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New build for gaming please help.

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July 20, 2012 3:54:31 PM

This is a new build that I'am going to use purely for gaming and if the community could help with the following, as always, would be much appreciated. My budget is £700- £800 ($1200)

.Will this system work and what do you think of it?
.Am I getting the best for my budget?
.Will the PSU allow me to add another 560 Ti in the future?

CPU: http://www.novatech.co.uk/products/components/processor...

Motherboard: http://www.novatech.co.uk/products/components/motherboa...

Memory: http://www.novatech.co.uk/products/components/memory-pc...

Hard Drive: http://www.novatech.co.uk/products/components/harddrive...
Video Card:

Case: http://www.novatech.co.uk/products/components/cases/cas...

Power Supply: http://www.novatech.co.uk/products/components/powersupp...

Optical Drive: http://www.novatech.co.uk/products/components/opticaldr...

Graphics http://www.novatech.co.uk/products/components/nvidiagef...

I have assurances that the PSU is sound, but any suggestions would be helpful.

More about : build gaming

a b 4 Gaming
July 20, 2012 4:29:25 PM

To answer your questions:

It will work, but you can do better.

Not best for your budget.

Yes, but would you want to?
-----------------------------------------------------------
My thoughts:

The critical component for gamers is the graphics card, more so than the cpu.

In this case, your budget is #160/#170. Sorry, my keyboard is retarded regarding pounds:( 

You would game better with a 2120@#90 and a 7870 @#230.

Or, a 2550K @#173 and a GTX670 for #300 would ba about as good as it gets.
You get the idea.

Here are my thoughts on
Dual graphics cards vs. a good single card.

a) How good do you really need to be?
A single GTX560 or 6870 can give you great performance at 1920 x 1200 in most games.

A single GTX560ti or 6950 will give you excellent performance at 1920 x 1200 in most games.
Even 2560 x 1600 will be good with lowered detail.
A single 7970 or GTX680 is about as good as it gets.

Only if you are looking at triple monitor gaming, then sli/cf will be needed.
Even that is now changing with triple monitor support on top end cards.

b) The costs for a single card are lower.
You require a less expensive motherboard; no need for sli/cf or multiple pci-e slots.
Even a ITX motherboard will do.

Your psu costs are less.
A GTX560ti needs a 450w psu, even a GTX580 only needs a 600w psu.
When you add another card to the mix, plan on adding 150-200w to your psu requirements.
A single more modern 28nm card like a 7970 or GTX680 needs only 550W.
Even the strongest GTX690 only needs 650w.

Case cooling becomes more of an issue with dual cards.
That means a more expensive case with more and stronger fans.
You will also look at more noise.

c) Dual cards do not always render their half of the display in sync, causing microstuttering. It is an annoying effect.
The benefit of higher benchmark fps can be offset, particularly with lower tier cards.
Read this: http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/radeon-geforce-stut...

d) dual card support is dependent on the driver. Not all games can benefit from dual cards.

e) cf/sli up front reduces your option to get another card for an upgrade. Not that I suggest you plan for that.
It will often be the case that replacing your current card with a newer gen card will offer a better upgrade path.

I would add an aftermarket cooler like the cm hyper212. It will keep your parts cooler and quieter.

Lastly, why not consider a 120gb or 180gb SSD instead? A samsung 830 120gb drive is about the same price as the 1tb WD black(good hard drive) It will hold the os and a handful of games. If you need to store large files, like video files, then add a hard drive later.
a c 278 4 Gaming
July 20, 2012 4:36:49 PM

Quote:
The critical component for gamers is the graphics card, more so than the cpu.


While I agree with this 150% I will say that it makes no sense to get the i5-2500 with a Z77 board. It also makes no sense when you're paying that kind of money not to get an unlocked CPU. If you're going with a Z77 board, go with the i5-3570K.
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July 20, 2012 4:44:48 PM

Thanks a lot for the reply, you've given me a lot to maul over. I could probably go £30 to £40 pound cheaper on a mobo without SLI. Same goes with the PSU. When it comes to HDD space I would fill up 180g so fast so it's really not an option to go SSD just yet. I was hoping to future proof it with the option of another GPU at some point. Also would the 2550K give me that much more performance as it's more expensive?
a c 278 4 Gaming
July 20, 2012 4:56:37 PM

Doctor_Den said:
Thanks a lot for the reply, you've given me a lot to maul over. I could probably go £30 to £40 pound cheaper on a mobo without SLI. Same goes with the PSU. When it comes to HDD space I would fill up 180g so fast so it's really not an option to go SSD just yet. I was hoping to future proof it with the option of another GPU at some point. Also would the 2550K give me that much more performance as it's more expensive?


I wouldn't bother with the 2550K because you forfeit onboard video - and if there's ever a problem with your GPU then you can't use that diagnostic tool. Go with the 3570K or the i5-3450. And then put a bit more into your GPU and get a Radeon 7850 - you'll get more out of your system that way.
a b 4 Gaming
July 20, 2012 5:10:52 PM

The newer 28nm based graphics cards need less power.
The 7870 and GTX670, for example need only a 500w psu.
Even the GTX690 needs only 650w.

I think I would stick with a 650w psu. It will only use the wattage that is demanded of it. Under normal usage, it will be quieter when operating in the middle third of it's range.

I was using the 2550K as an example of budget, not recommending that particular chip.
Regarding the cpu, the 3570K is as good as it gets for gaming. I highly recommend it.
To my mind, the extra #20 is well worth it over the original 2500.

The starting clock rate of the 3570K is 3.4 vs. 3.3, and the 3570K is perhaps 5% faster on a clock for clock basis. The real benefit comes from raising the multiplier which boosts the rate from 3.4 to the 4.3 area.

I still would use a 120gb ssd for the os and a few apps or games. It will make everything you do feel so much quicker.

Add a larger hard drive for storage of non performance sensitive data.
a b 4 Gaming
July 20, 2012 5:25:22 PM

Doctor_Den said:
What about this coupled with the 3570K. Or would 650w really be ideal?
http://www.novatech.co.uk/products/components/powersupp...

When it comes to graphics I would much rather stay with Nvidia so maybe just upgrade to GTX670 at some point, but I would guess I need at least a 650w for that.


I like the 3570K for a cpu.

Corsair cx600 is a fine psu.
It is strong enough for even a GTX670.

If your time frame is suitable, you might look for the 28nm GTX660 in mid August:
http://www.techspot.com/news/49451-nvidia-geforce-gtx-6...
July 20, 2012 5:31:30 PM

It would be ideal if I could upgrade to a GTX 670 in the future using that PSU. August!? Ouch I don't think I could wait that long, but cheers for the heads up. I have configured my setup with the 3570K and the Corsair cx600 for only £2 more , thanks for the help.
a b 4 Gaming
July 20, 2012 5:49:35 PM

You are good.

The Corsair 600w psu can deliver 40a, and has 2 6 pin pcie power connectors.
That easily fits the suggested psu requirements for a EVGA GTX670 FTW:
http://www.evga.com/products/moreInfo.asp?pn=02G-P4-267... 600 Series Family&sw=

As an option, you could build using the integrated graphics initially, intending to buy the discrete card of your choice later.
July 20, 2012 6:02:10 PM

I hadn't thought of that (using the onboard graphics) again thanks for the help.
a c 278 4 Gaming
July 20, 2012 9:28:13 PM

Doctor_Den said:
What about this coupled with the 3570K. Or would 650w really be ideal?
http://www.novatech.co.uk/products/components/powersupp...

When it comes to graphics I would much rather stay with Nvidia so maybe just upgrade to GTX670 at some point, but I would guess I need at least a 650w for that.


Yeah that's a fine choice for PSU. You don't need anything more than that if you're not going to overclock or SLI/Crossfire.
!