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New Build for Mild Photoshop CS6 and "some" gaming

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Last response: in Systems
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July 26, 2012 12:57:40 AM

Approximate Purchase Date:
Today, or once the system has been chosen

Budget Range:
<$1,000 without OS (I'm a student and can get it for ~$50.00), mouse, or keyboard

System Usage from Most to Least Important:
General web surfing, ability to run dual monitors, some Photoshop CS6 (I'm a website developer, but I'm currently getting into editing photos and digital art so I need something that won't get bogged down with huge, multi layer files during rendering and filters), and some games. I enjoy playing Civilization V and SC2, though I don't need them to be on ultra or anything.

Are you buying a monitor:
Yes

Do you need to buy OS:
No

Preferred Website(s) for Parts:
Newegg, though I have a build list using their site.

Location:
Middle Tennesse. Any store in Nashville to Knoxville is within driving distance.

Parts Preferences:
Intel, preferably. (I've had some issue with others, so I am more comfortable with Intel)

Overclocking:
Maybe. The motherboard and CPU that I have chosen are both able to be OC'd, but I am not sure that I want to do that.

SLI:
Yes. In the future I would like to, but not right now.

Your Monitor Resolution:
1920x1080 preferred.

Additional Comments:
While the CPU and Motherboard are both the Ivy Bridge (thus fairly new) and the other items are a little on the older side, I have done this, I hope I got it right, in an attempt to get something fairly inexpensively now, but that will also:
a. Operate under the tasks I throw at it; and
b. Allow for upgrading in the future, on a much cheaper method.


What I have so far:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($189.99 @ Microcenter)
Motherboard: ASRock H77 Pro4/MVP ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($97.55 @ Newegg)
Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($45.99 @ Newegg)
Hard Drive: Samsung Spinpoint F3 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($88.86 @ Outlet PC)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 550 Ti 1GB Video Card ($107.44 @ NCIX US)
Case: Antec Three Hundred Illusion ATX Mid Tower Case ($49.99 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: Antec 550W ATX12V Power Supply ($59.98 @ Outlet PC)
Optical Drive: Asus DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS DVD/CD Writer ($16.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $656.79
(Prices include shipping and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2012-07-25 20:53 EDT-0400)

Not too sure on the PSU, nor am I sure if I need any additional cooling until I decide to overclock.

Any help, advice, critiques, are welcomed. I might be able to code a complex website, I simply do not have the experience with computer builds.

Thanks.

More about : build mild photoshop cs6 gaming

July 26, 2012 1:00:58 AM

Get rid of the H77 board IMEDIATELY.
GO with a AsRock Z77 Extreme4 board
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July 26, 2012 2:36:48 AM

Why would you suggest the z77 over the h77?

Not questioning the validity of your suggestion, just trying to understand the basis of your decision.
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July 26, 2012 2:51:33 AM

if you EVER wanted to OC the H77 board wouldnt let you
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July 26, 2012 2:52:01 AM

and for the Price of the Board, and future upgrades best bang for the buck
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July 26, 2012 3:44:16 AM

Oh, thanks. I must have misread something about the h77 board.

As for the rest of the build, would it offer be a decent starting point for a substantial time period for upgrades? (read substantial as 2-4 years)
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July 26, 2012 3:53:03 AM

the things you have have to really upgrade is VGA card, and PSU if you upgrade one or the other
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Anonymous
July 26, 2012 4:08:49 AM

go for a GTX 570; the 550ti is ok in most gaming and will help with cuda support in adobe products but a 570 will provide better performance in both.

also you would benefit with having a few hard drives; a smaller 7K rpm platter to use only as a scratch disk and a big honker for your media/project files.
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July 26, 2012 4:10:26 AM

Anonymous said:
go for a GTX 570; the 550ti is ok in most gaming and will help with cuda support in adobe products but a 570 will provide better performance in both.

also you would benefit with having a few hard drives; a smaller 7K rpm platter to use only as a scratch disk and a big honker for your media/project files.



The OP said "some" gaming soo he wouldnt really give two shits. unless he is a hardcore gamer
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Anonymous
July 26, 2012 4:11:38 AM

Shockattackr said:
The OP said "some" gaming soo he wouldnt really give two shits. unless he is a hardcore gamer

i can read thank you very much
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July 26, 2012 5:10:07 AM

@looniam: While the GTX 570 will out perform the 550 ti, for my purposes, the $100+ added to the build cost is not really warranted.

Also, in regards to the HDDs, my ultimate goal is to have a 128GB (maybe more) SSD for OS and often used programs with roughly 2 (again, maybe more) mechanical HDDs. But for right now, a single 1TB HDD is sufficient. I choose the 7200 RPM, 32MB cache drive simply to keep this build on a strict cost/performance basis. I don't want to spend excessively, yet I also don't want to limit my future upgrade options either. So, for now, I'll take a little hit on performance so long as my performance upgrade options remain viable.

looniam and Shockattackr, you two have been tremendous help and have caused me to reevaluate my hardware choices.

Thanks.

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July 26, 2012 5:29:26 AM

First I wanted to start off by saying that you did a pretty good job on that build. That's something to be proud of right there, you obviously did a little homework before you came here!

Here's my suggested build...

PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/d2ci
Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/d2ci/by_merchant/
Benchmarks: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/d2ci/benchmarks/

CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($189.99 @ Microcenter)
- Good CPU, stick with it

CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($30.98 @ NCIX US)
- In case you ever decided you wanted to overclock, you need an after market cooler. Stock just wont cut it. Even if you decide against overclocking though, I'm always for having the components run cooler. This particular cooler does a great job, especially for only $30.

Motherboard: ASRock Z77 Extreme4 ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($114.99 @ Newegg)
- Fairly basic motherboard that allows OCing and SLI or CF.

Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($45.99 @ Newegg)
-Good RAM. Perfect amount, perfect speed.

Hard Drive: Samsung Spinpoint F3 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($88.86 @ Outlet PC)
- For mass storage

Hard Drive: Samsung 830 Series 64GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($84.00 @ Adorama)
- An SSD for a boot drive is a must for any 1k build. You will enjoy a substantial increase in the responsiveness of your computer as well as decreased load and boot up times.

Video Card: MSI GeForce GTX 560 Ti 448 1.25GB Video Card ($227.86 @ Newegg)
- I think this card will be a happy median between price and performance, both for computing with its CUDA cores in CS6 and also in gaming. Pretty good all around performer in those terms I think. These cards are also particularly good overclockers (supposedly anyways) so paired with MSI's TwinFrozr III cooler, you may be able to get quite a bit extra out of this card...

Case: Antec Three Hundred Illusion ATX Mid Tower Case ($49.99 @ Newegg)
- Case is good enough for your purposes I think

Power Supply: Antec 550W ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($84.99 @ SuperBiiz)
- Antec is a great PSU brand, and this should allow enough head room for overclocking GFX card and the CPU!

Total: $917.65
(Prices include shipping and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2012-07-26 01:21 EDT-0400)


Downside to this build is that if you ever wanted to SLI you would have to go get yourself a big expensive PSU. Those 560 TI 448 guzzle power, they need 38 amps of the 12V line, meaning you need a PSU that can provide 76+ amps on the 12V line. You're looking at 1000 Watt PSU territory there. To be honest though, by the time you feel the need to upgrade this, you will probably be better off getting a new card anyway instead of SLI.
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