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Review of Parts for a new build

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July 30, 2012 1:08:01 AM

Approximate Purchase Date: Near Future within Month

Budget Range: Trying to stay under 1300 USD

System Usage from Most to Least Important: mix of: gaming (light to moderate), Internet, movies, music

Are you buying a monitor: Yes / No – already did, found a Dell U2312HM from Dell.com for $239

Do you need to buy OS: No / maybe: I have an ISO for Win7 Pro SP1 64 bit, just found my product key, was a academic acquisition while taking some IT courses. Assuming that will work, if not, any opinions on Windows 8?

Preferred Website(s) for Parts: newegg.com -- essentially would prefer single vendor. I no longer live near enough to a Microcenter or I would consider grabbing some parts there.

Location: US – East Coast

Parts Preferences:
CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor
Motherboard: ASRock Z77 Extreme4 ATX LGA1155 Motherboard
Memory: Corsair Vengeance 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory
Hard Drive: Western Digital Caviar Black WD1002FAEX 1TB 7200 RPM SATA 6.0Gb/s 3.5"
Hard Drive: OCZ Vertex 4 128GB 2.5" Solid State Disk
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 670 2GB Video Card
Case: Corsair Graphite Series 600T CC600TM Mid-Tower Gaming Case
Power Supply: Corsair 600W ATX12V Power Supply
Optical Drive: LITE-ON Black Internal 12x BD Combo SATA Model iHES212-08 LightScribe Support
Monitor: Dell U2312HM – already purchased / also have an NEC LCD 1860NX Xtra View – 18 inch monitor

Overclocking: Maybe, not really sure on doing this. Are there issues / situations to avoid manual or auto (board set buttons or bios autoset)?
SLI or Crossfire: No / not at this time

Additional Comments:
I am not looking for a lot of bells and whistles, would prefer reliability.

And Most Importantly, Why Are You Upgrading:
Replacing a 9 almost 10 year old Alienware desktop.
Some pre-built systems at least used to be much better. Then again my pc is prior to Dell’s “wallmartization” of Alienware. Essentially I am still running a 3 GHz system with only the following issues: bus-side bandwidth and AGP bandwidth issues. Still have original power supply and only the CPU heatsink fan, a CoolerMaster, makes noise due to the bearings reaching end of life. The system was spec’d high end at the time along with the NEC Monitor above. For what it was going to cost to build I paid $100 over that figure to include pre-building and a 3 year warranty. The only part that “failed” was the HDD, but I think that had to do with the NTFS structure failing as the drive worked fine within my Knoppix environment.

With that said I put the parts list together above and decided to compromise on the board to Asrock. Having worked for companies that are involved in the production of the boards and CPUs, I would be more comfortable with an Intel “K” board and cpu, but most seem to recommend the Asrock.

With the parts chosen, are there any known compatibility issues?

The extent of games I might load are something along the lines of Fallout 3, is the GTX 670 overkill and are the 500 series TI Fermis still viable? Just looking at tweaking the price, I understand fully load up on video in the beginning. Movies, music and video will probably constitute majority of use.

For cooling fans, I believe this case has 3, is that adequate? CPU cooling – is the stock cooler OK on this K cpu if not overclocking?

I saw that there are some deals that run through first of August, so I was checking now as timing might be good for the back to school season.


Thanks
**********************************************************************************
I found these links useful for installing the CPU Cooler:
From CoolerMaster youtube:
Hyper 212 Plus Installation Video
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hSq_xbxsm7Q

User generated product video:
Installing an After Market CPU Cooler Fan - Cooler Master Hyper 212
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BWG73Mom4cY

More about : review parts build

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July 30, 2012 2:14:10 AM

This build looks really amazing. One thing though. Even if you're not overclocking, when you're spending so much already, go ahead and purchase a Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO. It'll be much quieter and help keep the stock chip much cooler. Plus if you ever want to try your hand at overclocking, you have a great cooler for it.
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July 30, 2012 2:43:33 AM

stant1rm said:
This build looks really amazing. One thing though. Even if you're not overclocking, when you're spending so much already, go ahead and purchase a Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO. It'll be much quieter and help keep the stock chip much cooler. Plus if you ever want to try your hand at overclocking, you have a great cooler for it.


That appears to be similiar to what I have in my pc.
All copper with 1mm copper fins and a similar fan that attaches on the top rather than the side.

Any height issue in that case that you know of?

Thanks for the update
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July 30, 2012 3:19:39 AM

Nah, Corsair makes a good case. It'll be all good.
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August 3, 2012 10:43:30 PM

stant1rm said:
Nah, Corsair makes a good case. It'll be all good.


Thanks for the information, I had initially looked at the CPU coolers but for got about.

Got the parts.
Now I just need to figure out which color is + and - for the system header.
Case connectors are labelled well though.
I am assuming the case fans connect to the MLB connectors that are clearly marked fans

I added some extra thermal paste.
I believe that I should just use a little in the center and let the flat copper bottom of cooler spread it out but not over the edges.

It appears to be a bit of a stretch to try and use the USB 3 connector on top of the case.
Basically it is a normal male connector connector and there is only a USB 3 header.
Depending on how close it cuts to the CPU cooler and the video card, I might be able to stabalize the cable not move and go out the top card blank covering slot for pcie1.
The other connector I will not use is the 1394 on top. No loss, don't have firewire devices anyway.

Thanks again
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August 4, 2012 12:36:19 AM

It's actually worse to add extra thermal paste. Thermal paste is designed to fill in the microscopic holes on the heatsink and CPU where they meet. Too much can create a sort of barrier and negatively affect cooling. My advice is to clean all the paste off now and then apply a drop about the size of a pea.

Other then that, great job!
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August 10, 2012 3:12:21 AM

stant1rm said:
It's actually worse to add extra thermal paste. Thermal paste is designed to fill in the microscopic holes on the heatsink and CPU where they meet. Too much can create a sort of barrier and negatively affect cooling. My advice is to clean all the paste off now and then apply a drop about the size of a pea.

Other then that, great job!


UPS delivered the monitor monday, fired up the computer, and all went wel.

I thought that I had mangled the CPU but it was more or less the first time usin ZIF socket.
Was able to mount the CPU cooler to push are from front of case over fins and let the back fan pull the air out.
I did add about a pea size amount of compound on CPU before connecting the cooler.

I found a video from Cooler Master that confirmed which side to mount the bracket on "Intel" boards.
I found another good one that used the same cpu cooler and detailed air flow and placement.
When I can find all my bookmarks I may post here.


As I had selected ram with higer profile radiators, I had to use slots A2 and B2 as A1 would have been blocked by the cpu cooler fan.

Thanks again for the input, the last missing part completed it.

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August 10, 2012 3:12:38 AM

Best answer selected by dunkelzahn.
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