could pick up an ASRock Extreme4 on microcenter, which if you bundle with the 3570k, is priced at 89.99. Which is an insane price for that board seeing as it is has more internal I/O connectors than the ud5h. I have the ASRock and can easily say its the best board ive ever owned.

Also you could pick up a PC Power and Cooling MK silencer II 750W on newegg with a mail in rebate that lowers the price to $89.99. Its a fantastic powrr supply for a great price.

Finally i would take those savings an invest in a GTX 670, which destroys the 7950 in all tests and even the 7970 on some tests too. Its running around 399.99 on newegg right now, but its worth every penny.
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July 20, 2012 2:49:12 PM

Dupontrocks11 said:
Finally i would take those savings an invest in a GTX 670, which destroys the 7950 in all tests and even the 7970 on some tests too. Its running around 399.99 on newegg right now, but its worth every penny.

Actually, a heavily overclocked 7950 offers just as much performance as a stock 670, though obviously once they are both overclocked, the 670 wins by a fair margin, though less than if they are both at stock.
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July 20, 2012 2:57:50 PM

Merueth said:
Actually, a heavily overclocked 7950 offers just as much performance as a stock 670, though obviously once they are both overclocked, the 670 wins by a fair margin, though less than if they are both at stock.


But you also need to take into consideration the skill level of the builder. Someone who is building their first system would be much better off getting the performance they want on stock clocks than having to overclock for them.
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July 20, 2012 2:58:56 PM

Thanks for the quick responses! I went with the UD5H because it includes the wifi and bluetooth which I will be using. Didn't know about the bundle so I will have to look into that. Went with the 7950 mainly for the price as it is nearly $100 cheaper right now than the 670 and fairly close performance wise. Went with the Corsair PSU because I've heard great things about the company, and I also wanted my PSU to be modular.
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July 20, 2012 3:18:38 PM

Don't get a wifi motherboard, they are way overpriced. You're much better off getting a ~$10 USB wireless adapter than pay an extra $50 for onboard wifi.
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July 20, 2012 3:18:46 PM

diddypat67 said:
Thanks for the quick responses! I went with the UD5H because it includes the wifi and bluetooth which I will be using. Didn't know about the bundle so I will have to look into that. Went with the 7950 mainly for the price as it is nearly $100 cheaper right now than the 670 and fairly close performance wise. Went with the Corsair PSU because I've heard great things about the company, and I also wanted my PSU to be modular.


I do like the ud5h because of its dual bios which is a life saver during overclocking. And
Considering the $50 price drop that AMD just introduced, it makes it even harder to recommend the 670 over the 7950. But nevertheless if you have any extra money, get the gtx 670.

Also you could wait to buy until mid august when the gtx 660 TI comes out as Nvidia will almost certainly drop the prices on all the cards.

PSUs are generally deemed as good because of their manufacturer. Seasonic is THE best PSU manufacturer there is so when a company builds a power supply and it is manufactured by seasonic, we can assume its good. It happens that the Corsair psu and the PCPC psu are both made by seasonic. Also, as for the modular aspect, if you have a full tower, you can store the cords behind the motherboard, and save a bunch of money on a non modular power supply. Also, non modular PSUs supply more reliable power for a longer time than modular.
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