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Is this guy for real?

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July 21, 2012 5:28:36 AM

Hello,
So I put in a bid for a PC to be built for myself utilizing some parts I already own (X-Force case, 8GB DDR3, 9800GT, hard drives, and two CD/DVD burners as well as windows 7 64) and after some talking thru email about what I need(mild gaming, mostly video editing and rendering with some Photoshop and some Avid Studio), he sends me this email. I will be buying his services for building and overclocking, and a motherboard he currently has, brand new supposedly - P8Z77V-LX. I had originally wanted a 3770K but he advised I go with the 2600K for more overclocking headroom, and I don't really care about PCIe 3.0. I will be adding SLI/Crossfire video cards in the future. Is this a good deal? What would you do different as far as parts? Are the prices fair? Does he know what he is talking about? Thanks. :love: 

-Name withheld-,
Here are the links to the items I recommend and the prices for each, including total. I have spent the last four hours researching to make sure you get the very best system possible while not making your wallet scream for mercy. I'm quite sure you will be very pleased with this system - I know I would. Make sure when you purchase from Microcenter to get the extended warranty, specifically for the processor. Microcenter covers overclocking with this warranty.

But first, a little insight. As you can see from this benchmark, the stock 3770k ($340)and stock 2600k ($220) are very very close in terms of performance, in my opinion the 3770K does not warrant the price premium while the 2600K can achieve higher overclocks with less heat. In most scenarios, the 3770K is only a few points higher than the 2600K, and only shaves a couple minutes off rendering large movies. What it really comes down to is this: Is 2-3 minutes of rendering time worth the extra $120? My knowledge and experience shouts a definitive 'NO'. http://www.anandtech.com/bench/Product/551?vs=287

Power supply (1000w): $169.99, $149.99 after mail-in-rebate.
http://www.microcenter.com/single_product_results.phtml... This is overkill right now for what you are putting in, but for Crossfire (dual video card) purposes in the future, you will definitely need it. For now, this one (750w) will do great if you need to save some cash. Alternate Power Supply: $99.99, $79.99 after mail-in-rebate.
http://www.microcenter.com/single_product_results.phtml...

Processor: $219.99 + Warranty: $20-25
http://www.microcenter.com/single_product_results.phtml...

CPU Cooler: $29.99, $19.99 after mail-in-rebate.
http://www.microcenter.com/single_product_results.phtml... I've seen tests of this cooler that keep a stock i7 2600K below 70c at full load WITHOUT a fan! It is truly incredible. 98c is the thermal limit of the 2600K. At 98c, the processor will "throttle" - basically slow itself down in order to cool off, or even shut the system off to save itself from burning up.

Motherboard: P8Z77V-LX: $130 retail, my price to you is $95 as advertised.

Build cost with operating system install: $100
Overclocking: $50

This brings the total to roughly $635 before taxes with the 1000w PSU. I know we had discussed your budget of $600 on the phone - I had forgotten to mention the cooler cost on the phone to you, sorry for that. Besides going to a lesser processor, there really isn't much to do about lowering the cost. If need be, we can get together and figure something out that will work for your budget. Normally I have customers purchase thermal paste for the processor, but I have enough here to do your build so don't worry about that. This saves you almost ten dollars. I'm not sure of your fan setup, but I would recommend some high-CFM LED-lit fans to showcase this powerhouse. According to the spec sheet, it holds three fans. One 80mm on the side, one 120mm in the rear, and one 120mm in the front. I recommend the following, which is not included in the total cost stated above:
Side fan (intake, 80mm) 2 options:
Fastest fan available, moves lots of air (84 CFM) but is kind of loud:
http://www.microcenter.com/single_product_results.phtml...
Quieter fan, doesn't move as much air (40 CFM max) but still acceptable:
http://www.microcenter.com/single_product_results.phtml...
Front fan (Intake, 120mm) and Rear fan (exhaust, 120mm) 3 options:
Red LED, 69 CFM rated, quiet:
http://www.microcenter.com/single_product_results.phtml...
Red LED, 82 CFM rated, slightly louder:
http://www.microcenter.com/single_product_results.phtml...
White LED, 74 CFM rated, slightly louder:
http://www.microcenter.com/single_product_results.phtml...
I chose to list red LED fans because I think it will look nice going with the red theme on the front of your case, judging from the pictures I have seen on the web. If it is different, or you just don't want LED fans, I have some other fans that are great for your build - just let me know. It is important to have high airflow through your case while overclocking to achieve the best results. Heat is the biggest killer of anything PC-related - keep it cool. From the reviews I have read on your case, the stock fans don't move much air at all (20-30 CFM at best).
The reason for two intake fans is for dust control. Two intakes and one exhaust will create positive air pressure inside the case, which will inhibit dust settling on your components and help to keep it from accumulating inside components such as DVD drives.

Just as a comparison, I am including Microcenter's pricing schedule. I am the cheapest around, but don't let that fool you. I guarantee my work just like everyone else, and I'm not some corporate worker slamming stuff together and hoping for the best; this is my passion, my hobby - I take pride in getting the best results.

Microcenter build prices:
Basic build, no operating system installed: $85
With Operating System: $140
Gaming (RAID, SSD, etc) $200
Gaming with water cooling: $250
Overclocking: $50, not guaranteed to work, could run hotter than needed, etc. (I've had them overclock other client's PCs with less-than-desirable results, to say the least)

Keep in mind that overclocking is a very time consuming job to do it right - please allow the PC to be with me for at least three days to ensure stability. The best case is to have the programs you will be using installed and able to run for a few hours to test for stability over about a week. Synthetic benchmarks are great, but most programs DO NOT utilize and stress components as much as a synthetic benchmark will. Example: Overclock to 4.5Ghz gives errors in synthetic benchmark, but runs fine in the toughest video rendering or gaming scenario without errors or crashes. The best benchmark is real world scenarios.

Feel free to make changes to suit your budget, but keep in mind that this setup should give you years of trouble-free service and is put together specifically to suit your needs as described in a previous email.

Wishing you a wonderful weekend,
-Name Withheld-

More about : guy real

July 21, 2012 5:46:44 AM

You don't need a 1000W PSU. Despite what he says a 750W unit will easily power dual cards and an overclock. He also advises OCZ units, they are a mid range PSU maker. Go for Corsair, Seasonic, XFX or Silvertsone supply's, make sure its modular and 80+ Bronze or better.

The CPU he linked to is the i7-2600, not the 2600K. You wont be able to overclock it without the "k". I can see his reasoning behind the 2600K instead if 3770K, though the overclock bit I think is nonsense. Ivy Bridge does get hotter when you overclock compared to Sandy, but clock for clock an Ivy will beat the Sandy Bridge, which means each clock is worth more. Cant hit as high speeds, but you don't need to.

The motherboard he is recommending is not suited for SLI/Crossfire. It will work yes, but performance might be degraded to lower than a single card. When two cards are inserted they will both run at 4x/4x, while any dual card setup should be at 8x/8x or 16x/16x (not really possible on the LGA1155 platform though). This board appears to be identical except its PCI-e slots will run at 8x/8x when dual cards are inserted.
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Get the Hyper 212 EVO, not the 212+. The EVO has a better baseplate which leads to much cooler idle temps and bit better load.

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July 21, 2012 5:48:56 AM

i stopped at the 1000 watt PSU. what a major overkill even with TRI SLI! (ok i am embellishing . a little)

also if i am not mistaken you are going for a i7-2600 which cannot be overclocked but yet you are being charged $50 to overclock it?

also for video rendering a ivy bridge cpu will beat the pants off of a sandy bridge and give a sandy bridge-E a run for its money. . .a 3770K is the way to go . .sorta sounds like he has the parts but wants to sell them to you like he just bought them new . . but i truly do not know

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July 21, 2012 6:27:47 AM

I'm thinking maybe he got the link wrong, he was pretty solid on the 2600K over the phone. Everyone makes mistakes every now and then... Anyhoo, would I be able to stick two of ATI's baddest cards in this board with that 750 PSU with an overclock on my CPU and two-three DVD burner drives, multiple fans and harddrives? I'm kind of on a limited budget here ($600) and I want to get the best bang for my buck, with focus on rendering. The website says it does support Crossfire. According to the benchmark he sent, the 3770K isnt that much faster in terms of rendering video. Is it really worth the extra money? Thank you for your replies guys!
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July 21, 2012 6:31:17 AM

Nope, those components barely use any power. Even with 6 hard drives, 750W is all you need.
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July 21, 2012 6:36:50 AM

You're not going to be overclocking anything with the P8Z77V-LX
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July 21, 2012 6:37:24 AM

Pinhedd said:
You're not going to be overclocking anything with the P8Z77V-LX

Why not?
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July 21, 2012 6:40:43 AM

PC-Newbie123 said:
Why not?


It's the lowest you can possibly get as far as Z77 boards go. The power delivery is a complete joke on that board and the tweaking options are abysmal. This will jeopardize the lifespan of your components. Don't overclock budget motherboards, ever.
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July 21, 2012 6:49:15 AM

Pinhedd said:
It's the lowest you can possibly get as far as Z77 boards go. The power delivery is a complete joke on that board and the tweaking options are abysmal. This will jeopardize the lifespan of your components. Don't overclock budget motherboards, ever.


You sound like you know what you are talking about. Would you please recommend my required parts based on my needs and budget stated in the first post? Thank you.
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Best solution

July 21, 2012 7:08:05 AM

PC-Newbie123 said:
You sound like you know what you are talking about. Would you please recommend my required parts based on my needs and budget stated in the first post? Thank you.


2600K is a steal for only $220, you're bang on in assuming that the small step to the 3770K isn't worth the extra money. The smaller die size means that while it puts out less heat overall, the temperatures are higher

You could run the 2600K on that motherboard just fine at stock but I'd be very careful if you want to overclock it long term. The LX is one of the best budget boards you can buy, there's no doubt about that, but budget components are a recipe for disaster when it comes to tweaking.

The P8Z77-V or the P8Z77-V Pro would be a bit more ideal due to the much stronger VRMs. They will cost more but that's the price of avoiding future headaches.

http://www.newegg.ca/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E1681...

Alternatively you could just go with a Z68 board instead, especially if you just get a 2600k. Like the 3770K, the Z77 doesn't offer many real improvements.

http://www.newegg.ca/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E1681...

OCZ is hit and miss as far as anything goes. They're not a universally reliable OEM.

This is one of the best PSUs available, period:

http://www.newegg.ca/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E1681...

That's not just 850 watts, that's 850 watts on the 12 volt rail alone. The price is certainly right and SeaSonic is the best for a reason.
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July 21, 2012 7:31:33 AM

Pinhedd said:
2600K is a steal for only $220, you're bang on in assuming that the small step to the 3770K isn't worth the extra money. The smaller die size means that while it puts out less heat overall, the temperatures are higher

You could run the 2600K on that motherboard just fine at stock but I'd be very careful if you want to overclock it long term. The LX is one of the best budget boards you can buy, there's no doubt about that, but budget components are a recipe for disaster when it comes to tweaking.

The P8Z77-V or the P8Z77-V Pro would be a bit more ideal due to the much stronger VRMs. They will cost more but that's the price of avoiding future headaches.

http://www.newegg.ca/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E1681...

Alternatively you could just go with a Z68 board instead, especially if you just get a 2600k. Like the 3770K, the Z77 doesn't offer many real improvements.

http://www.newegg.ca/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E1681...

OCZ is hit and miss as far as anything goes. They're not a universally reliable OEM.

This is one of the best PSUs available, period:

http://www.newegg.ca/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E1681...

That's not just 850 watts, that's 850 watts on the 12 volt rail alone. The price is certainly right and SeaSonic is the best for a reason.


Thank you for your speedy reply, but that PSU is not available. Could you recommend parts currently available at http://www.microcenter.com please? I'm looking to have this built ASAP.

Also, the price configuration should include the build cost and overclock cost of $150. Thank you very much!
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July 21, 2012 7:58:23 AM

http://www.microcenter.com/single_product_results.phtml...

This is also manufactured by SeaSonic and is nearly identical to the one I linked. Similarly it has 720 watts across the 12 volt rail alone which is more than enough.

If you're comfortable building your own PC you can save yourself some time and money. It's a great learning experience.
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July 21, 2012 8:37:11 AM

I would second that build it your self if you can. When it comes down to it is not that hard just take your time and plan every thing out before you start. Read and learn what you need to do before you start and you would not run into any real problems. The main thing is to take your time do not rush and check every thing before you move on to the next step. And the community is here if you do run into a problem.
Good luck witch every way you go.
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July 29, 2012 7:51:26 PM

Best answer selected by PC-Newbie123.
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