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New rig checking

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July 21, 2012 1:47:56 AM

hey guys Im checking to see if everything that I am about to buy is going to work out. thanks your time / advice.
I am building this computer
#1 as an investment that will last me a long time
#2 for gaming

I have a few question if you guys don't mind
-I don't really know what to do with my hard drive....should I get a ssd for windows/apps and a second hard drive (2tb) for files? Or should I just get 1 hard drive?
something like this SAMSUNG 830 Series
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
-also will all these parts work/fit with each other?
-thanks again



psu -
Intel Core i7-3770K Ivy Bridge 3.5GHz (3.9GHz Turbo) LGA 1155 77W Quad-Core Desktop Processor Intel HD Graphics 4000 BX80637I73770K
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

MB-
ASUS Sabertooth X79 LGA 2011 Intel X79 SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX Intel Motherboard
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

RAM-
CORSAIR Vengeance 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Desktop Memory Model CML8GX3M2A1600C9W
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

VCARD-
GIGABYTE GV-N670OC-2GD GeForce GTX 670 2GB 256-bit GDDR5 PCI Express 3.0 x16 HDCP Ready SLI Support Video Card
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Power Supply-
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

COOLER-
CORSAIR H100 (CWCH100) Extreme Performance Liquid CPU Cooler
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

CASE-
Corsair Vengeance Series C70 Arctic White Steel ATX Mid Tower Computer Case
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

More about : rig checking

a b B Homebuilt system
July 21, 2012 2:40:56 AM

Lol, alright. Let us begin...

The processor you selected isn't compatible with the mobo. The CPU is based on the LGA 1155 socket whereas you selected a LGA 2011 socket based motherboard. From the looks of this build, I'd say you have around $1500 or more that you're willing to put in this build.

If this is primarily for gaming, I'd recommend you drop the 3770k and go with the i5 3570k. That's around $100-150 you'll save. If you're not going to be taking advantage of the hyperthreading, there's absolutely no reason to grab the i7.

i5 3570k...
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

ASRock Z77 Extreme4 mobo...
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

I would not recommend that you get the H100 cpu cooler. Lots of people are having to RMA them. They're noisy and problematic. Just to be safe, grab an air cooler...take your pick...

Hyper 212 evo
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Noctua NH-D14
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

The noctua cools better and is a bit quieter. The hyper 212 is efficient but more cost effective.

Try this PSU...

PC Power and Cooling 750w
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
It's perfect for SLI and Crossfire. It's 80+ silver certified. Great PSU for the money. It also has tons of positive reviews.

RAM and GPU are great choices. The RAM will go well with the bulky heatsinks.

The case looks good as well. May I recommend a few others...

Corsair Special Edition White Graphite Series 600T
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Corsair Obsidian Series 650D
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Antec Eleven Hundred Black Super Mid Tower Computer Case
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

COOLER MASTER HAF 922
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

For storage, you should grab both a SSD and a HDD. Use the HDD for media storage and use the SSD for your OS and a few games...

[HDD] Western Digital Caviar Black
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

[SSD] Corsair 240gb SSD
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
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a c 118 B Homebuilt system
July 21, 2012 2:51:38 AM

Quote:
#1 as an investment that will last me a long time


Deus has made proper adjustments in regards to the compatibility of parts, however I will comment on this..

If you're expecting this computer to stay top of the line for say 10 years, you will be very disappointed. No matter how fancy the parts you buy today, they will all be slow crap in 4-5 years.

You will find in the long run it is wisest to spend less money on a build that will do what you need it to today, rather than trying to bulk up the system, buying more power than you need in the name of "future proofing". The best option is buy what will get the job done for you today, and in 3-4 years, save your case, power supply, optical drive, and maybe hard drive and do a rebuild of the mobo, cpu, video card, and ram.

As such, my advice is to go ahead and get yourself a nice case. All of the cases Dues mentioned, and the one you're looking at are good quality. Corsair makes very good cases, I might also recommend you check out some of the offerings from NZXT, they are also a very good case manufacturer.

On the subject of watercooling. I would not do it unless you know what you're getting yourself into. Watercooling is dangerous, plain and simple. When they say watercooled, they aren't kidding, you are putting a radiator with hoses next to your expensive computer parts that is filled with distilled water. (Water and electronics don't mix)

There is always a risk of a hose bursting or water from condensation. Now, its rare for accidents to happen, however they indeed can. Simply put, with modern CPUs watercooling is less necessary for overclocking, and no less dangerous. The Nocuta D14 is the best air cooled unit money can buy. That thing is a behemoth and it can hold its own with a high end watercooler any day.
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a b B Homebuilt system
July 21, 2012 3:09:26 AM

I'd go with the ssd and the hdd. The ssd that you are looking is good but a 120gb ssd should be good with a 2tb hhd. This ssd looks good http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... and this hdd http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... The motherboard you picked is a lga 2011 you need a lga 1155 for the i7 3770k. If you want to go with asus sabertooth lga 1155 http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... or if you want to stay in the same price range http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
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July 21, 2012 3:25:26 AM

thanks guys for the advice -_-! going over everything as we speak
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a b B Homebuilt system
July 21, 2012 3:33:03 AM

nekulturny said:

If you're expecting this computer to stay top of the line for say 10 years, you will be very disappointed. No matter how fancy the parts you buy today, they will all be slow crap in 4-5 years.

You will find in the long run it is wisest to spend less money on a build that will do what you need it to today, rather than trying to bulk up the system, buying more power than you need in the name of "future proofing". The best option is buy what will get the job done for you today, and in 3-4 years, save your case, power supply, optical drive, and maybe hard drive and do a rebuild of the mobo, cpu, video card, and ram.

As such, my advice is to go ahead and get yourself a nice case. All of the cases Dues mentioned, and the one you're looking at are good quality. Corsair makes very good cases, I might also recommend you check out some of the offerings from NZXT, they are also a very good case manufacturer.


^+1.

A $750 machine built today > a $1500 machine built three years ago. A $750 machine built three years from now will likewise outpace a $1500 machine built today.

[edit] hell, you could probably drop the interval to two years and it'd still be true.

It pays to invest in a nice case because that's a part you'll likely be able to re-use in the next build. Ditto the power supply (also good to invest in that for many other reasons). Monitor, mouse & speakers/headphones are also good long term investments.

I'd add keyboard to the list for people who aren't spill-prone like me :)  I buy $20 keyboards because I destroy them, even a couple "spill-proof" keyboards. Turns out they're not immune to hot coffee.

have fun!
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a b B Homebuilt system
July 21, 2012 3:50:58 AM

nekulturny said:
Quote:
#1 as an investment that will last me a long time


Deus has made proper adjustments in regards to the compatibility of parts, however I will comment on this..

If you're expecting this computer to stay top of the line for say 10 years, you will be very disappointed. No matter how fancy the parts you buy today, they will all be slow crap in 4-5 years.

You will find in the long run it is wisest to spend less money on a build that will do what you need it to today, rather than trying to bulk up the system, buying more power than you need in the name of "future proofing". The best option is buy what will get the job done for you today, and in 3-4 years, save your case, power supply, optical drive, and maybe hard drive and do a rebuild of the mobo, cpu, video card, and ram.

As such, my advice is to go ahead and get yourself a nice case. All of the cases Dues mentioned, and the one you're looking at are good quality. Corsair makes very good cases, I might also recommend you check out some of the offerings from NZXT, they are also a very good case manufacturer.

On the subject of watercooling. I would not do it unless you know what you're getting yourself into. Watercooling is dangerous, plain and simple. When they say watercooled, they aren't kidding, you are putting a radiator with hoses next to your expensive computer parts that is filled with distilled water. (Water and electronics don't mix)

There is always a risk of a hose bursting or water from condensation. Now, its rare for accidents to happen, however they indeed can. Simply put, with modern CPUs watercooling is less necessary for overclocking, and no less dangerous. The Nocuta D14 is the best air cooled unit money can buy. That thing is a behemoth and it can hold its own with a high end watercooler any day.


+2^
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July 21, 2012 4:16:05 AM

this website + you guys = thank you (DeusAres/quilciri/strife_ff7)


going to post a new build for review

i5 3570k
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

ASRock Z77 Extreme4 mobo
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

cooler
Noctua NH-D14
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

psu
Silencer Mk II 750W
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

RAM
CORSAIR Vengeance 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Desktop Memory Model CML8GX3M2A1600C9W
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

VCARD
GIGABYTE GV-N670OC-2GD GeForce GTX 670 2GB 256-bit GDDR5 PCI Express 3.0 x16 HDCP Ready SLI Support Video Card
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

storage
[HDD] Western Digital Caviar Black 2TB (strife_ff7 2tb over 1tb?)
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

[SSD] Corsair 240gb SSD
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

as far as the case ... Inno guys they all seem really good..out of all of them what one would be best for this build?





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a b B Homebuilt system
July 21, 2012 7:20:10 AM

Well, there's a bit of a gap in cases, imo. There's a lot of good cases in the $50-60 range, but above that you don't see much improvement in case quality until the price doubles.

my fav. $50-60 cases, in no particular order
Zalman Z9 plus (not the regular Z9)
Rosewill Challenger
Azza Toldeo 301

Though they're not my personal picks, the Antec 300 is a standby, and the Coolermaster HAF 912 is quickly becoming one.

In the $120-150 bracket, I like
Lian-Li Lancool
Corsair Carbide
Rosewill Thor
Coolermaster HAF 932

and you couldn't go wrong with the antec 1200, either.
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a b B Homebuilt system
July 21, 2012 8:03:06 AM

FULL TOWER CASE RECOMMENDATIONS IN NO CERTAIN ORDER

Case:Rosewill THOR V2 Gaming ATX Full Tower Computer Case, support up to E-ATX / XL-ATX, come with Four Fans - 1 x Front Red LED 230mm Fan, 1 x Top 230mm Fan, 1 x Side 230mm Fan, 1 x Rear 140mm Fan
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Case:Antec Twelve Hundred V3 Black Steel ATX Full Tower Unbeatable Gaming Case
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Case:Thermaltake Chaser MK-I (VN300M1W2N) Black SECC ATX Full Tower Computer Case
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Case:COOLER MASTER HAF 932 Advanced RC-932-KKN5-GP Black Steel ATX Full Tower Computer Case with USB 3.0, Black Interior and Four Fans-1x 230mm front RED LED fan, 1x 140mm rear fan, 1x 230mm top fan, and 1x 230mm side fan
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Case:COOLER MASTER CM Storm Series Trooper (SGC-5000-KKN1) Black Steel / Plastic ATX Full Tower Computer Case
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Case:NZXT SWITCH 810 Matte Black CA-SW810-M1 Steel / Plastic ATX HYBIRD Full Tower Gaming Computer Case
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Case:NZXT Phantom PHAN-001BK Black Steel / Plastic Enthusiast ATX Full Tower Computer Case
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Case:COOLER MASTER HAF X RC-942-KKN1 Black Steel/ Plastic ATX Full Tower Computer Case
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Case:Antec DF-85 Black Steel / Plastic ATX Full Tower Computer Case
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
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a b B Homebuilt system
July 21, 2012 8:03:17 AM

MID TOWER CASE RECOMMENDATIONS IN NO CERTAIN ORDER Case:COOLER MASTER HAF XM RC-922XM-KKN1 Black Mesh, Plastic, Steel ATX Mid Tower Computer Case
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
Case:Corsair Carbide Series 400R Graphite grey and black Steel / Plastic ATX Mid Tower Gaming Case
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Case:Antec Nine Hundred Black Steel ATX Mid Tower Computer Case with Upgraded USB 3.0
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Case:COOLER MASTER RC-692-KKN2 CM690 II Black Steel ATX Mid Tower Computer Case
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...


Case:NZXT Apollo Black SECC Steel Chassis ATX Mid Tower Computer Case
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Case:Antec Eleven Hundred Black Super Mid Tower Computer Case
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Case:COOLER MASTER HAF 922 RC-922M-KKN3-GP Black Steel + Plastic and Mesh Bezel ATX Mid Tower Computer Case with USB 3.0 and Black Interior
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

COOLER MASTER HAF 912 RC-912-KKN1 Black SECC/ ABS Plastic ATX Mid Tower Computer Case
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
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a b B Homebuilt system
July 21, 2012 8:13:04 AM

As was said above original build had mismatched MoBo / CPU. Given ya apparent budget, I don't see the need tpo drop down to Asrock MoBo. This Combo gives you the same superb Sabertooth quality and 5 year warranty for just $453 for MoBo and CPU (3670k)

http://www.newegg.com/Product/ComboDealDetails.aspx?Ite...

The Noc cooler has good thermal performance but it just doesn't stand up to the Phanteks. The latter exceeds the Noc's thermal performance but is a helluva lot more pleasing aesthetically and has a 5 year warranty to the Noc's 1 year.
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
http://www.vortez.net/articles_pages/phanteks_ph_tc14pe...

Don't forget TIM.....for the best thermal performance w/o AS%'s curing issues, Shin Etsu tops the charts
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
http://benchmarkreviews.com/index.php?option=com_conten...

If overclocking the CPU and PSU, I'd use an 850 watt PSU. nVidia calls for a minimum system power of 670 watts
http://www.geforce.com/hardware/desktop-gpus/geforce-gt...

Maintaining stable voltages with two overclocked GPU's and one overclocked CPU warrants a bit of headroom. OCP&C is now OCZ and no PSU outta their doors has impressed me yet. The HX850 is a 10.0 performance rated PSU (jonnyguru) which ahs better ripple numbers and better voltage stability then the newer AX series. At $140 it's a great buy ..... $15 off w/ promo code "CorsairJulA" and a $20 MIR
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

At the 9.5 performance rating, there's the XFX Core Edition and the Corsair TX V2
$95 http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
$124 http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

The Gigabyte 670 is a very good one, but it's not the one that got the only 10.0 rating ever from tehcpowerup:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
http://www.techpowerup.com/reviews/ASUS/GeForce_GTX_670...

RAM is solid choice

The Corsair Force 3 is an entry level SSD

http://www.tweaktown.com/reviews/4328/mushkin_chronos_d...

Quote:
Other than a few really oddball entries, SF-2281 'consumer' SSDs come in three flash flavors. Starting on the low end, you have IMFT 25nm asynchronous flash, a budget flash used in the Agility 3, Force 3, Chronos (non-Deluxe model) and a few other drives that in our testing perform at around the same level as last year's SF-1200 controlled drives when filled to 50 percent capacity. A majority of drives use IMFT 25nm synchronous flash; Vertex 3, Force GT, S511 and so on.

Synchronous flash, also called ONFi 2.x is really the first step for enthusiasts, especially now that prices have really dropped. The final flash type used is 3Xnm Toggle Mode flash from Toshiba, a form of ONFi 2.x without the JEDEC classification. 25nm IMFT is rated for around 5K P/E cycles and 3Xnm Toshiba Toggle Mode flash is rated for around twice as many. Even though we are talking about writing a lot of data for a very long time, the 3Xnm flash will still last even longer.


In other words, toshiba toggle mode flash is "the bomb", fastest, longest lasting available. And it's available on the Patriot Wildfire, OWC Mercury Extreme Pro 6G (latest revision), OCZ Vertex 3 Max IOPS and Mushkin Chronos Deluxe. Only Mushkin sells the 240GB model for under $200. Why pay $210 for tier 3 when ya can get Tier 1 for $200.

http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/ssd-benchmark-revie...

Quote:
In order to simplify the landscape, we're going to omit brand names for those vendors leveraging SandForce. There are simply too many to list. At a given capacity, performance breaks down based on memory type, and this is their order of performance, from highest to lowest.

1. SandForce controller with Toggle DDR NAND (Mushkin Chronos Deluxe, Patriot Wildfire, OCZ Vertex 3 Max IOPS, Kingston HyperX 3K, OWC Mercury Extreme Pro 6G)
2. SandForce controller with Synchronous ONFi NAND (OCZ Vertex 3, Corsair Force GT, Kingston HyperX, Intel SSD 520)
3. SandForce controller with Asynchronous ONFi NAND (OCZ Agility 3, Corsair Force 3, Mushkin Chronos, Patriot Pyro, OWC Mercury Electra 6G)

Tier 1
240 GB second-gen SandForce SSDs with Toggle NAND [i.e. 240 GB Chronos Deluce]
Samsung 830 SSD 256 GB
Plextor M3 Pro 128 GB/256 GB


So these are the Tier 1 choices .... $50 price difference should make the choice easy

$200 Chronos Deluxe http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
$250 Samsung 830 http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
$250 Plextor M3 http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

As for case, depends on ya budget

$250 - $300 - Here there's only one case that gives ya enough features to warrant the price and that's the Thermaltake Level 10 GT. I'd pay $100 for the removable door feature (no fan cables to disconnect) alone. It gets 9.55 BMR rating
http://benchmarkreviews.com/index.php?option=com_conten...
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

$140 - $200 - Here I like the Antec DF-85 and 1200 V3. The HAF-X fits in here but falls a notch or two compared to those two since the Antecs get a huge boost for their ability to take CPX form factor PSU's. You won't find a quieter PSU with a 10.0 jonnyguru performance rating than the CP-850 .... and certainly not for $120
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

$120 - $140 - here the Corsair 500R just shines above anything else in this category including it little brother the 400R which is compared with the 500R in the 1st link
http://www.tweaktown.com/reviews/4408/corsair_carbide_s...
http://benchmarkreviews.com/index.php?option=com_conten...
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Productcompare.aspx?Submi...|11-139-009^11-139-009-TS%2C11-139-010^11-139-010-TS

$100 - Here I like the Antec 900 which has $10 promo code at the moment
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
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a b B Homebuilt system
July 21, 2012 4:19:07 PM

Quote:
as far as the case ... Inno guys they all seem really good..out of all of them what one would be best for this build


This is a personal choice. Remember this is one of those things that you're gonna have to look at everyday, talk to, and in some ways...caress and make love to. :D 

Look for a mid to full tower case. I'd typically go with a case that has high airflow, big and roomy, and is aesthetically pleasing. The case you originally chose (corsair C70) is a beautiful case. It has all the features I'd look for in a case. Do you like that case? Or are there other cases you like?

At this point, I'd go through some of the recommendations given and look at each of those cases. Find the ones you like the most, then begin to compare and contrast important features such as airflow and cable management. Usually, cases with rubber grommets on the inside are the best for cable management. Cases with numerous fan mounts typically have the best airflow.

Here's a couple of examples of those cases that have those features. So as to not overwhelm you with so many choices, I only listed two examples for now.
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

I hope you find this helpful. :) 
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a b B Homebuilt system
July 21, 2012 4:25:58 PM

Quote:
Given ya apparent budget, I don't see the need tpo drop down to Asrock MoBo.


There's absolutely no reason to spend extra money on features he's not going to need or even use. The Sabertooth mobos are extremely overrated and overpriced. I can get the same performance out of that $130 ASRock Extreme4 and look good doing it.
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a c 118 B Homebuilt system
July 21, 2012 4:31:40 PM

There is one reason to consider a Sabertooth board. Yes, I agree you can get the same features much cheaper, but the Sabertooths do have a 5 year warranty. You won't get that with a $130 Asrock board. Longer warranties tend to be an indication of better quality. Lets face it, they don't want to have to replace the board, as such, they're not going to offer a 5 year warranty on a turd.
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July 21, 2012 4:41:16 PM

Get a sabertooth z77. It will work with the i7-3770k you originally mentioned. I also recommend getting corsair ax series psu because they have 7 year warranties. Instead of a force series ssd get a force gt series ssd people seem to be having less problems with them overall.
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a b B Homebuilt system
July 21, 2012 4:47:15 PM

ASRock: 3 Year warranty
Sabertooth: 5 Year warranty

ASRock:$124.99
Sabertooth: $239.99

Is it worth the $100+ extra? Most parts typically fail from a factory defect within just a couple of days to a couple of months use. Unless you're very clumsy with your computer or very unlucky, I don't see the necessity in a 5 year warranty. As stated above, you may as well just get what's gonna get the job done now, then upgrade in the future. By then, we'll already have intel's upcoming tock and be moving into the next cycle. Perhaps I'm being a little too generous. 5 years is a long time for technology to evolve. No telling what kind of new and awesome things we'll be looking at. :D 
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a c 118 B Homebuilt system
July 21, 2012 4:54:28 PM

I suppose. It really does suck that Intel Sabertooths are so much more. The AMD Sabertooths are only $170. Much easier to justify the extra money in that situation.
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a b B Homebuilt system
July 21, 2012 5:57:33 PM

nekulturny said:
I suppose. It really does suck that Intel Sabertooths are so much more. The AMD Sabertooths are only $170. Much easier to justify the extra money in that situation.


Lol, indeed. Don't get me wrong, I like the sabertooth boards. They're pretty cool. But they're too expensive (for me at least). :(  Better off to put that extra money towards a better GPU, processor, or SSD.
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