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Greater Impact on rendering for after effects CS5 CPU or GPU

Last response: in Graphics & Displays
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May 29, 2012 2:40:41 AM

I currently have an i5 2500k and a gtx460 video card and am unhappy with its performance rendering in after effects. I wasn't interested in much video editing when I built the system so I didnt build with that in mind. Now I want to upgrade but not sure which upgrade would give the biggest performance return, going with an i7 2700k for more threads or upgrading to a quadro 4000 video card to take advantage of the GPU assist available in after effects. Any input you guys can give is appreciated.

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May 29, 2012 3:39:57 AM

Have you looked into forcing the quadro drivers to play nicely with a geforce card? It is my understanding that they share a similar architecture, and soft mods exist to get quadro-like performance from a geforce gpu. With that in mind, a quadro card generally has much more vram than its geforce quivalent: depending on the complexity of the video you're working with, the gpu may be starved for RAM if you go with this route. Of course a quadro is several times more expensive. If money is no issue, and your machine is for productivity rather than entertainment, go quadro or firepro...

I have not even fired up after effects in some years, but I do know that photoshop cs5 supports opengl, and seems to work with my GTX570 out-of-box. Many of the bigger multimedia developers only "officially" support gpu acceleration with quadro or firepro, though pathces/work-arounds exist.
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May 29, 2012 12:57:39 PM

Thanks for the reply, I haven't tried but I will do that first and see if it helps. I really hadn't had much issue with my 460 or my system in general for that matter until trying to run AE. Its like AE just laughs at it hahahaha. I'm trying to learn AE and it compounds the frustration when your machine takes forever to render the changes you made.

Do you think going to an i7 would have any impact? I ask this because if I end up buying a quadro would upgrading to an i7 in addition do anything or should I just save that towards building a full on video editing workstation which I can add the quadro to later?
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May 29, 2012 4:01:03 PM

I personally would not upgrade to an I7 if I were you. Get gpu-z and tell me if your gpu kicks in at all when rendering. If it were me I would try to avoid buying a quadro due to the huge expense.
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May 29, 2012 4:09:29 PM

Believe me I am, I will if I have to but would rather not spend more money. I just hate when something doesn't do what I want it to. I watched a couple videos comparing AE or Premiere Pro with opengl enabled vs without it and man it looks like a world of difference. From those videos it looks like just getting the GPU to help would make more of a difference overall vs getting an i7. When I get home I'll see what I can do with the 460 and see how much it helps then make a decision. Thanks again for your advice.

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May 30, 2012 1:43:09 AM

Got the 460 to work with AE and it did help alot, shaved 3 hours off of something that took 9 hours to render previously. Still not where I want it but its a huge improvement. Rendering time still sucks but at least it doesn't take forever to preview edits. I think I can live with this until I get some money together for a new build.
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May 30, 2012 11:20:47 AM

Do you think upgrading to a video card with more memory be worth it, like a 2.5gb 570? Or will my cpu bottleneck the system?
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May 30, 2012 12:44:48 PM

My c2q q6700 barely bottlenecks my system, I think you are fine. This is one case where vram actually makes a difference. How much, I really can't say. Would you mind outlining the steps you took to get this working? Both for me and future readers :) 
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May 30, 2012 1:24:32 PM

Best answer selected by dom1121.
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May 30, 2012 1:50:29 PM

For me, it was as simple as editing a text file. I just with to c:\Program Files\Adobe\Adobe Premiere Pro CS5, found the cuda_supported_cards.txt, and added my card to the list. You may need to use CPU-Z to get the exact name of your card first. After editing the text file it wouldn't let me just save it over the original file so I saved to "my documents" then copy and pasted it back to the Premiere Pro folder to overwrite the original file.

Once you do that, you have to actually tell Premiere or After Effects to enable GPU acceleration. Before I edited the text file it wouldn't even give me the option to change it.

Here is a good site with step-by-step instructions and other info on it:
http://www.studio1productions.com/Articles/PremiereCS5-...
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May 30, 2012 2:02:18 PM

My CPU was still running at around 60% after enabling the acceleration but I think that might be because I don't have enough vram. From what I've read and I may be misunderstanding but it seems if you have less video memory than a process would need, the GPU leaves it for the CPU to handle. In my case, only having 1gb leaves more for the CPU to do.
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May 30, 2012 3:10:41 PM

I should note i didn't use the Quadro drivers, I just made Adobe think my GTX460 was an accepted card.
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May 30, 2012 8:06:42 PM

This topic has been closed by Mousemonkey
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