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HD 7750 not responding properly

Last response: in Graphics & Displays
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June 11, 2012 6:05:54 PM

Hello guys, I've recently installed a HIS HD 7750 into my computer and it ran fine for about a week. Then I suddenly started getting the blue screen of death whenever I watch any streams or videos while full screen on sites like justin.tv or youtube. A couple days later, things gotten worse when my computer isn't able to start up properly. Every time I boot up the computer it automatically takes me to the start up repair and forces me to do a restore point.

I have tried to uninstall all the drivers under programs and features, but it tells me that the ATI drivers needs to be repaired, when I press the repair button, it does nothing. As of right now, my video card isn't responding and I have to switch over to the standard VGA input. I know that I properly installed the card cause I disabled my integrated card and all its drivers in safe mode and installed the most current drivers from the HIS site in safe mode as well. I have also updated my BIOS hoping it will make everything run a lot smoother. I'm currently running window 7, 64bit. Any help will be greatly appreciated.

below is the link to the specs of my computer

http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/document?lc=en&dlc=e...

June 11, 2012 6:13:56 PM

Also, when I look at the Hd 7750 under the device manager, it has a caution symbol on it and under properties it says "the device cannot find enough free resource that it can use. If you want to use this device. You will need to disable one of the other devices on this system." The funny thing is that my integrated card is disabled. I also forgot to mention that whenever I boot up my computer, it gives me the message "no amd graphics driver is installed or the amd driver is not functioning properly."
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June 11, 2012 6:20:08 PM

Computers working fine until they start spontaneously rebooting or failing to boot are common signs of dying PSUs.

Depending on how crappy OEM PSUs in HP's OEM builds are, your PSU might have already been about to die even before you added the GPU and the GPU simply helped finish it off quicker.

I owned my fair share of generic $20 PSUs in the 250-350W range and most of them failed due to leaking caps after a few years even though they probably never got loaded beyond 150W.
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June 11, 2012 6:28:17 PM

Damn, I got this card hoping that I wouldn't have to replace my psu in the first place. I've asked plenty of people on this site before buying the card if it is compatible with my computer and they all said that the wattage on my computer is fine.
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June 11, 2012 6:37:13 PM

Are you sure its the PSU since all the errors on my computer is telling me that its a driver problem?
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June 11, 2012 6:40:54 PM

In principle, yes, a 7750 should have no problem with a half-decent 300W PSU in good working order. The problem is I doubt HP and most bargain-basement system OEMs put more budget than absolutely necessary in their PSUs since the majority of their systems won't ever be opened by their end-users.

PSU is the most common cause for the problems you listed in your initial post but it could also be something else. If you have a spare known-good PSU on-hand or can borrow one, you should try this first so you do not end buying a new PSU for nothing.

If you do buy a new PSU, I strongly recommend looking for something with at least 80+ Bronze certification which significantly raises the bar on the minimum quality you are likely to get when compared to PSUs with no 80+ certification whatsoever.
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June 11, 2012 6:54:46 PM

the 7750 would have worked, if the psu was still enw and nothing was wrong with it. really that is what happens when one shoves off the heart of the machine, the power supply. although not as beneficial, it would have been wise to buy like a cheap certified psu ranging from 40-50$ and buying a cheap gpu i.e a ddr3 6670 because it would have worked 100% assuming the psu could fit into the case.
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June 11, 2012 7:30:03 PM

dudewitbow said:
the 7750 would have worked, if the psu was still enw and nothing was wrong with it. really that is what happens when one shoves off the heart of the machine, the power supply. although not as beneficial, it would have been wise to buy like a cheap certified psu ranging from 40-50$ and buying a cheap gpu i.e a ddr3 6670 because it would have worked 100% assuming the psu could fit into the case.


I would of bought a 6670, but i heard it consumes more power than the 7750. The case itself is cramped as it is, so I didn't want to put in a new power supply. Plus it would of went over my budget of $100. The computer itself is less than 3 years old, so I wouldn't say its brand new, but its not an antique either. I heard if a psu is bad, then the computer won't be able to even stay on. Right now, I'm running my computer fine without the video card.
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June 11, 2012 8:01:34 PM

donutxjai said:
I heard if a psu is bad, then the computer won't be able to even stay on. Right now, I'm running my computer fine without the video card.

If a system works fine on IGP but starts mysteriously shutting down, rebooting or fail to boot after a few days/weeks with add-in graphics, it is a strong indication that the PSU is unable to reliably supply the extra power. While the system may be working fine now that you removed the GPU, it may only be a matter of time until the PSU degrades further and become unable to reliably power your PC even without add-in graphics.

A bad PSU does not necessarily mean it won't be able to power up a system, it can also mean that the PSU is failing to provide its stated output rating either due to aging, bad engineering or both. A three years old cheaply made PSU could very well be ripe for trouble.
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June 11, 2012 8:13:31 PM

Best answer selected by donutxjai.
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June 11, 2012 9:14:15 PM

This topic has been closed by Mousemonkey
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