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Looking for 6PM+ pocket camera with manual control

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Anonymous
August 20, 2005 7:35:22 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Hi all,

I'm seriously thinking about upgrading my current digital camera
(Olympus C-3020Z) to a more recent model. My main requirements are:

- Pocket size (so it's easier to carry when I travel)
- Manual control (aperture, shutter speed)
- At least 6MP (preferably 7MP)
- Optical zoom 3x minimum

I've already read many reviews (dpreview.com, imaging-resource.com,
megapixel.net, steves-digicams.com, ...), and I've narrowed down my
options to:

- Sony P200
- Sony W7
- Casio EX-Z750

I liked the Casio, but it has a big downside: it needs the cradle to
charge the battery. This is not acceptable to me since I plan to take
the camera with me during my trips. So, for now, I'm strongly inclined
towards the Sony P200, since the W7 doesn't have a custom white balance
(and the P200 does). The P200 also has a LCD protector, and even the
LCD being a little smaller than the W7, the P200's LCD has a higher
resolution (134K against 115K on W7).

I also considered the Canon SD500, but it doesn't have any manual
control over shutter and aperture and I've read many scary stories
about self-cracked LCDs. I've also looked at the new Olympus Stylus
800, but I found the picture quality terrible (the noise reduction is
too strong, probably because the sensor is too noisy).

So, does anyone know any other alternative to the Sony P200 that is
pocket sized, 6MP or more and has manual controls? I would also
appreciate any other comments on the Sony P200.

Thanks!
Dimitri
Anonymous
August 20, 2005 10:08:55 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

The Olympus C-60 is rated a "best buy" by Consumer Reports, and meets
the criteria you mention (compact, 6.1MP, 3x zoom, manual control).
Anonymous
August 20, 2005 11:46:48 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Dimitri wrote:
> Hi all,
>
> I'm seriously thinking about upgrading my current digital camera
> (Olympus C-3020Z) to a more recent model. My main requirements are:
>
> - Pocket size (so it's easier to carry when I travel)
> - Manual control (aperture, shutter speed)
> - At least 6MP (preferably 7MP)
> - Optical zoom 3x minimum
>
> I've already read many reviews (dpreview.com, imaging-resource.com,
> megapixel.net, steves-digicams.com, ...), and I've narrowed down my
> options to:
>
> - Sony P200
> - Sony W7
> - Casio EX-Z750
>
> I liked the Casio, but it has a big downside: it needs the cradle to
> charge the battery. This is not acceptable to me since I plan to take
> the camera with me during my trips. So, for now, I'm strongly inclined
> towards the Sony P200, since the W7 doesn't have a custom white balance
> (and the P200 does). The P200 also has a LCD protector, and even the
> LCD being a little smaller than the W7, the P200's LCD has a higher
> resolution (134K against 115K on W7).
>
> I also considered the Canon SD500, but it doesn't have any manual
> control over shutter and aperture and I've read many scary stories
> about self-cracked LCDs. I've also looked at the new Olympus Stylus
> 800, but I found the picture quality terrible (the noise reduction is
> too strong, probably because the sensor is too noisy).
>
> So, does anyone know any other alternative to the Sony P200 that is
> pocket sized, 6MP or more and has manual controls? I would also
> appreciate any other comments on the Sony P200.

The Casio Z750 wasn't out when I bought the P200. I chose it because of
its feature set. When the SD500 came out I looked at it as a
replacement but upon comparing the two cameras I decided to keep the
P200. Here is a list of the reasons I chose it over the SD500 as taken
from a previous post:

"1) The battery life and remaining charge indicator on the P200 is
better than the SD500. The P200 can give over 200 minutes of shooting
time on a charge. I have never come close to draining the battery after
a full day of shooting.

2) The lens on the P200 has no CA issue at all. The samples I saw from
the SD500 showed noticeable problems in this area. Also, the P200 lens
provides very crisp images. I was really surprised at how well its lens
performed.

3) The LCD is very well protected on the P200. You would have to subject
the camera to SERIOUS abuse to break it. I have read where many have
broken the LCDs on the SD series cameras.

4) The P200 has very, very few problems with red-eye on flash shots. The
SD500 has the typical problems seen with most small P&S cameras.

5) The P200 displays shutter/aperture/histogram information real-time
before the shot is taken. The SD500 does not. This is useful to know
because it tells you if you're about to take a picture that will have a
high probability and blur etc.

6) The P200 has a manual mode where the SD500 does not. This is the main
reason I kept the P200. Over the months I used the Sony I came to really
rely on the manual mode to get a wide range of shots that I couldn't get
with the auto settings. The P200 will sync the flash to shutter speeds
up to 1/1,000th of a second. This allows you to freeze about any action
that is within the flash's range. It also allows for flash shots at
shutter speeds that are lower (1/100, 1/200 etc.) which helps to ensure
good crisp images under a variety of circumstances. The other useful
feature of the P200 manual mode is the shutter can also extend out to 30
seconds. This allows for long exposure, low ISO night shots. I have
taken many photos this way and they really turn out great.

7) The P200 allows the user to preset the focus. This eliminates shutter
lag and greatly improves the user's ability to take quick shots of
moving objects that stay in the DOF of the camera's focus setting.
Preset focus combined with a P&S's wide DOF makes this a powerful feature.

8) The P200 is the clear price winner. You can get a P200, 1 gig MS and
possibly a spare battery for the cost of the SD500 alone.

The SD500 has some neat features like the "My Colors" but it just didn't
make up for the lack of user controls found on the P200. Once I
experienced how useful they were to me I just couldn't do without them."

Maybe this will help you make a final decision.
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Anonymous
August 21, 2005 3:20:47 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

How about the Olympus Stylus 800 Digital?

- Pocket size (so it's easier to carry when I travel) - I think so (But
not 100% sure)
- Manual control (aperture, shutter speed) - Yes
- At least 6MP (preferably 7MP) - 8MP
- Optical zoom 3x minimum - 3x


Regards
Ken.......................
Anonymous
August 21, 2005 3:55:03 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

waynedcochrane@gmail.com wrote:
> The Olympus C-60 is rated a "best buy" by Consumer Reports, and meets
> the criteria you mention (compact, 6.1MP, 3x zoom, manual control).

One thing about the P200 that I really like is the long 30 second
shutter speed in manual mode. I enjoy taking long exposure night shots
at ISO 100 and the longer shutter speed makes this possible. Not many
ultra compact P&S's have this feature.

A few things I wouldn't like about the C-60 is the 320x240 movie mode,
no AF assist lamp, 8 second minimum shutter speed, takes 7 seconds to
power up and certain features only work if you have an Olympus brand
memory card. It does have aperture and shutter priority modes which is
a nice feature. Overall though, I would still opt for the P200. The
Olympus Stylus 800 looks interesting though.
Anonymous
August 21, 2005 10:44:19 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Ken Wright wrote:
> How about the Olympus Stylus 800 Digital?

Right, teh Olympus Stylus 800 would be a nice alternative. However,
looking at the pictures took with this camera in Steve's Digicams
review, it looks to me that there is something wrong with the image
quality. I mean, my perception is that the Stylus 800 seems to have a
quite strong noise reduction processing. Just magnify a picture
(200%-300%) and pay attention to the edges of the objects...

The Sony P200 also has some considerable amount of noise in the
shadows, but not as much as the Stylus 800...

Thanks,
Dimitri
Anonymous
August 21, 2005 10:52:40 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

waynedcochrane@gmail.com wrote:
> The Olympus C-60 is rated a "best buy" by Consumer Reports

Yep, thanks! I hadn't considered the Olympus C60 yet. I'll take a look
in the reviews of the Olympus C-60. By the way, I also considered the
Canon S-70, but I discared the Canon because of its size and the shot
battery life.

Dimitri
August 22, 2005 3:02:09 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

lacunae wrote:
> On Sat, 20 Aug 2005 15:35:22 -0700, Dimitri wrote:
>
> > - Casio EX-Z750
> >
> > I liked the Casio, but it has a big downside: it needs the cradle to
> > charge the battery. This is not acceptable to me since I plan to take
> > the camera with me during my trips.
>
> The Casio battery does seem to manage ~400 shots/charge, but
> I'd get an extra battery (cheap on ebay?) and one of these chargers:
> http://sterlingtek.com/canpactrch.html
> its small, folding, and multivoltage, and I've had no probs with
> any of mine (have for a couple of my digicams)
>
> I don't really like using the camera/camcorder as the charger
> much nicer to be able to charge one battery while using up the
> other.

Although, having it as an option is always nice - I have a Sony
camcorder that uses the camera as a charger and I ended up buying a
separate charger - I use the camcorder sometimes, the charger others,
depending on the circumstances and where I am. Very flexible, and cheap
- at the above-mentioned SterlingTek it was about $15.

OTOH, my Oly C-5060 doesn't charge in-camera at all; I HAVE to bring
the separate charger on trips longer than a few days - not handy at
all; and I still have to buy a separate charger if I want to plug it in
to the cigarette plug in a car. I've ended up buying 2 spare batteries
to extend my picture taking capacity to about 600-800 pics - enough for
a busy week or two of photography without recharging.

ECM
Anonymous
August 22, 2005 3:49:42 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Sat, 20 Aug 2005 15:35:22 -0700, Dimitri wrote:

> - Casio EX-Z750
>
> I liked the Casio, but it has a big downside: it needs the cradle to
> charge the battery. This is not acceptable to me since I plan to take
> the camera with me during my trips.

The Casio battery does seem to manage ~400 shots/charge, but
I'd get an extra battery (cheap on ebay?) and one of these chargers:
http://sterlingtek.com/canpactrch.html
its small, folding, and multivoltage, and I've had no probs with
any of mine (have for a couple of my digicams)

I don't really like using the camera/camcorder as the charger
much nicer to be able to charge one battery while using up the
other.
August 23, 2005 5:49:23 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

I would look at the brand new Canon PowerShot 620:
http://web.canon.jp/Imaging/psa620/index-e.html
http://web.canon.jp/Imaging/psa620/101-e.html
7 Mpixel, 4x zoom, manual control, fast Digic II processor, etc.
Look like a real nice camera, could be the replacement for the G6 even?
Question is, how small pockets do you have?
/per

"Dimitri" <dimitri_souza@hotmail.com> skrev i meddelandet
news:1124577322.676648.298240@g44g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
> Hi all,
>
> I'm seriously thinking about upgrading my current digital camera
> (Olympus C-3020Z) to a more recent model. My main requirements are:
>
> - Pocket size (so it's easier to carry when I travel)
> - Manual control (aperture, shutter speed)
> - At least 6MP (preferably 7MP)
> - Optical zoom 3x minimum
>
> I've already read many reviews (dpreview.com, imaging-resource.com,
> megapixel.net, steves-digicams.com, ...), and I've narrowed down my
> options to:
>
> - Sony P200
> - Sony W7
> - Casio EX-Z750
>
> I liked the Casio, but it has a big downside: it needs the cradle to
> charge the battery. This is not acceptable to me since I plan to take
> the camera with me during my trips. So, for now, I'm strongly inclined
> towards the Sony P200, since the W7 doesn't have a custom white balance
> (and the P200 does). The P200 also has a LCD protector, and even the
> LCD being a little smaller than the W7, the P200's LCD has a higher
> resolution (134K against 115K on W7).
>
> I also considered the Canon SD500, but it doesn't have any manual
> control over shutter and aperture and I've read many scary stories
> about self-cracked LCDs. I've also looked at the new Olympus Stylus
> 800, but I found the picture quality terrible (the noise reduction is
> too strong, probably because the sensor is too noisy).
>
> So, does anyone know any other alternative to the Sony P200 that is
> pocket sized, 6MP or more and has manual controls? I would also
> appreciate any other comments on the Sony P200.
>
> Thanks!
> Dimitri
>
Anonymous
August 23, 2005 8:24:10 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

per wrote:
> I would look at the brand new Canon PowerShot 620:
> Question is, how small pockets do you have?

Yep, I just saw it yesterday. It has all features I would want, but the
620's size is quite bigger than the P200. In fact I believe that the
620 is about the same size as my current Olympus C3020. It just fits
really large pockets (forget about shirt pockets...).

I also looked at the new Canon SD-550, but unfortunately it still
doesn't have any manual control about shutter/aperture settings. The
SD-550 would be a perfect camera for me if it had manual controls... :( 

The other new camera from Canon that draw my attention is new Canon
S-80. It's smaller than the 620, but I'm not sure if it will fit my
budget. I mean, the maximum I'm thinking to pay for a new camera is
less than US$500. If S-80 is in this price range, probably I'll go for
it. Origiannly I was considering the S-70, but I discarded it because
the battery life is very short (compared to P200), and I would need to
by an extra battery.

Dimitri
Anonymous
August 23, 2005 8:48:42 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Dimitri wrote:
> per wrote:
>> I would look at the brand new Canon PowerShot 620:
>> Question is, how small pockets do you have?
>
> Yep, I just saw it yesterday. It has all features I would want, but
> the 620's size is quite bigger than the P200. In fact I believe that
> the 620 is about the same size as my current Olympus C3020. It just
> fits really large pockets (forget about shirt pockets...).
>
> I also looked at the new Canon SD-550, but unfortunately it still
> doesn't have any manual control about shutter/aperture settings. The
> SD-550 would be a perfect camera for me if it had manual controls...
> :( 
>
> The other new camera from Canon that draw my attention is new Canon
> S-80. It's smaller than the 620, but I'm not sure if it will fit my
> budget. I mean, the maximum I'm thinking to pay for a new camera is
> less than US$500. If S-80 is in this price range, probably I'll go
> for
> it. Origiannly I was considering the S-70, but I discarded it
> because
> the battery life is very short (compared to P200), and I would need
> to
> by an extra battery.
>
> Dimitri

I'm looking forward to the 8 MP, anti-shake 3x zoom Konica Minolta X1
a.. Width: 3.7 inches
a.. Height: 2.7 inches
a.. Depth: 0.8 inches
a.. Weight: 4.8 ounces (without battery)
$399 US, to be released 25 Sept 2005

http://tinyurl.com/8gpwp or
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/B000A7JKI...
Anonymous
August 23, 2005 9:19:45 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Dimitri wrote:
> ...
> So, does anyone know any other alternative to the Sony P200 that is
> pocket sized, 6MP or more and has manual controls? I would also
> appreciate any other comments on the Sony P200.
> ...

Another option is the Pentax Optio 750Z.

7mp
5x optical zoom
reasonably small
tilt swivel LCD
excellent movie modes
good (to my mind) ergonomics
good (to my mind) image quality
zillions of manual controls

I've got one. I like some things about it and dislike others.
My main dislikes are difficulty focusing and a tendency to
choose shutter speeds that are too low for easy hand holding
instead of goosing up the ISO sensitivity. Both of those
can be overcome by using manual controls, but other cameras
probably handle those problems more effectively with
automatic processing.

The 5x zoom is particularly nice for a camera with an optical
viewfinder (plus LCD on the back) but there is a penalty in
pincushion/barrel distortion and very slight vignetting at
the extreme ends. Usually these are not noticeable but
sometimes I've felt the need to use editing software to
correct them.

Alan
!