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Decreasing Cost of Build

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July 23, 2012 10:48:05 PM

I have the parts for my build, but am seeking to reduce the costs even more, even though my budget is $650 I like to decrease it to around $580-550 or possibly even lower please suggest the parts I should switch out.

Why I am building: my old computer had motherboard failure, case was overall bad, need a computer now(for work&programming

I will reuse the GPU, HDD, and optical drive
I will buy the 670 when I have enough money..

I have:

http://www.microcenter.com/single_product_results.phtml?product_id=0393422
ASUS P8Z77-V LK LGA 1155 Z77 ATX Intel Motherboard for SLI support as I will be buying 2 gtx 670's in the future.


http://www.microcenter.com/single_product_results.phtml?product_id=0388577
Intel Core i5 3570K 3.4GHz LGA 1155 Processor I am leaning to this one should i go for 2500k? Will I see a noticeable for 20$ difference?


http://www.microcenter.com/single_product_results.phtml?product_id=0354612
2 of this or this RAM?
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820233180



Corsair TX 750(is this an overkill?) is 650 enough for 2 gtx 670's?



this or this Heatsink?



and is this case too much?

overall should be around $630 including some additional purchases(thermal grease, the anti-static wristband)

More about : decreasing cost build

July 23, 2012 10:59:40 PM

I'd actually go with this for your RAM over the Corsair: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

And that PSU is good - 650W will not be able to run 2 x 670 in SLI, you'll need 750.

Then go for the 212 Evo - it's worth the difference as it includes non conductive MX-4 compound (better than Silver 5) and a stronger PWM fan.

I'm not a big fan of that case, go for something like this for the same price: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
July 23, 2012 11:22:04 PM

g-unit1111 said:
I'd actually go with this for your RAM over the Corsair: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

And that PSU is good - 650W will not be able to run 2 x 670 in SLI, you'll need 750.

Then go for the 212 Evo - it's worth the difference as it includes non conductive MX-4 compound (better than Silver 5) and a stronger PWM fan.

I'm not a big fan of that case, go for something like this for the same price: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...


So i necessarily save 10$ with the hyper EVO (so I don't have to buy arctic silver 5) is there any other motherboard you would recommend that supports dual SLI?
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July 24, 2012 12:07:43 AM

Your choice of a 3570K is as good as it gats for gaming, and the microcenter price is great.

One principle to contain costs is to not plan your build around sli.

a) How good do you really need to be?
A single GTX560 or 6870 can give you great performance at 1920 x 1200 in most games.

A single GTX560ti or 6950 will give you excellent performance at 1920 x 1200 in most games.
Even 2560 x 1600 will be good with lowered detail.
A single 7970 or GTX680 is about as good as it gets.

Only if you are looking at triple monitor gaming, then sli/cf will be needed.
Even that is now changing with triple monitor support on top end cards.

b) The costs for a single card are lower.
You require a less expensive motherboard; no need for sli/cf or multiple pci-e slots.
Even a ITX motherboard will do.

Your psu costs are less.
A GTX560ti needs a 450w psu, even a GTX580 only needs a 600w psu.
When you add another card to the mix, plan on adding 150-200w to your psu requirements.
A single more modern 28nm card like a 7970 or GTX680 needs only 550W.
Even the strongest GTX690 only needs 650w.

Case cooling becomes more of an issue with dual cards.
That means a more expensive case with more and stronger fans.
You will also look at more noise.

c) Dual cards do not always render their half of the display in sync, causing microstuttering. It is an annoying effect.
The benefit of higher benchmark fps can be offset, particularly with lower tier cards.
Read this: http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/radeon-geforce-stut...

d) dual card support is dependent on the driver. Not all games can benefit from dual cards.

e) cf/sli up front reduces your option to get another card for an upgrade. Not that I suggest you plan for that.
It will often be the case that replacing your current card with a newer gen card will offer a better upgrade path.

Why not consider a less expensive M-ATX motherboard? How many expansion slots do you plan on using?
Here is one for $110: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

For a cooler, the $30 cm hyper212 is really all you need.

Do not go cheap on psu quality. My short list of quality brands would include corsair, Seasonic, XFX, Antec and PC P&C. Sales abound, keep your eyes open.

One place to reduce costs is the case; most are perfectly functional.
Look at the Antec cases, the Antec 100 and 300 cases are good quality and do the job. 2000+ reviewers can't be far wrong:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

I suggest a 8gb kit of DDR3-1600 low profile ram. 1.5v ram does not need any heat spreaders, and tall ones may impact your cpu cooler.
Something like this:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
July 24, 2012 12:33:27 AM

Yes, All the products you selected are fine. Let me try to clear your problems.

1. 2500k performs the same as 3570k but 3570k is latest technology ie 22 nm architecture. It consumes little bit lesser power. I say buy the 3570k because you are going to run an SLI and PCI 3.0 can help a little there!

2. The Gtx 670 is a kepler card. And very power efficient. It can run in SLI in the 650 W PSU.

3. FOr a lower end case buy something which can provide good airflow to the components.

July 24, 2012 1:31:08 AM

geofelt said:
Your choice of a 3570K is as good as it gats for gaming, and the microcenter price is great.

One principle to contain costs is to not plan your build around sli.

a) How good do you really need to be?
A single GTX560 or 6870 can give you great performance at 1920 x 1200 in most games.

A single GTX560ti or 6950 will give you excellent performance at 1920 x 1200 in most games.
Even 2560 x 1600 will be good with lowered detail.
A single 7970 or GTX680 is about as good as it gets.

Only if you are looking at triple monitor gaming, then sli/cf will be needed.
Even that is now changing with triple monitor support on top end cards.

b) The costs for a single card are lower.
You require a less expensive motherboard; no need for sli/cf or multiple pci-e slots.
Even a ITX motherboard will do.

Your psu costs are less.
A GTX560ti needs a 450w psu, even a GTX580 only needs a 600w psu.
When you add another card to the mix, plan on adding 150-200w to your psu requirements.
A single more modern 28nm card like a 7970 or GTX680 needs only 550W.
Even the strongest GTX690 only needs 650w.

Case cooling becomes more of an issue with dual cards.
That means a more expensive case with more and stronger fans.
You will also look at more noise.

c) Dual cards do not always render their half of the display in sync, causing microstuttering. It is an annoying effect.
The benefit of higher benchmark fps can be offset, particularly with lower tier cards.
Read this: http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/radeon-geforce-stut...

d) dual card support is dependent on the driver. Not all games can benefit from dual cards.

e) cf/sli up front reduces your option to get another card for an upgrade. Not that I suggest you plan for that.
It will often be the case that replacing your current card with a newer gen card will offer a better upgrade path.

Why not consider a less expensive M-ATX motherboard? How many expansion slots do you plan on using?
Here is one for $110: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

For a cooler, the $30 cm hyper212 is really all you need.

Do not go cheap on psu quality. My short list of quality brands would include corsair, Seasonic, XFX, Antec and PC P&C. Sales abound, keep your eyes open.

One place to reduce costs is the case; most are perfectly functional.
Look at the Antec cases, the Antec 100 and 300 cases are good quality and do the job. 2000+ reviewers can't be far wrong:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

I suggest a 8gb kit of DDR3-1600 low profile ram. 1.5v ram does not need any heat spreaders, and tall ones may impact your cpu cooler.
Something like this:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...


For the GPU/SLI: Would you say a single gtx 670 is more than enough for games like Skyrim(with many mods) Battlefield 3 GW2 and a few others(those are the main) and will be enough for 2-3 years of High-mid end gaming? That would be my main concern with the GPU. If it is fine for decent gaming for 2-3 years I am fine with one card.

For the motherboard: I require a minimum of 2 PCI-E and 1 PCI. As I said I already have a GPU(gtx 550 ti) and will continue to use it. I also intend to do some overclocking, and require strong reliability from it. My top priority would be realibiality.

For the PSU: Would the Corsair TX650w be enough for a 670 and 550 ti?

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July 24, 2012 2:43:59 AM
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phantom1 said:
For the GPU/SLI: Would you say a single gtx 670 is more than enough for games like Skyrim(with many mods) Battlefield 3 GW2 and a few others(those are the main) and will be enough for 2-3 years of High-mid end gaming? That would be my main concern with the GPU. If it is fine for decent gaming for 2-3 years I am fine with one card.

For the motherboard: I require a minimum of 2 PCI-E and 1 PCI. As I said I already have a GPU(gtx 550 ti) and will continue to use it. I also intend to do some overclocking, and require strong reliability from it. My top priority would be realibiality.

For the PSU: Would the Corsair TX650w be enough for a 670 and 550 ti?


Skyrim does not seem to need much graphics power, the recommended graphics is a GTX260 class card.
http://www.systemrequirements.in/system-requirements-fo...
BF3 is more like a GTX 560 and a quad.
http://bf3blog.com/battlefield-3-system-requirements/

A 3570K and a GTX670 should easily exceed those recommended requirements.

I would not worry about the single card. In 2-3 years, son of kepler will have launched, and the follow on imminent.
You will have plenty of single card upgrade options before then.

The M-ATX motherboard I mentioned will not meet your requirements for two pcie-x16 slots and a pcie slot.
I might suggest this ASRock Z77 Extreme4 http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
There are two pci-e X16 slots for a GTX670, and a GTX550ti(is this for physx or??)
Even populated with two slot wide graphics cards, there is still a pci slot useable. Check the layout yourself to verify that.

All Z77 motherboards seem to overclock ok, and they all seem to be reliable. Mostly, it is the newly launched cards that need some subsequent bios updates. But by now, Z77 is well established and issues have been resollved.

As to psu needs, a GTX670 by itself needs 500w, and the real need is probably lower.
A GTX550ti, in addition, needs slot power, a max of 75w, and a single 6 pin pci-e lead, another75w, so a 650w psu should be fine.

If you want to overprovision a bit to a 750w unit, that is OK, since the psu will only draw what is demanded of it.
July 24, 2012 2:52:20 AM

Best answer selected by Phantom1.
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