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I have epicfailed

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August 3, 2012 7:20:40 AM

i read some guides did everything every guide said and every attempt the past 36 hours have failed.
most guides where apparently outdated compared to the current version of ubuntu. But, still I've never run into so many problems with something. I seemed to have entered each command in properly etc etc installed all the software in when guides would say too. I still fing failed. I get more errors than i ever thought possible.

All i wanted to do was create a VNC for my home. cause it was going to be fun and I'd like to have a usable computer without losing my monitors on my main computer. The idea was perfect. The guides made it seem relatively simple.
But, i failed.

So, if anyone has any ideas of an updated guide or whatever the hell could assist me in finishing this damn thing before i throw it out a window please post here thanks.

More about : epicfailed

a c 105 B Homebuilt system
August 3, 2012 7:30:35 AM

So... what is the problem?
If its an issue with Linux, I will say right now I know nothing of how to use Linux OS's, so dont expect much help from me.
But clearly defining the problem would be helpful for those who can help.
a b B Homebuilt system
August 3, 2012 7:34:52 AM

There's an appropriate saying here,

Linux is only free if your time is worthless

The learning curve for getting into it is incredibly steep and as you've already seen, sometimes the documentation is either out of date, missing steps, or outright incorrect.

The best thing I can suggest is to keep at it. There are a number of Ubuntu distributions (much less other flavors of Linux), some are better than others and may be better documented.

I've been working with Linux for many many years and I often find errors in documentation. The documentation is often not written by professional writers like it is for major commercial applications but by the developers themselves or even community activists.
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a c 118 B Homebuilt system
August 3, 2012 7:51:53 AM

I agree. Linux can have a hell of a learning curve. I ran Linux for 4 years as my only OS on my old Dell 8200. Windows XP crashed on it and I had longsince lost the disk, and being poor I needed something that was free. I taught myself, and believe me it took some doing.

I use Windows7 on my new computer only because I got it for free from Windows Academic Alliance, I'd probably still be running Linux if not. (I have Ubuntu on my 2nd hard drive, but I rarely use it)

I would say Ubuntu is probably one of the more user friendly distros out there. I've tried Fedora (Red Hat) and, Linspire. Although this was years ago, Fedora was probably my favorite.
a b B Homebuilt system
August 3, 2012 7:58:30 AM

nekulturny said:
I agree. Linux can have a hell of a learning curve. I ran Linux for 4 years as my only OS on my old Dell 8200. Windows XP crashed on it and I had longsince lost the disk, and being poor I needed something that was free. I taught myself, and believe me it took some doing.

I use Windows7 on my new computer only because I got it for free from Windows Academic Alliance, I'd probably still be running Linux if not. (I have Ubuntu on my 2nd hard drive, but I rarely use it)

I would say Ubuntu is probably one of the more user friendly distros out there. I've tried Fedora (Red Hat) and, Linspire. Although this was years ago, Fedora was probably my favorite.


Ubuntu is probably the best place to start. Canonical deserves a lot of credit for making it almost usable as a generic desktop OS. Unfortunately some of the liberties they took in the process have been... problematic at best. There are still a ton of problems and it's about 5-6 years behind Windows but it is much better than it was in the mid 2000s.

Ubuntu's duality as a desktop OS and server OS is extremely desirable which is why I use it as my primary distro (xUbuntu, because I think Gnome3 and unity look like ass). Linux also virtualizes extremely well
August 3, 2012 8:57:16 AM

I've used the linux mint reg version a lot before and never had a problem. Never did as much with it but. Right now my simple attempt was to create a VNC server so i can run this computer without my monitor/keyboard and not have it in the way. But, I failed. Now i find a video on youtube explaining how the current version has most of it already built in.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GY75u6TthH4

talk about facepalm. and i surely did.
That video and the features like that should be more ephasised. Cause I looked for 2 days almost for setting it up ubuntu and i find it after going relatively insane and going on youtube...

Anyways, yeah I've never really understood much about ubuntu this is my first time using this one. Nor do i really understand the whole line for this software.

but, if i got what i read before right. then ubuntu is just Linuxmint with some stuff added to it?

the basics of my post as to me failing. I spend almost all my time on computers and such. It was really sad how basically destroyed i was by this.

Once I've covered the basics and know well to use the terminal. Would you recommend going to regular linuxmint or would KDE be a better bet?

Also, something I couldn't find. ubuntu 12.04 uses which linux destro when im downloading a file. when i was looking at downloads gave me 7 different versions of the software to use.
a b B Homebuilt system
August 3, 2012 9:43:38 AM

gamerxavier said:
I've used the linux mint reg version a lot before and never had a problem. Never did as much with it but. Right now my simple attempt was to create a VNC server so i can run this computer without my monitor/keyboard and not have it in the way. But, I failed. Now i find a video on youtube explaining how the current version has most of it already built in.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GY75u6TthH4

talk about facepalm. and i surely did.
That video and the features like that should be more ephasised. Cause I looked for 2 days almost for setting it up ubuntu and i find it after going relatively insane and going on youtube...

Anyways, yeah I've never really understood much about ubuntu this is my first time using this one. Nor do i really understand the whole line for this software.

but, if i got what i read before right. then ubuntu is just Linuxmint with some stuff added to it?

the basics of my post as to me failing. I spend almost all my time on computers and such. It was really sad how basically destroyed i was by this.

Once I've covered the basics and know well to use the terminal. Would you recommend going to regular linuxmint or would KDE be a better bet?

Also, something I couldn't find. ubuntu 12.04 uses which linux destro when im downloading a file. when i was looking at downloads gave me 7 different versions of the software to use.


Hah. If you're not confused yet you're going to be in a few minutes.

Linux Mint is actually an Ubuntu derivative, not the other way around. Mint pulls heavily from Ubuntu's upstream changes which means that it lags a little bit behind. Mint also packages some proprietary and non-free software (not covered under a free-software licence which makes it a bit more 'complete' out of the box. Ubuntu itself is based on Debian but doesn't follow its release schedule like how Mint follows Ubuntu. Mint also has an edition that's based directly on Debian itself.

On top of the core toolset it is possible to drop a number of different UIs.

Ubuntu's default UI is based on Gnome 3 which is built on the GTK+ 3.x toolkit which is maintained by the Gnome development team. It is possible to install the reference Gnome 3 desktop environment with little effort.

It is also possible to install the classic Gnome 2 desktop environment which is based on the GTK+ 2.x toolkit.

xUbuntu uses XFCE as the default desktop environment. XFCE is based on the GTK+ 2.x toolkit as well so it looks and feels very similar to Gnome 2. XFCE is less resource intensive and more stable than Gnome 2 and Gnome 3.

lUbuntu uses the LXDE desktop environment which is even less resource intensive than XFCE. LXDE is also based on the GTK+ toolkit; you may be noticing a trend here. It looks a lot like the offspring of xUbuntu and Windows 3.1

kUbuntu uses the KDE desktop environment as its default UI. KDE is based on the QT4 toolset and looks a lot like Windows. KDE is what you get if you put Windows XP in a blender with a BSOD, Kernel panic, and all the error messages since Y2K. It looks nice but it does not play nice. IMO KDE 4+ is one to avoid for now

It is possible to have Gnome 3, Gnome 2, KDE, and XFCE all installed at the same time. The only difference between Ubuntu 12.04, xUbuntu 12.04, and kUbuntu 12.04 is the packages that are installed by default. They all still pull from the same upstream repositories. Installing `kubuntu-desktop` from within Ubuntu 12.04 will install KDE and the associated applications. Similarly, installed `xubuntu-desktop` will install XFCE and the associated applications. Since all the GTK+ based applications are compatible regardless of which UI they are run under it is possible to run a Gnome application in XFCE and vice versa. Each interface comes with its own set of applications and these are often rolled into the respective Ubuntu distribution so duplicate applications may be installed if you install more than one UI this way.

As for 'which Ubuntu version to get', just get 12.04 Desktop x64. The server version doesn't come with a UI by default (although it can be installed) and the 'alternative' versions just have a more indepth installation process.

If your desktop is reasonably powerful you can load up Ubuntu in VMWare Player, it virtualizes very nicely.
August 4, 2012 1:43:01 AM

I've got one running in VB to see how it works and such it's pretty decent. But, after trying to install desktop and finally realizing Why some of the errors came up I decided to use an extra windows disc i had here. apparently they don't play well with nvidia graphics. I kept getting a message before and or sometimes after the login screen. sometimes it would go away sometimes it wouldn't. Then if i installed the drivers it would just not even load the desktop. Was a bit annoying and too much hassle for a Fun build.
UGH, now Scvhost has attacked windows. A new fresh install -.-
a b B Homebuilt system
August 4, 2012 1:50:25 AM

gamerxavier said:
I've got one running in VB to see how it works and such it's pretty decent. But, after trying to install desktop and finally realizing Why some of the errors came up I decided to use an extra windows disc i had here. apparently they don't play well with nvidia graphics. I kept getting a message before and or sometimes after the login screen. sometimes it would go away sometimes it wouldn't. Then if i installed the drivers it would just not even load the desktop. Was a bit annoying and too much hassle for a Fun build.
UGH, now Scvhost has attacked windows. A new fresh install -.-


Gah, don't use VirtualBox, it's a mess. Use VMWare Player if you want a free solution
August 4, 2012 1:58:07 AM

o.0 virtual box always seems fine to me. least haven't had any issue so far.
a b B Homebuilt system
August 4, 2012 2:25:43 AM

gamerxavier said:
o.0 virtual box always seems fine to me. least haven't had any issue so far.


The virtual graphics in VMWare Workstation / VMWare Player are much better than in Virtualbox

EDIT: The VMWare Workstation Tech Preview is free to use until October
August 4, 2012 5:33:35 AM

good to know. I never really cared much about graphics for the VB since i just test stuff on it but i'll keep noted.
!