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Question about Powerline

Last response: in Networking
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July 26, 2011 10:06:49 AM

Hello guys,
I have heard of powerline system since several years ago but never ever had such implementation at home before.
Last week I have moved to a new place/house and I have problems with the WLAN signal strength inside the new house.
I have an idea to solve this problem by using powerline networking.

Since I am new to powerline, I want to ask something first.
Is the example configuration below possible?
Modem -----> (Devolo dLAN200) ---> electrical line first floor----> electrical line second floor---->(Devolo dLAN200) ---> normal D-Link DI-524 WLAN router (already available) ---> PCs
and also on the first floor
electrical line first floor but further away ----> (Devolo dLAN200) ---> another normal D-Link DI-524 WLAN router (again, already available).

In short, is it possible to connect the other end of the powerline to another router?

Thank you very much for your time and answer in advance.

Info (old configuration):
Modem -----> 50m networking cable ---> normal D-Link DI-524 WLAN router (already available) ---> PCs
100m networking cable from the first router ---> another normal D-Link DI-524 WLAN router

More about : question powerline

July 26, 2011 3:23:59 PM

the problem with your new layout is that your modem will only give you one IP; therefore, one of the routers will not work.

how about this layout for your current devices:

Modem -----> normal D-Link DI-524 WLAN router (already available) ---> (Devolo dLAN200) ---> electrical line first floor----> electrical line second floor---->(Devolo dLAN200) ---> normal D-Link DI-524 WLAN router (already available) setup as a AP (Access Point) ---> PCs


just one thing you should be aware of is that the Powerline adapters will not deliver the advertised speed especially over two floors since they use separate electrical circuits.

200Mb might give you around 20Mb
500Mb might give you around 35Mb

what kind of internet connection do you have? DSL or cable

can you move the modem upstairs?

using a N-router might solve the wireless coverage.

for the money you spend to buy two or three powerline devices you could buy one or two new N-routers

an ASUS RT-N12 with DD-WRT firmware can be configured as a Bridge Repeater, connecting to the main router wirelessly, to extend your wireless signal and also the LAN ports can be used to connect PC to.

the DI-524 cannot use the DD-WRT firmware
July 27, 2011 11:14:09 AM

Thank you for your answer.
The biggest problem is I can not move the modem upstairs since the ADSL cable can be found only on ground floor or cellar.
Wow! I will loose so much from different floors?
Hmmm...I will consider expanding the WLAN coverage or pulling directly the networking cable from 1st to 2nd floor.

thank you very much for your answer.

BTW. what is DD-WRT firmware ?
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July 27, 2011 12:24:03 PM

I just check the lay out of my new place...forget pulling the networking cable...I do not want to do it :) 

Hmm...I am thinking about replacing my WLAN router with a newer one, since I lost that much on Powerline, perhaps I can increase my WLAN coverage area (+ a repeater if I have to).

I want to have the new n standard for my n type capable receivers (PC and laptops have been upgraded recently), but I also still have several with the older g type receivers (old smartphones, old WLAN radios, etc.).

My questions are now:
1. Will it also working for the older g type receivers too?
2. Any suggestion which router I should buy?
3. Just in case I will need a repeater, any suggestion which repeater I should get?
July 27, 2011 2:15:45 PM

DD-WRT is a 3rd party firmware which will give additional setup option, like bridge repeater, that the manufacturer firmware does not offer. In addition in some cases it will make certain routers run more stable.

1. if you don't set the router to N-only mode, the answer is yes

2. I like Netgear 3500 or 3700, D-Link 825, and Linksys e2000 and e3000

3. I been using the ASUS RT-N12 with DD-WRT firmware

http://www.dd-wrt.com/site/support/router-database
July 27, 2011 6:57:18 PM

Thank you again.
It seems getting a new WLAN router with n standard plus a repeater or another router as repeater is the best solution I can have.

Actually, I like e3000 but it is a bit expensive, that is why I will still take a look also at your other recommendations.
Thank you very much again.
September 6, 2011 6:08:04 AM




Factually, Powerline ethernet adapter is convenient and money-save for home use.

Just need to connect a 200Mbps Powerline ethernet adapter to the modem, then all your house with the network, you just need to connect the other powerline adapter( of course should be 200mbps, too) to the electrical outlet. then you can search the internet. :p  no matter you are in the living room or bedroom or bath room. :sleep: 

It is just need 46usd per pair. signal stable. :pt1cable: 
September 7, 2011 1:08:55 AM

There are two things to consider:

Are your powerline adapters on the same phase of the electrical box (load center)? If they are on opposite phases you will need some way to get the signal to the other phase.

Can you trap the signal at your electrical box, so that it doesn't leave your home? Otherwise, your traffic will leave your residence and be exposed to other users on the circuit until it hits a transformer (which kills the signal). Also note... your traffic is going out, and you can see the traffic of other powerline users on your side of the transformer. If you can't trap the signal at the load center than you should lock down your router / switch / modem / whatever with mac filtering.

I bet there is definitive documentation on these issues. I'd be interested to hear the solutions.
September 7, 2011 8:36:02 AM

mbahr said:
There are two things to consider:

Are your powerline adapters on the same phase of the electrical box (load center)? If they are on opposite phases you will need some way to get the signal to the other phase.

Can you trap the signal at your electrical box, so that it doesn't leave your home? Otherwise, your traffic will leave your residence and be exposed to other users on the circuit until it hits a transformer (which kills the signal). Also note... your traffic is going out, and you can see the traffic of other powerline users on your side of the transformer. If you can't trap the signal at the load center than you should lock down your router / switch / modem / whatever with mac filtering.

I bet there is definitive documentation on these issues. I'd be interested to hear the solutions.


Solution: Whole-house protection from signals entering/exiting the building: large Snap-on ferrite cores over the power company leads to the house. (Must be snap-ons because you'll never get a toroid on the wire).

If only one circuit will have network, turn off breaker to circuit having network. Remove wire from breaker. Slip a few toroid cores (or long ferrite beads) over the wire. Re-install wire to breaker. Turn on breaker.

If done to all breakers, this will also work to make your smart meter really, really dumb about what you have turned on in your house.
September 8, 2011 12:34:27 AM

tigsounds said:
Solution: Whole-house protection from signals entering/exiting the building: large Snap-on ferrite cores over the power company leads to the house. (Must be snap-ons because you'll never get a toroid on the wire).

If only one circuit will have network, turn off breaker to circuit having network. Remove wire from breaker. Slip a few toroid cores (or long ferrite beads) over the wire. Re-install wire to breaker. Turn on breaker.

If done to all breakers, this will also work to make your smart meter really, really dumb about what you have turned on in your house.


Wow. That is interesting. Seriously... that does it? Does it impact the shape of the sine wave???
September 8, 2011 2:08:08 AM

mbahr said:
Wow. That is interesting. Seriously... that does it? Does it impact the shape of the sine wave???



No, the sine wave is rather difficult to alter. It absorbs the minute (mi-nute) echo'd noise generated by the devices plugged in and running. The smart meter picks up on these noise signatures of items running on house current. I know PE&E customers in California that can go online and see with amazing accuracy what they have running, right down to the refrigerator or an electric shaver. Ferrite beads or toroid cores kill the device signature toward the smart meter allowing it to only "see" how much power they are using at the moment, but not what's using it, but this is de-railing a thread, so I digress.
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