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Parts Compatibility on Gaming PC

Hello,
I am building my first pc. I am going to use it for gaming, graphics design, and animation.
What I am wondering is whether all of these parts are completely compatible.
Also if you have any suggestions, tricks, or tips that will help when building it.
Here are the parts list so far:

-- Asus VE228H 21.5-Inch Full-HD LED Monitor with Integrated Speakers

-- Cooler Master Storm Enforcer USB 3.0 Mid Tower ATX Case

-- ASUS Deluxe Intel Z77 ATX DDR3 2600 LGA 1155 Motherboard P8Z77-V DELUXE

-- Intel Core i5-3570K Quad-Core Processor

-- Corsair Vengeance Blue 16 GB DDR3 SDRAM Dual Channel Memory

-- Kingston SSDNow mS100 32 GB mSATA Internal Solid State Drive

-- ASUS EAH6670/DIS/1GD5 Radeon HD 6670 GDDR5 1 GB Video Card

-- Western Digital 1 TB Caviar Blue SATA III 7200 RPM 32 MB Cache

-- OCZ ModXStream Pro 600W Modular High Performance Power Supply


Oh and I am probably going to be using Ubuntu 12.04 as my OS.

Thanks for the help,
Leinardo
6 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about parts compatibility gaming
  1. For gaming, you may run into issues with Ubuntu. So you might want to keep that in the back of your mind. Ubuntu is great, but in a sea of programs created for Windows, it can be unfriendly waters for us Linux fans.

    I would forget about the SSD unless you can afford at least a 128GB one. The most efficient way to make use of an SSD is by running it as a primary boot drive. Using a small one as a cache drive is kinda.... pointless, and between NTFS formatting and an OS you're going to use over half of a 32GB SSD.

    The video card is also extremely weak for gaming. Although for your productivity work, which is going to tend to be more CPU intensive than anything, its probably sufficient. Even so, its a very unbalanced layout with an i5-3570K.

    You're spending a fortune on the motherboard and you don't have to.

    This is a very competent, and might I add much cheaper mobo:
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813157293

    With the money you save there and dropping the useless SSD, that should give you a better budget for the video card. I would look at something like a 7850, or a GTX 560 TI, or 6950 in that price range. All are very decent upper mid level graphics cards. The 7850 being the best out of the 3. The 6950 falling in between the 560 TI and 7850.

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814102999
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814102987
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814500236
  2. nekulturny said:
    For gaming, you may run into issues with Ubuntu. So you might want to keep that in the back of your mind. Ubuntu is great, but in a sea of programs created for Windows, it can be unfriendly waters for us Linux fans.

    I would forget about the SSD unless you can afford at least a 128GB one. The most efficient way to make use of an SSD is by running it as a primary boot drive. Using a small one as a cache drive is kinda.... pointless, and between NTFS formatting and an OS you're going to use over half of a 32GB SSD.

    The video card is also extremely weak for gaming. Although for your productivity work, which is going to tend to be more CPU intensive than anything, its probably sufficient. Even so, its a very unbalanced layout with an i5-3570K.

    You're spending a fortune on the motherboard and you don't have to.

    This is a very competent, and might I add much cheaper mobo:
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813157293

    With the money you save there and dropping the useless SSD, that should give you a better budget for the video card. I would look at something like a 7850, or a GTX 560 TI, or 6950 in that price range. All are very decent upper mid level graphics cards. The 7850 being the best out of the 3. The 6950 falling in between the 560 TI and 7850.

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814102999
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814102987
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814500236



    Thanks for the suggestions. Here is what I changed:

    -- OCZ 128GB

    -- Sapphire Radeon HD 6950 2 GB DDR5


    Also the reason why I choose the motherboard that I did is because I liked the amount and types of ports it offers. If there is a cheaper option with the same amount and type of ports, please let me know! :)

    Thanks for the help,
    Leinardo
  3. You're welcome.

    As far as the Asus Deluxe, yes it does have a lot more USB 3.0 ports (the Asrock board I linked does have them, and about the same total USB ports, but most of them are 2.0 not 3.0), but I dunno, thats a lot of money to pay for those my friend. USB 3.0 is still not really that common yet. And 3.0 devices do work in 2.0 ports, they just run at 2.0 speeds.

    SATA, they both have the same amount of those. Theres not much point in the dual Gigabit lan the Asus deluxe has. E-SATA. I don't know anyone who has one of those.

    Up to you, but I just think you're spending way more for features you probably won't need.

    You could always add an additional USB hub into one of the 5.25 inch bays if you need it. A decent one would run about $50 US.
  4. Ok. Thanks for the help.

    I decided to use the ASUS Intel Z77 ATX DDR3 2400 LGA 1155 Motherboard P8Z77-V instead.

    It has very similar ports but a lot less expensive.

    So will all of these parts be compatible?
    And do I have a good enough power supply?


    Thanks for the help,
    Leinardo
  5. Best answer
    You're welcome.

    Yes they're all compatible. Yes the power supply is powerful enough in terms of wattage and amps, although OCZ would not be my first choice for a PSU. That being said, theres nothing glaringly wrong with it that I would feel an urgent need to pressure you into selecting another.
  6. Best answer selected by LeinardoSmith.
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