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I3-2100 upgrade possibility?

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July 31, 2012 2:14:51 AM

OK, the big argument I see about i3-2100 and AMD Phenom II 965 Black Edition is that i3-2100 allows me to upgrade in the future to the i5.

Both cost the same (but the big argument AMD fans give is ocing which might require a $20 fan raising the price to $110)

^BTW I live about 20 minutes from a Micro Center.

My Intel MOBO I'm considering: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

My AMD MOBO: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
- I'm not sure this Motherboard supports OCing at all. The OC might defeat the purpose of the Phenom II for me.


The Intel Motherboard is a tad bit pricey compared the the AMD one, though. In the end if I found a $90 Intel Motherboard able to upgrade to the i5 it would come to the same price for both.


But the big argument is,


The Intel is always better because I can upgrade to i5 or i7 in the future. AMD seems....shakey from what I've read.

Any help?


BY THE WAY. I almost forgot! The purpose of the processor is GAMING.


I've read that certain newer games need more cores to run better but certainly the FPS difference won't be huge?


I think I might want to buy the 6850, 6870, or 6950. I'm still debating. I'll decide once I see my ultimate component price in my cart.
a b B Homebuilt system
July 31, 2012 2:18:19 AM

You're correct that most games are not CPU intensive, but a few new ones (like Skyrim) are.

What is your budget?
a c 118 B Homebuilt system
a b V Motherboard
July 31, 2012 2:30:32 AM

Quote:
The Intel is always better because I can upgrade to i5 or i7 in the future. AMD seems....shakey from what I've read.


My opinion I'm going to give you is, wait til you have enough money to buy the i5. Yes I've heard the "i3 has the better upgrade path" argument before, and I'm sorry to say, that anyone who thinks thats a good argument probably does not make the wisest financial decisions. I won't come out and call them stupid, but I definitely wouldn't take a stock tip from em either. I'm just sayin, they're probably the guy who wins a $100 bucks on a scratch off lottery ticket, and goes back in and blows the winnings on more scratch offs. :sarcastic: 


First off, it is known that Intel uses a CPU socket for 2 years and ditches it. And next year Intel is due for a socket change, LGA1150 towards mid 2013. Which means if you want the most current i5 at that time (Haswell) you'd be looking at a new motherboard. Or you can buy an older generation Ivy Bridge, sounds great? Sure, its unlikely Haswell will be a vast improvement over Sandy/Ivy (computer advancement is done in baby steps not vast leaps)

But the problem with this is, if you're planning on basically throwing away that perfectly functional i3 CPU within a year to a year and a half, thats just plain stupid financially speaking. Computers go obsolete fast enough without you helping it.

My advice is to figure out what kind of build will meet your needs today and something reasonable, lets say for 3-4 years. If you think the i5 will meet your needs, then save money until you can afford it, your wallet will thank you for it.

------

Quote:
I've read that certain newer games need more cores to run better but certainly the FPS difference won't be huge?

It certainly can be substantial in certain cases. Although these cases generally involve high graphic, resolution and detail settings beyond the capabilities of 6850s/6870s/and to some degree 6950s.

The AMD mobo does support overclocking btw, the Intel one does not. As far as the argument requiring a CPU fan, so what? If you buy a $20 CPU fan to overclock the Phenom II, its still cheaper than an i3-2100. And while the 2100 may achieve a small unnoticeable victory in gaming FPS, should you find yourself in a situation doing video editing, media encoding, or trying record a game while playing it to make a youtube video with a program like Hypercam, guess what? That overclocked Phenom II is going to downright embarrass the i3-2100.

What exactly is your final budget? And what needs to be bought with that? Your name sounds familiar, did we meet in another thread?
Related resources
a b B Homebuilt system
a b V Motherboard
July 31, 2012 2:37:06 AM

http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/build-gaming-pc-ove...

4 cores are certainly better, especially when it comes to games that can utilize them. if you like what you see above, the i3 is a rather nice start if you plan to upgrade to an i5 in the future, but will nevertheless be a bottleneck in some games

http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/gaming-fx-pentium-a...

the Phenom II X4 9** series is still a good cheap CPU if you plan to OC, but it is slowly showing it's age. while the above may show that it performs close to an i3-2100 when OC'd to 4ghz, it will definitely perform better in games that utilize 4 cores (BF3 64 players map, for example).

the question here is if you wanna spend a bit more soon in the future for an upgrade, or OC a good, aging CPU that'll probably lasts another year or two (unless Piledriver delivers, fingers crossed)?
July 31, 2012 4:01:06 AM

As a matter of fact we have. But I recognize your avatar. Which leads me to believe that it's time for me to get an avatar!

And this was incredibly informative! i just posted an Intel build for critique, but I just don't want to spend the money on the i5.

And both processors cost exactly the same ($90) <--Micro Center

My budget is $550-600. I'm willing to allow a little bit over but I'm not going to start going to $650 because, let's face it...we all know where that leads!

But I like the argument you made. I was hoping to keep this motherboard for at least 3-4 years. AT LEAST. :) 

I am truthfully at a loss.

They're two impressive processors...each at $90.

I love to overclock.
I hate to completely remove and overhaul my computer....
But I want the power for my games. I don't want to lose power on my $175 GPU.


But doesn't AMD also change sockets every 2 years or so? Plus I hear that the upgrades aren't as good.
a c 118 B Homebuilt system
a b V Motherboard
July 31, 2012 4:17:58 AM

I thought so. I will say it usually makes things easier to keep things to one thread, so we don't have to chase you all over the forums to keep up with the evolving changes to the system. We know you'll probably change your mind on different parts a bunch of times before you finally settle on one.

If they're both the same price, honestly, I'd go for the Phenom II with the $20 CPU cooler if the i5 isn't what you want.

Quote:
I love to overclock.

Not an option with the i3.

Quote:
I hate to completely remove and overhaul my computer....

Well, really the only things that need changed are the mobo and CPU as far as going Intel or AMD. Everything else works on both.

Quote:
But doesn't AMD also change sockets every 2 years or so? Plus I hear that the upgrades aren't as good.


They tent to use sockets a little longer, and often give backward compatibility. And currently yes, Phenom II is as good as it gets for gamers form AMD. Unless PileDriver manages to pull something decent off, really too soon to tell. I wouldn't hold my breath.

Although really the point that I was trying to make when I brought it up was that you should buy a CPU that does what it needs to do for 3 or 4 years, any time beyond that, no matter which way you go, the most viable option both financially and performancewise is almost certainly going to include a new motherboard.

Take this for example. If someone posted and said they had an older LGA775 mobo with a Core2Duo and wanted to upgrade so they could do video editing or something. It would be silly for me to tell them to run out and go buy a Core2Quad to stick on it. No, I would be telling them to look at LGA1155 mobos with Sandy Bridge i5 CPU.

The point is to get the CPU that can do what you need it to do for a couple years, and not upgrade it at all. Now of course there are some certain circumstances where upgrading a CPU and keeping the same mobo might be the better option, but usually not. Particularly with Intel CPUs as they tend to not drop in price very much despite being prior generation. You can look at what few first gen Intel Core CPUs newegg has left, they're still as expensive as the day they were brand new, (and they're 3 years old now)




July 31, 2012 5:23:57 AM

If you can wait, I would get the i3 IB version (release date is 3rd quarter 2012). When the i5 IB came out, i5 SB become less popular.....there is/wasn't much difference in pricing between the i5-2400/i5-2500K and i5-3450/i5-3570K.

Dave
a c 118 B Homebuilt system
a b V Motherboard
July 31, 2012 6:14:02 AM

DavidY said:
If you can wait, I would get the i3 IB version (release date is 3rd quarter 2012). When the i5 IB came out, i5 SB become less popular.....there is/wasn't much difference in pricing between the i5-2400/i5-2500K and i5-3450/i5-3570K.

Dave


What would be the point in that? Ivy Bridge costs more and doesn't even manage a 1% improvement in gaming performance.

!