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100C temps?

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December 19, 2012 12:27:17 AM

My i5-3750K is getting really hot, apparently. At idle it sits around 35-40C, but according to RealTemp and Core Temp under full load it jumps up to 100-105C (during Prime95 stress test). When I installed everything I used Arctic Silver paste (squeezed out a blob in the middle of the CPU), got an aftermarket heatsink, and it just seems odd.


Mobo: ASRock Extreme3
GPU: GeForce GTX 465 SC
CPU: Ivy Bridge i5-3750K @ 3.4GHz (3.8Ghz Turbo)
RAM: 8GB DDR3 1600MHZ G.Skill Ripjaws

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December 19, 2012 12:28:43 AM

Describe this blob.....a pea sized blob or a thick amount that is way too much?
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December 19, 2012 12:32:43 AM

Perhaps two peas.

I don't remember putting that much stuff on there, plus I still have a majority of it in the tube.
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December 19, 2012 12:34:35 AM

Have you altered any of the voltage settings? In addition, which cooler did you install? To also add, did you install it correctly?

Lastly, how is the airflow in your case? Did you install the CPU fan the right way?
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December 19, 2012 12:34:51 AM

Hi :) 

Re-cement it...you got it wrong...

All the best Brett :) 
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December 19, 2012 12:36:10 AM

+1^ try that as well, this time put one small pea sized amount on the cpu surface and let the cooler itself spread it out. Too much thermal paste can result in bad performance.
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December 19, 2012 12:36:16 AM

KinetixHD said:
Perhaps two peas.

I don't remember putting that much stuff on there, plus I still have a majority of it in the tube.


Hi :) 

As well tell our customers in my shops when they buy those tubes.... there is enough for at LEAST 20 cpus in it...there SHOULD be a LOT more left than the MAJORITY... :( 

All the best Brett :) 
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December 19, 2012 12:42:20 AM

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

I was playing around with the overclocking, but I've since reset the BIOS.

The fan is working nicely with the other fans (1 case fan, PSU fan, GPU fan), but the case itself is a bit cramped. Isn't the fact that it's jumping from 35C to 100C in 10 or 15 seconds weird? Keep in mind I've been oblivious to this fact and have played 5 straight hours of Far Cry 3 without my computer shutting down or showing any signs of harm, so it doesn't really make sense to me. Could the sensors be damaged?
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December 19, 2012 12:45:44 AM

Did you make sure it is installed correctly? That cooler is not really a great one but it should do better than the stock obviously...now try to remove the CMOS battery from the motherboard and put it back in after a minute. You may not have reset the bios correctly.
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December 19, 2012 12:53:05 AM

Yeah, it was a pain in the ass to get in there due to the size and those flimsy bracket push-in locks but eventually it all fit into place correctly. And this was happening even before I was overclocking things in the bios.
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December 19, 2012 1:08:31 AM

Have you re-done the thermal paste?
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a b à CPUs
December 19, 2012 1:23:45 AM

If you're idling at 40C or higher; you've either got the voltage pumping to that chip something fierce or the thermal conductivity from the CPU to the HSF is bad (thermal paste)

First thing to do is go into the BIOS and look under the hardware monitor and come back and tell us what the voltage is. If it's over 1.25v there's a serious problem and it's time to really reset the bios and get that voltage down as at load it may be spiking enough to pop that chip and that makes for an expensive little silicon based paperweight.

Second, if the voltages are normal, you need to reapply the thermal paste! MOST IMPORTANTLY, clean the CPU and the HSF off with isopropyl alcohol 70% or higher and apply it correctly...

Methodology of applying thermal paste...

Step 1 : Clean the CPU and HSF with isopropyl alcohol

Step 2 : Put a small dab onto CPU

Step 3 : Press HSF onto CPU and twist about 20* each way while applying pressure.

Step 4 : Remove HSF from CPU and check for proper coverage/spill over. The idea is to get as much of that CPU covered as possible without it going over. If you don't have at LEAST 90%-95% of that CPU covered with thermal paste or there is a lot that ran off the side of the CPU, go to Step 1 and repeat the process. If you got a good spread with little or no waste over the side and a very good spread with maybe only a smidgen of the corners untouched, then go to Step 5. Anything else than that, go back to Step 1.

Step 5 : Clean the CPU and HSF with isopropyl alcohol. Repeat the method that achieved excellent coverage. DO NOT PULL THE HSF OFF OF THE CPU. If you know you had a good application and you repeated the steps properly, do NOT remove the HSF. You need to keep the HSF on the CPU without moving it other than slight rotations and bolt/fasten the HSF down.

Step 6 : Awesome Temperatures? If no, Step 1 again.

It's a process just like a programmer would make. Trial and error until you find the exact amount for your HSF/CPU/TIM combination. What I use with MX-2 and MX-4 is about 3/4 of what I had to use with Artic Silver 5. So each TIM is different.

Try this out and then let's see those temperatures.

Explanation for the fast 30C to 100C temperature change... The CPU itself will heat up in a matter of seconds. It's left to the HSF to draw that heat out of the CPU as fast as it can. That's where the TIM comes into play. If you just touch metal to metal, you have to hope for heats version of osmosis to take place which the CPU would fry before it actually managed to draw the heat. The thermal paste on the other hand can increase this draw by an exponential amount. The biggest thing here is if there's too little, it can't work properly. If there's too much it can actually act as an insulation. The object of the TIM is to make the HSF and CPU basically become one giant chunk of metal which allows the transfer of heat from the CPU to HSF instantaneously. However, it's not a perfect science and cheap TIM won't perform as good as something like IC Diamond. But without it, it's almost as bad as running with no HSF at all.

I hope this helps out! :) 
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December 19, 2012 2:34:19 AM

Before I go through the extreme hassle of fighting this monster heatsink which might prove unnecessary, I just gotta say...

I played 5+ hours of straight Far Cry 3, and if my CPU was under load like it is with Prime95 it would have been running at 100-105C (according to Real Temp/Core Temp) for that entire time. Is that even possible?


SpeedFan is a bit off from the other two. Where Core Temp shows a 104C, SpeedFan shows a 54C/57C under full load.
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December 19, 2012 3:10:15 AM

socialfox said:
Describe this blob.....a pea sized blob or a thick amount that is way too much?


i dont know if you eat different peas but a pea size ammount is tooooooo much. its more like a BB size drop.


KinetixHD said:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

I was playing around with the overclocking, but I've since reset the BIOS.

The fan is working nicely with the other fans (1 case fan, PSU fan, GPU fan), but the case itself is a bit cramped. Isn't the fact that it's jumping from 35C to 100C in 10 or 15 seconds weird? Keep in mind I've been oblivious to this fact and have played 5 straight hours of Far Cry 3 without my computer shutting down or showing any signs of harm, so it doesn't really make sense to me. Could the sensors be damaged?


those temps are not ideal and i would not recommend running at those temps but at that temp and the amount of time you ran it you didnt even begin to do damage. the laptop cpus are the same chips essentially and run in the 90s for as long as you want.

KinetixHD said:
Before I go through the extreme hassle of fighting this monster heatsink which might prove unnecessary, I just gotta say...

I played 5+ hours of straight Far Cry 3, and if my CPU was under load like it is with Prime95 it would have been running at 100-105C (according to Real Temp/Core Temp) for that entire time. Is that even possible?


SpeedFan is a bit off from the other two. Where Core Temp shows a 104C, SpeedFan shows a 54C/57C under full load.


speedfan is typically assumed to be inaccurate.
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December 19, 2012 3:52:10 AM

Rice grain method ftw. :D 
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December 19, 2012 5:02:58 AM

Alright, I took out the aftermarket heatsink, applied a new small dab of Arctic, put in the stock Intel one, and things are running much cooler. 27C when idle, 58C under load with Prime95. Thanks for pushing me to do it, guys. :p 

Will there be any lasting damage from it having run so hot for about a week or so?
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December 19, 2012 9:34:29 AM

2717938,14,787688 said:
i dont know if you eat different peas but a pea size ammount is tooooooo much. its more like a BB size drop.

Pea sized amount :p 


Anyways how long have you run the processor with those temperatures? Regardless I know processors shut themselves down before they get damaged with temperatures.

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December 19, 2012 7:47:10 PM

Newer processors will shut down. Actually his Ivy bridge will throttle back at a certain point and become close to useless if it gets too hot. Eventually it will just shut off and halt itself.

Either way that's a great set of temperatures for a stock heatsink/fan. If you have a decent aftermarket cooler, I'd try redoing the thermal paste on it and see the temperatures there. It's worth a shot you know?

As for damaging the processor? Heat "can" shrink the die over time which always happens even if you don't want it. However that theory doesn't always hold true to life as where one CPU that's running at 50C it's life might not outlast the same type of CPU that runs at 80C during its lifespan. As for what you did, you may have taken an additional day or two off it's overall life but you probably won't see that CPU die before you throw it away/pass it down. High voltages are more of a CPU killer than heat is anymore; especially with all the thermal protection of the chips.
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December 19, 2012 8:12:18 PM

Best answer selected by KinetixHD.
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