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make it "spark" prints

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Anonymous
August 24, 2005 1:16:09 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

I'm working here with photos done by the D70 and printing them out on my
Epson 1280. I am getting decent prints, but nothing with any great
saturation or definition. Everything looks flat.

I'm trying some Fuji Premium Plus paper that I bought, (used their settings
for Epson) I had some really good snapshots from it; but now, I'm trying
8x10 and they are flat - these shots are from the canyons of Arizona and I'm
not doing anything to alter that color, yet it is not impressive.

Any thoughts would be appreciated.

Hiker

More about : make spark prints

Anonymous
August 24, 2005 1:16:10 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"HIKER4LIFE" <HIKER4@CHARTER.NET> wrote in message
news:5UPOe.10385$1g2.4132@fe05.lga...
> I'm working here with photos done by the D70 and printing them out on my
> Epson 1280. I am getting decent prints, but nothing with any great
> saturation or definition. Everything looks flat.
>
> I'm trying some Fuji Premium Plus paper that I bought, (used their
> settings for Epson) I had some really good snapshots from it; but now, I'm
> trying 8x10 and they are flat - these shots are from the canyons of
> Arizona and I'm not doing anything to alter that color, yet it is not
> impressive.
>
> Any thoughts would be appreciated.
>
> Hiker

It is assumed that you post-process your images to a certain extent.
Typical, basic adjustments are:
Levels (which effects contrast)
Color correction/white balance
Unsharp Mask (Sharpening)

I find that basic color correction (not color adding or "inventing", but
correcting for casts) is key with many shots.
If you're doing nothing at all, then I would expet your prints to look flat.

With many of my Canon shots, I find that there is routinely too much shadow
yellow, and sometimes moving only that brings it back to correct color
(Color Balance).
Anonymous
August 24, 2005 11:40:12 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Thanks for all of the thoughts and suggestions.




"MarkĀ²" <mjmorgan(lowest even number here)@cox..net> wrote in message
news:nvQOe.8509$Us5.978@fed1read02...
>
> "HIKER4LIFE" <HIKER4@CHARTER.NET> wrote in message
> news:5UPOe.10385$1g2.4132@fe05.lga...
>> I'm working here with photos done by the D70 and printing them out on my
>> Epson 1280. I am getting decent prints, but nothing with any great
>> saturation or definition. Everything looks flat.
>>
>> I'm trying some Fuji Premium Plus paper that I bought, (used their
>> settings for Epson) I had some really good snapshots from it; but now,
>> I'm trying 8x10 and they are flat - these shots are from the canyons of
>> Arizona and I'm not doing anything to alter that color, yet it is not
>> impressive.
>>
>> Any thoughts would be appreciated.
>>
>> Hiker
>
> It is assumed that you post-process your images to a certain extent.
> Typical, basic adjustments are:
> Levels (which effects contrast)
> Color correction/white balance
> Unsharp Mask (Sharpening)
>
> I find that basic color correction (not color adding or "inventing", but
> correcting for casts) is key with many shots.
> If you're doing nothing at all, then I would expet your prints to look
> flat.
>
> With many of my Canon shots, I find that there is routinely too much
> shadow yellow, and sometimes moving only that brings it back to correct
> color (Color Balance).
>
Related resources
Anonymous
August 24, 2005 12:47:37 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

HIKER4LIFE wrote:
> I'm working here with photos done by the D70 and printing them out on my
> Epson 1280. I am getting decent prints, but nothing with any great
> saturation or definition. Everything looks flat.
>
> I'm trying some Fuji Premium Plus paper that I bought, (used their settings
> for Epson) I had some really good snapshots from it; but now, I'm trying
> 8x10 and they are flat - these shots are from the canyons of Arizona and I'm
> not doing anything to alter that color, yet it is not impressive.
>
> Any thoughts would be appreciated.
>
> Hiker
>
>
Big question is what does it look like on monitor before you print?
That will tell you if problem is in printing or in taking the image in
the first place.
Anonymous
August 24, 2005 12:54:32 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Hi,

We had our Sisters (Oregon) Area Photography Club meeting yesterday and
I saw some of the best B/W prints I have ever seen taken with a digital
camera. These were from Tom Davis who used an Epson R300 printer. Just
outsatnding. The R-series of Epson printers may be something to
consider. The R300 is at the low cost end of the series but very
impressive output to 8x10. I'll try and get Tom to post some of his B/W
prints for viewing.

I'm considering the R1800 (output up to 13x19) as my next printer.

Best,

Conrad


--
Conrad
Anonymous
August 24, 2005 2:26:53 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

herein lies a problem - the images are very red on the monitor - I am in
great need for calibration and I'm trying to work that out, as well. I've
seen the recent posts on calibration and am reviewing them.

Hiker


"Don Stauffer" <stauffer@usfamily.net> wrote in message
news:0U_Oe.10$NA5.5321@news.uswest.net...
> HIKER4LIFE wrote:
>> I'm working here with photos done by the D70 and printing them out on my
>> Epson 1280. I am getting decent prints, but nothing with any great
>> saturation or definition. Everything looks flat.
>>
>> I'm trying some Fuji Premium Plus paper that I bought, (used their
>> settings for Epson) I had some really good snapshots from it; but now,
>> I'm trying 8x10 and they are flat - these shots are from the canyons of
>> Arizona and I'm not doing anything to alter that color, yet it is not
>> impressive.
>>
>> Any thoughts would be appreciated.
>>
>> Hiker
> Big question is what does it look like on monitor before you print? That
> will tell you if problem is in printing or in taking the image in the
> first place.
August 24, 2005 5:55:39 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

HIKER4LIFE wrote:
> I'm working here with photos done by the D70 and printing them out on my
> Epson 1280. I am getting decent prints, but nothing with any great
> saturation or definition. Everything looks flat.
>
> I'm trying some Fuji Premium Plus paper that I bought, (used their settings
> for Epson) I had some really good snapshots from it; but now, I'm trying
> 8x10 and they are flat - these shots are from the canyons of Arizona and I'm
> not doing anything to alter that color, yet it is not impressive.
>
> Any thoughts would be appreciated.
>
> Hiker
>
>
Look at camera settings for sharpness and saturation if you are shooting
jpeg. Most dslr images benefit from sharpening with USM before printing
- if they haven't already been sharpened enough "in camera". Not sure
if you have PS and can use that to bump up saturation and apply USM.
With my printer, the *right* amount of USM is more than looks good on
screen.
Then again, with the information you supply, your problems might be due
to something simple like not using a polarising filter.
Anonymous
August 24, 2005 5:55:40 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

frederick wrote:
> HIKER4LIFE wrote:
>> I'm working here with photos done by the D70 and printing them out
>> on my Epson 1280. I am getting decent prints, but nothing with any
>> great saturation or definition. Everything looks flat.
>>
>> I'm trying some Fuji Premium Plus paper that I bought, (used their
>> settings for Epson) I had some really good snapshots from it; but
>> now, I'm trying 8x10 and they are flat - these shots are from the
>> canyons of Arizona and I'm not doing anything to alter that color,
>> yet it is not impressive. Any thoughts would be appreciated.
>>
>> Hiker
>>
>>
> Look at camera settings for sharpness and saturation if you are
> shooting jpeg. Most dslr images benefit from sharpening with USM
> before printing - if they haven't already been sharpened enough "in
> camera". Not sure if you have PS and can use that to bump up
> saturation and apply USM. With my printer, the *right* amount of USM
> is more than looks good on screen.
> Then again, with the information you supply, your problems might be
> due to something simple like not using a polarising filter.

Good thoughts. Hiker might also look at "Curves". I read of a
quasi-religion that insists every necessary manipulation can be
accomplished in Curves. Disremember the name of the guru.

My experience is that the "pop" comes from a combination of low or
moderate UnSharp Masking, mild Curves, and very minor but real
saturation increases. They all work better on images from good,
contrasty lenses.

--
Frank ess
!