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Dell Dimension Upgrade- need opinions

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August 2, 2012 11:06:27 PM

Hello, I need a computer for school this semester and am willing to spend around $500. Basically, I have two options: 1) Upgrade the old p.o.s. desktop computer (Dell Dimension 4700) I already have or 2) purchase a new tower from Best Buy.

If I go the route of upgrading the Dell desktop, which is over 8 years old and in poor shape, I imagine I would have to replace most of the parts.

These are the current specs to this desktop:
processor- Intel Pentium 4 HT 3.2 GHz
motherboard- Intel 915G Express
RAM- DDR2 SDRAM (512 mb)
Hard Drive- 80.0 GB - Standard - Serial ATA-150 - 7200.0 rpm
graphics- Intel GMA 900 Dynamic Video Memory Technology 3.0 (integrated)
optical drives- CD-RW - IDE + DVD-ROM
power supply- 305 W

I am assuming I need to replace the processor, MB, RAM, Hard Drive, graphics card, and the power supply (not sure if I need to replace the optical drives or not). So basically everything. I'm trying to figure out what I can keep and still have a decent rig but I'm not totally sure. Ive made a list of parts from new egg:
$110 processor- AMD Phenom II X4 965 Black Edition Deneb 3.4GHz
$85 MB- ASRock 970 EXTREME3 AM3+
$46 RAM- G skills 2 x 4gb
$90 Hard Drive - Seagate Barracuda ST1000DM003 1TB 7200 RPM
$65 graphics- SAPPHIRE Radeon HD 6670 1GB 128-bit DDR3
$46 power supply- Thermaltake TR2 W0070RUC 430W ATX12V V2.2
This all comes out to be $442.

Please give me an opinion on this list to make it better and help bring down my price if possible. I would also like an opinion
on whether to replace parts on my old computer or just by a new one from best buy.
a b B Homebuilt system
August 3, 2012 12:58:40 AM

I would buy a new one if you'v never built one before. You can add a basic video card such as the 6450 to use for gaming if needed. You don't include a new case or windows operating system, so $600 is a more realistic budget if you build it yourself. Here's a great deal at your local staples if you can still find one in stock: http://www.fatwallet.com/forums/topic_view.php?catid=74...
August 3, 2012 3:05:28 AM

o1die said:
I would buy a new one if you'v never built one before. You can add a basic video card such as the 6450 to use for gaming if needed. You don't include a new case or windows operating system, so $600 is a more realistic budget if you build it yourself. Here's a great deal at your local staples if you can still find one in stock: http://www.fatwallet.com/forums/topic_view.php?catid=74...


I have built a computer before a couple of years ago. I don't really need it for gaming, just a decent computer for school.
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August 3, 2012 7:49:20 AM

Build a system with a H77 motherboard and a ivy i5-3450, and just use the on board graphics of the CPU. Put the extra money towards 8GB of RAM.
August 3, 2012 11:45:16 PM

jk47_99 said:
Build a system with a H77 motherboard and a ivy i5-3450, and just use the on board graphics of the CPU. Put the extra money towards 8GB of RAM.


Do I need a graphics card? I was under the impression I needed some kind of graphics card?
a b B Homebuilt system
August 4, 2012 1:44:28 AM

You may use the Intel onboard video if you aren't a gamer. I use a low end 210 nvidia card that frys had for 27 cents after rebate recently. Still an improvement over any onboard stuff. If you don't like noise, be sure to read some newegg reviews about cards; some have tiny noisy fans; I chose a fanless model for this reason.
August 4, 2012 1:48:28 AM

The i5-3450 has a intel hd graphics 2500 chip inside and will be good enough for watching movies and some low graphics setting gaming. It just depends how important gaming is, only then do you need to consider adding a graphics card.

If you want to stick with AMD, get a APU like this by combing your cpu and gpu budget http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
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