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GPU Temperature 110C. Will extra fans in CPU help ?

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May 27, 2012 11:38:37 AM

My GPU is getting extremely heated up ( 90-100C without games, 110 while runnig games ). Will it help in bringing the temperature down if I install 1 or 2 extra fans in my cabinet ?

Or will the fans only provide good air supply but wont change the temperature much ?
a b Î Nvidia
May 27, 2012 12:02:56 PM

110C is hotter than any GPUs max temp should be. Seems like the GPU is not being properly cooled.

Make sure the fan is working properly and nothing is obstructing its movement and spray any dust from the fan/card. I doubt this would help much, but check.

If the card is under warranty, I'd start the RMA process. If it's not, you should start worrying about how this much heat will affect the rest of your system and start looking for a replacement.
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May 27, 2012 12:03:40 PM

Case fans will help provide the cool air to cool the heat sinks. But if the heat sink contacts to the GPU chip is poor then heat will not be transferred effectively from chip to heatsink & temperature will be very high.

What brand & model & how old is your GPU?
& when did the high GPU temperature started?
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May 27, 2012 12:05:30 PM

90-110c without games? Like, just sitting on the desktop?
You have a bigger problem than you think...
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May 27, 2012 12:24:32 PM

also, what type card are you running and with what psu? a mismatch between the 2 can also make your card run hot
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May 27, 2012 12:50:52 PM

My card is just 1 year old. It is 9500GT 1024 MB. And I dont know what PSU mean :p 

I am having this problem since about 3-4 months. Earlier I used to play lighter games.
But when I started playing Team Fortress 2 and Skyrim, afterplaying for a while ( say about 10 mins) the FPS drops to extremely low levels. I checked the temperature of my GPU and it was extremely high. My core temperature was fine.

The card has a heatsink and a small working fan. There is a bigger fan on the mother board and one inside the box where the power cord is attached.

People told me that I should apply thermal paste. Silicon heat sink compund is the only thermal paste I could find in the market. I applied it on the heatsink of the GPU and not between the heat sink and chip as I thought it might short my GPU.
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a b Î Nvidia
May 27, 2012 1:05:00 PM

You need to apply it between GPU and the heatsink. What you did is useless.
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May 27, 2012 1:08:29 PM

Wont it hurt my GPU chip. Silicon is a conductor!
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a b Î Nvidia
May 27, 2012 1:20:16 PM

Your heatsink is conductive as well.
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May 27, 2012 1:29:29 PM

tushar_18121994 said:
Wont it hurt my GPU chip. Silicon is a conductor!

Not if you apply it correctly. Actually when you bought the card, it already have a pre-applied thermal paste between the chips & the heatsink but this are just mediocre quality. If you get lucky, it will last the lifetime of the card without need to re-apply but it seems that you are not among the lucky ones.

You can watch youtube video's how to do it. They are not difficult & usually can be done in 20-30minutes. This small effort will spell a big difference.

But of course, the 9500 can only do so much. You might want to consider getting a GPU upgrade if you truly want to enjoy Skyrim.
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May 27, 2012 1:52:21 PM

psu means power supply unit. Back in the day, i added a 9600GT to my Dell computer. Unfortunately for me at the time, i did not know my power supply was not strong enough to supply the power for the video card under demanding conditions. Like you, when playing a graphics (GPU) intensive game, my frame rates would drop to practically nothing and then my screen would go black. My video card was getting excessively hot due to it running undercurrent since my psu was not strong enough for it. Depending on what type of computer your video card is installed in and the computers age, you may need to look into acquiring/building a new system if you want to play todays games
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a b Î Nvidia
May 27, 2012 2:02:30 PM

Under load, a graphics card will draw extra power and get hotter.
But 110c is way too hot.

You need to find out the cause.

First, buy some canned air, and blow it into the graphics card and everything else where dust may have accumulated.
That is the first most likely and simplest explanation.

You have already verified that the fan on the graphics card is actually spinning. If it wasn't, that would explain everything.

It is possible that your case has poor ventilation. If the ventilation is poor, the graphics card will not get sufficient cooling air.
To test this, take the side panel off the case, and direct a house fan at the insides. If that fixes your problem, then you have a case cooling issue.
Exactly what case do you have?

PSU is an acronym for Power Supply Unit.
If the psu does not have sufficient power, I would expect other issues, not heat issues. Do you know what PSU you have?
On the PSU label(any UL rated PSU must have one) you will wee the wattage rating, and more importantly, the amp rating on the +12v rails. What do you see there?
Also, the fan on the PSU is responsible only for cooling the PSU, not to help cool the case.

On rare occasions, the fan on the graphics card may not have been installed well.
Thermal grease goes between the fan and the graphics chip. It's purpose is to eliminate small air pockets which are poor heat conductors. If the card was working well before, it is unlikely that the graphics card cooler needs to be remounted.
Since you seem to not be experienced, I do not recommend remounting the graphics card cooler yourself. At least not until you know that is the problem.

If the graphics card gets dangerously hot, and you are close to that point, it will downclock itself to protect itself.
You will then notice a reduction in performance.

The recommended requirements for skyrim is a GTX260 or 4890 class grapnics card.
http://www.uesp.net/wiki/Skyrim:System_Requirements

Your 9500GT is several tiers below that. It meets minimum requirements, but you may want to consider selling it in favor of a stronger card.

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May 27, 2012 5:06:31 PM

I think we already discovered his problem... There is no thermal paste in between his gpu and heatsink....
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May 27, 2012 5:20:48 PM

Get yourself a good case for air cooling like the NZXT Switch 810 or Coolermaster HAF series. A GPU at over 90c is a bad idea. Make sure your videocard fan is not on auto which isn't a good idea too. Make sure the fan is at least on 75-100%. Also make sure you have good airflow in your case so you don't have to worry about temps.

I have a 560 TI 448 and the only time it was upwards of those temps was when my GPU fan was on auto.
Any of the Silverstone Raven cases will work as well.

Also look into getting one of these, I had one for my overheated HD 6950 and the temps never reached 55c even with overclocking.
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
https://dl.dropbox.com/u/25984104/HPIM1760.JPG
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a c 431 Î Nvidia
May 27, 2012 5:53:35 PM

Max1s said:
I think we already discovered his problem... There is no thermal paste in between his gpu and heatsink....

...And it sounds like its been plastered all over the heatsink.
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a b Î Nvidia
May 27, 2012 6:20:24 PM

17seconds said:
...And it sounds like its been plastered all over the heatsink.


That is what it sounds like to me too.

If the OP did not remove the cooler, the original paste isstill there, and is not likely to be the source of the problem.
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May 27, 2012 6:53:21 PM

I would quickly identify the problem though as 110C will destroy that card and maybe even over heat the rest of the computer.
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May 27, 2012 7:10:03 PM

9500gt is more than a year old, buy a new card.
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May 28, 2012 6:18:31 AM

Well, I bought the computer just an year ago so I am not gonna get money for buying a new graphic card!

After shutting down my PC, when I touch the heatsink of the GPU, it is pretty hot so I think I should install a fan to cool it up. Also, there are no screws on the heatsink so I dont think I can remove it and apply thermal paste between it and the card. I'll try doing it using a paintbrush. Just tell me whether it is safe to apply "Silicon Thermal Paste" ? Wont it short my GPU.

Also I'll post the info about my PSU.

If I am installing a fan to cool down the GPU, which one should it be, one that blows air inside or the one that blows air outside ?

Thank you all for your replies. :) 

Also in a few hours I'll upload the picture of my GPU and the cabinet so you can see things by yourself.

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May 28, 2012 8:53:48 AM

tushar_18121994 said:
Also, there are no screws on the heatsink so I dont think I can remove it and apply thermal paste between it and the card. I'll try doing it using a paintbrush.

The screws are usually found at the back of the printed circuit board ( the other side of the card ).

tushar_18121994 said:
Just tell me whether it is safe to apply "Silicon Thermal Paste" ? Wont it short my GPU.

It is safe to apply but only between the heatsink plate & the GPU chips. You need to apply it properly & like I said you can watch youtube videos of it.

tushar_18121994 said:
If I am installing a fan to cool down the GPU, which one should it be, one that blows air inside or the one that blows air outside ?

A side case fan will be most helpful to cool the GPU. If your case allow, you should install it blowing air inside.

tushar_18121994 said:
Also in a few hours I'll upload the picture of my GPU and the cabinet so you can see things by yourself.

Great. :) 
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May 28, 2012 10:57:13 AM

This is a video showing how to CORRECTLY apply thermal paste.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XX-8cC3PNg4

The metal on top of the gpu is not the actual chip, it is a metal heatspreader, it protects the actual chip and helps disperse heat. Putting heat paste on it wont short it. Heat paste helps conduct the heat from the chip to the heatsink.
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a b Î Nvidia
May 28, 2012 1:15:57 PM

tushar_18121994 said:
Wont it hurt my GPU chip. Silicon is a conductor!

You want to conduct heat from the chip to the heatsink. That's the point. I still don't think this is going to do the trick.
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May 28, 2012 3:14:34 PM

Max1s said:
This is a video showing how to CORRECTLY apply thermal paste.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XX-8cC3PNg4

The metal on top of the gpu is not the actual chip, it is a metal heatspreader, it protects the actual chip and helps disperse heat. Putting heat paste on it wont short it. Heat paste helps conduct the heat from the chip to the heatsink.


My graphic card looks nothing like the one in this video.
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May 28, 2012 11:08:14 PM

It may not look exactly like it but the general principle should be the same. If you are not comfortable with disassembling the GPU, then hold of for a while & try to see what becomes of the operating temperature if you use the PC with the case open?

We are still waiting for the picture, by the way. :) 
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May 29, 2012 11:46:30 AM

My GPU's heatsink is not removable. It has some wierd plastic screws which are not removable.

And I will upload the pics as soon as I get time. Last time when I sat down to take the pictures, my cam wasnt charged :p 

For the time being I have removed the GPU and I am using the motherboard's inbuilt graphics. To my amazement, my motherboard has a nice inbuilt graphic card with about 732 MB memory and it runs Team Fortress 2 pretty fine and is even able to run Skyrim, not well though.

And I have tried keeping my case open while playing games but no use.
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May 29, 2012 12:18:16 PM

Here are the images:

http://imgur.com/a/5sYgn#0

#1: My GPU. You can see the plastic non removable screw-like things.
#2: Closer view of heatsinks and plastic screws.
#3: The back side of GPU nad the plastic screws.
#4: Inside of the cabinet without GPU. There is a fan on the motherboard and one inside the power supply box.
#5: Same thing from another angle.
#6: That is where the GPU goes with the heatsink on the bottom side.
#7: Cabinet from yet another angle :p 
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a b Î Nvidia
May 29, 2012 12:24:22 PM

Ouch! That's a lot of cables! Consider tidying them!

Secondly, those 'screws' are removable. You need to squeeze those white thingies on the #3 photo.
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a b Î Nvidia
May 29, 2012 12:29:04 PM

You'll probably have to gently pinch those plastic push-pin type fasteners with pliers to get them back through the card.

They don't count on people doing a lot of maintenance on this type of card. That's why they don't use screws.

You can attempt to do this or the 9500GT runs around $50 refurbed on newegg:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
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May 29, 2012 12:38:01 PM

Well I was able to remove the heatsink, not gently though. Dont know whether it will go back in or not. I'll do it after applying paste.
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a b Î Nvidia
May 29, 2012 12:39:25 PM

Make sure you clean both the surface of the chip and the heatsink before applying the new thermal compound.
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May 29, 2012 12:40:12 PM

Also, what do you think, do I need case fans inside this cabinet to cool my GPU up ?
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a b Î Nvidia
May 29, 2012 12:43:45 PM

Seriously, if this thermal paste doesn't work with that video card (max rated temp at 105C), I'd remove it from the system and consider a new card.

The heat from a faulty card will begin to damage the rest of your system otherwise.
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May 29, 2012 1:16:15 PM

tushar_18121994 said:
Also, what do you think, do I need case fans inside this cabinet to cool my GPU up ?

I cannot see a slot for the FAN at the back. It looks like you have a slim case. Is there any place to mount a FAN in the front or in the side case cover?
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May 29, 2012 1:26:28 PM

I applied the paste and after that the PC took some time to heat up while playing Skyrim. I think now a fan will do everything for me.
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a b Î Nvidia
May 29, 2012 1:38:20 PM

How hot does the card get?
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a b Î Nvidia
May 29, 2012 1:39:03 PM

I think you have a case cooling problem.

Leave the side panel off, and direct a house fan at the insides.
If that solves your problem, then you need to improve the airflow within the case.

Do not count on the PSU fan to supply any airflow. It's sole job is to keep the psu cool.

1) Remove the expansion slot covers from the back of the case. That will allow air to more easily exit the case.

2) I can't see, but usually, you will have a place to mount an intake fan or two.
Usually, the space will take a 92mm fan, or, better yet, a 120mm fan. They are relatively cheap.
The stronger(higher rpm) the fan is, the better your airflow. But, at the expense of noise.

Install what you can so that it draws in cool air from the front of the case. Fans are usually marked with the direction of airflow. Verify that you have the proper direction by dangling a piece of tissue in front of the case. See that it is being sucked in.

3) You want as clear a path as possible for air to flow across the graphics card, and out the back.
Shift any cables you can to one side or the other.
It looks llike the hard drive is in the airflow path. See if you can't move it up higher, or down lower to clear the air path.
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May 30, 2012 7:20:59 AM

Well the temperature is still high. Heat sink is getting pretty hot. So I will install the fans.

Without games it is 80-85 C.
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May 30, 2012 9:24:57 AM

tushar_18121994 said:
Well the temperature is still high. Heat sink is getting pretty hot. So I will install the fans.

Without games it is 80-85 C.

That is still hot for idle. Is that with case open or closed?
What's the temperature when playing games?
Do you have any FAN slot in the cover where you can install a FAN?
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