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Computer components matching software

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August 1, 2012 7:10:38 PM

Hello experts!

I'm currently at the inception of developing a software to match computer components.
every component exposes a physical interface, which allows integration with related hardware.
although these are the minimum requirements ( + power reqs, and perhaps more), often some components who match on paper, do not integrate very well.


with that in mind, id like your input on two areas:

1. based on your knowledge and experience, what common features of a component (cpu, motherboard, case etc) should be considered beyond the physical interface requirements of the different components, in order to integrate well with each other.

2. what features would you expect or want such software to deliver?

every input is valued and welcomed,

and of course feel free to correct me if I'm wrong.

THANKS!

Guy.
a b B Homebuilt system
August 1, 2012 7:26:56 PM

Is this software application supposed to be some sort of compatibiliy tool? Please explain more on what the application is expected to do.
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August 1, 2012 7:39:57 PM

essentially it is an information system, with the purpose of presenting data about products and calculating compatibility between two or more hardware components.

the goal is to assist people who custom build their PC rig with information regarding physical interface compatibility and constraints such as dimensions, power consumption and more.
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a b B Homebuilt system
August 1, 2012 7:54:31 PM

Where do you plan to implement this tool? In a business setting?

Compatibility of the physical interfaces is pretty straight forward, as is the power requirements for most components. This information is genreally provided with products and can be found both where they are sold and at the manufacturers websites.
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a b B Homebuilt system
August 1, 2012 8:00:58 PM

apparently the op has created a sister post...

i have listed a few requirements.

http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/24141-10-component-ma...

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@COLGeek

to most of us such things as physical compatabilities and power requirements are a rather simple ordeal. we are posting on a tech forum after all. do remember though the multitude of users asking for build advice who lack the knowledge or experience to know what to look for. this is not to say that they cannot learn or do well but some just do not have the time, do not feel they can, or do not want to put forth the effort. having such a tool will be valueable to such people as long as it is up to date and informative.

such a tool however is a crutch and it is always adviseable to actually do the research yourself.
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a b B Homebuilt system
August 1, 2012 8:06:25 PM

ssddx said:
apparently the op has created a sister post...

http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/24141-10-component-ma...

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@COLGeek

to most of us such things as physical compatabilities and power requirements are a rather simple ordeal. we are posting on a tech forum after all. do remember though the multitude of users asking for build advice who lack the knowledge or experience to know what to look for. this is not to say that they cannot learn or do well but some just do not have the time, do not feel they can, or do not want to put forth the effort. having such a tool

Agreed. That is why I am asking how the tool will be used. Knowing where it is to be implemented and who the target users will be are essential to designing such a system.

This is really a straight forward database of key properties and a "look up" function (likely a web enabled front end) to match compatible devices.
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a b B Homebuilt system
August 1, 2012 8:09:48 PM

Also, asking questions should help the designer(s) in their architecture design (relational db vs flat file db, etc).
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August 1, 2012 8:32:29 PM

great input guys!

assume that this system is free, online, social and editable by select people. also that products contain detailed information and reviews by users.

how would you feel about the following:

1 - inputting your own rig combined with specifics regarding the components.

2 - recommending other people with rigs/components found in the database based on your expertise in a field (mobos, screens)

3 - creating custom rigs from database products and assigning them a classification of use (gaming, video editing etc).

these steps are to help build the database, and assist a learning algorithm to find best matches based on user's experience.



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Best solution

a b B Homebuilt system
August 1, 2012 9:05:35 PM

in the interest of keeping the thread in one place... i have transposed my comments to this thread. the other thread should be abandoned.

-check component physical connections
*cpu to mobo
*gpu to mobo
*ssd/hdd to mobo
*cpu cooler to mobo
*number of drives to case constraints
-check psu requirements
*maximum component draw + 10-15% versus psu capacity
*main pin arrangement to mobo requirements
*aux power cables to mobo requirements (# of)
*gpu power cables to gpu requirements (# of)
*sata connectors to ssd/hdd/optical devices (# of)
*molex connectors provided (# of)
-component compatabilities
* ram type (ie, ddram, sdram, ddr3) to mobo requirements
* number of ram sticks to mobo requirements (for dual channel or triple channel)
* total ram to recommended specs for various usages (ie basic, gaming or professional)
*sli or crossfire combatabilities
*boot drive size to maximum drive size supported by os
- cooling
*total heat output (or an estimate thereof) compared to case size, number of fans, size of fans and fan outputs.
*cpu heatsink compatabilities with case sizes (general estimates)
*reminder to include cpu thermal paste as part of a build
*possible inclusion of recommended watercooling calculator to estimate required radiators and pumps (optional).
- component duplication
*intelligent response to allow no gpu to be selected when a motherboard has onboard video.
*intelligent response to allow no soundcard to be selected when a motherboard has onboard sound.
*intelligent response to allow for sli or crossfire
- interface with perepherals
*outputs for sound, video and data compared with selected number of devices and inputs.
- price vs performance
*sort items based on performance scores, performance vs price averages and price.
*provide estimated system performance marks between builds


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perhaps the most important of all is that it has a comprehensive list of all hardware from at least 3 years ago included as well as any new hardware going forward. new hardware to hit the market would need to be added as soon as possible (within 1-2 weeks).

second to that would be what said software would cost. be aware that an ad-based program paid for entirely by on screen ads or deals with retail websites would be superior to having the customer pay for such software. i doubt any professional companies will buy said software as they employ professionals who already know what they are doing.

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a b B Homebuilt system
August 1, 2012 9:21:39 PM

the first thing that should be done is to compile a database of the tangible properties of all the components such as the things in the list i compiled above.

such things as rating performance and providing baseline rigs to build from should come after this is complete. also remember that this would just be a general guideline as recomendations are varied. by choosing a category for the system (basic, gaming, performance, etc) the software should show minimum recommendations to the user. for example a minimum recommendation of 4-6gb of ram for a gaming system or 8gb of ram for a cad/cam/3d rendering machine.

those of us who have built several systems know that product ratings are a big factor in choosing a part and not just specifications. for best results parts should be tied to a good source of product ratings such as newegg or other retail outlets.

we also have favored brands due to past experiences. personally i favor intel cpus, asus motherboards, mushkin ram, evga video cards, ocz ssds and wd hard drives. i also favor nvidia designs versus ati/amd due to my preferences in driver softwares. most often we recommend products in our "comfort zone" which are products we have used personally or manufactured by brands we trust.

personally i prefer to buy nothing but top end components. buying just one step below the bleeding edge offers great long term performance while the cost is not quite as steep as buying bleeding edge. buying components on their way out (6 month old technology) is great for the budget but might mean an upgrade closer in the future than expected.

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a b B Homebuilt system
August 1, 2012 9:30:21 PM

what i currently use:

intel i7-920
asus rampage iii rog edition
mushkin enhanced 3x 2gb sticks (not sure on model #)
evga gtx 470
2x ocz vertex2 80gb ssd
2x wd caviar black 1.5tb hdd (see note)
corsair obsidian full tower case
corsair professional 1000w psu
razer deathadder mouse
(keyboard in process of being replaced, using a backup)
40" sony bravia 1920x1080 lcd ccfl 60hz television
sound via dvi-to-hdmi cable linked to receiver and home theater system.

note: use 1tb drives instead of the 1.5tb versions. there are reliability issues currently. i've replaced them over 3 times already (under warranty).

the system is at least 2 years old now but at the time i built it i would say it was in the performance category. in current trends i would put it at least in the above average category but that opinion may differ.
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August 8, 2012 11:57:20 AM

Best answer selected by guymonzy.
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December 4, 2012 2:10:15 AM

Hi guymonzy,

Just wondering if you got anywhere with this??

Shando
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