Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

First build need it for 3DS Max, UDK rendering, ZBrush and CS6 Suite

Tags:
  • New Build
  • Rendering
  • Systems
Last response: in Systems
Share
August 6, 2012 9:09:55 PM

Approximate Purchase Date: October 2012

Budget Range: £1500

System Usage from Most to Least Important: 3D rendering and sculpting, gaming

Are you buying a monitor: No



Parts to Upgrade: CPU, RAM, Motherboard, Casing, SSD, (Not sure what else I need please advise) **Re-using power supply = Termaltake Toughpower 700w **

Do you need to buy OS: Yes Windows 7

Preferred Website(s) for Parts: Scan.co.uk

Location: Newcastle-upon-Tyne, UK

Parts Preferences: Gigabyte motherboard, Intel CPU, Obsideon Casing

Overclocking: Maybe

SLI or Crossfire: Maybe

Your Monitor Resolution: 1440x900 and 1920x1080 (I have two monitors)

Additional Comments: Would prefer to keep the build as quiet as possible.

Primary Software
3DS Max 2013
ZBrush 3.5
UDK
Photoshop CS6
xNormal

Games
Skyrim
CIV 5
Steam Service

I currently have a 6 year old Compaq Presario holding on for dear life but as much as I try I am losing an uphill battle.

I am new to building from scratch so all advice is gladly welcome.

thank you for reading

More about : build 3ds max udk rendering zbrush cs6 suite

August 7, 2012 12:36:51 AM

Here's a start....

I used this site but chances are you can find it all on Scan. That case down below comes with a multi channel fan controller so you can control the fan speed along with a large 200mm side fan. Larger fan means more air at a slower RPM which all equals quiet.


http://www.aria.co.uk/Products/Components/Cases/Midi+To... £89.94 inc. VAT
Corsair Carbide 500R Black Midi Tower Gaming Case

http://www.dabs.com/products/asus-p9x79-pro-s2011-intel... £189.99
Asus P9X79 PRO S2011 Intel X79 DDR3 ATX

http://www.dabs.com/products/intel-core-i7-3820-3-6ghz-... £226.99
Intel Core i7-3820 3.6GHz LGA2011 10MB 130W

or...

http://www.dabs.com/products/intel-core-i7-3930k-3-20gh... £449.98
Intel Core i7-3930K 3.20GHz S2011 12MB

http://www.dabs.com/products/noctua-dual-radiator---fan... £69.99
Noctua Dual Radiator & Fan CPU Cooler Multi-Socket with PWM Fans (LGA2011 only)


http://www.dabs.com/products/g-skill-16gb--4-x-4gb--ddr... £79.99
G.Skill 16GB (4 x 4GB) DDR3 1600MHz DIMM CL9 Ripjaw Z

or...

http://www.dabs.com/products/g-skill-32gb--8-x-4gb--ddr... £159.58
G.Skill 32GB (8 x 4GB) DDR3 1600MHz DIMM CL9 Ripjaw Z

http://www.dabs.com/category/components-and-storage,gra... <----- GTX 670

http://www.dabs.com/products/samsung-128gb-830-series-s... £77.98
Samsung 128GB 830 Series SATA 6Gb/s 2.5" SSD Basic Kit

http://www.dabs.com/products/microsoft-windows-7-profes... £104.98
Microsoft Windows 7 Professional w/SP1 - Licence and media - 1 PC - OEM - DVD - 64-bit - English
August 7, 2012 12:56:32 AM

i honestly wouldnt hear any recommendations from anyone recommending a gaming gpu for this build. you NEED a WORKSTATION gpu. i would spend a good chunk of your budget on the gpu as it is the second most important part of this build.

also depending on how much rendering you do and the depth of you projects would determine if you need a quad or hexa core. what do you think you need?
August 7, 2012 9:07:40 AM

What Why_Me recommended was pretty fine, in my opinion, other than MAYBE the GPU... but the OP did list gaming as a secondary priority, so a gaming GPU makes sense. I also tend to not trust the G.Skill brand, but only because everything they make costs less than everything the brands that have been around since 'back-in-the-day' make... They may be perfectly trustworthy to the rest of the world.

I would suggest the Asus P9X79 WS over the Pro for your build, as it is designed to be used in workstation builds, but really any of the P9X79 boards is good. I have the P9X79 Deluxe in my i7-3930K build, and I love it.

As for your choice of GPU... Some programs utilize GPUs in different ways than other programs, so what you have to find out is how the programs you are going to be using want to use the GPU. 'Gaming' GPUs work better than the 'Workstation' GPUs if the program is heavy on CUDA processing. If the program isn't, then, generally, the Quadro line outperforms the GeForce line by leaps and bounds. The Quadro line has far better computational power when it comes to math that is more complicated. I think it has something to do with double-precision floating point math, but I could be wrong. If you were just using Adobe software, I would just recommend the GeForce cards. You may want to start with the gaming GPU to save money, and then start putting money back to add one of the Quadro line later. Those workstation GPUs can be far more expensive than the best of the gaming GPUs.

As for whether you need a 6-core processor... Do you care much about the quality of your video encodes? Will you actually be doing any video encoding on this box? When it comes to doing a video encode, the best quality comes from a pure software encode. A pure software encode does all of the work on the CPU. If you are ok with the quality of a GPU-assisted encoder, then it makes sense to get a decent CPU (maybe a new Ivy Bridge?) and one of the Geforce 670s or 680s, but if you want the quality of a software encoder, I would spend the money on the i7-3930K. It will trim a lot of time off of your encodes.

You may want to get a 6-core CPU just for the fact that maybe you do heavy multitasking. The Sandy Bridge-E chips also have a quad-channel memory controller, which would give you double the memory bandwidth of an Ivy Bridge chip using the same speed RAM. Memory bandwidth is very important to Adobe's software, so it stands to reason that other picture/video software may benefit from quad-channel RAM.

So I would suggest:
Core i7-3930K
Asus P9X79 WS
I second the Samsung 830 SSD recommendation. I will get one of those as soon as I can put back the money. You'll probably also want a large hard drive to store data, since SSDs are either too small or too expensive... maybe one of Western Digital's Caviar Black series (they have a 5-year warranty) 7200rpm drives (I don't see any reason to worry about the 10k rpm drives if you have an SSD already). I just ordered some Mushkin Redline DDR3 1866MHz RAM for my system. I chose the 32GB kit (8GBx4) because I am running a bunch of virtual machines on my system, but a 16GB (4GBx4) kit would probably be enough for you if you're not working with ginormous texture files. As for a case, I can't really make a recommendation. I have a Cooler Master Storm Scout because at the time I was interested in being able to carry my PC about by the handle.
I will also second the recommendation of Windows 7 Pro x64. Pro and Ultimate both support up to 192GB of RAM, but I believe Microsoft artificially limits Home Premium to 16GB max.
August 8, 2012 2:25:07 PM

I first off want to thank you all for taking the time to suggest components for my build and your reasons behind them.

Why_Me: Thank you for the list it definitely points me in the right direction and I do not mind where I get the components from just as long as they are covered by a warranty and are the best to suit my needs.

cbrunnem: I will be mostly building large 3D environments in Max, moving them over to UDK and rendering using Mental Ray. All my environments built depending on my current project at the time. I am Games Designer and I use my primary software list the most so I need these software packages to their optimum level. As for the GPU what do you advise?

N0BOX: Awesome reply btw, I have not heard of G.Skill, how reliable are their components? I will need a motherboard that can support the Ivy Bridge chipset doe the P9X79 Deluxe? I will look into the Quadro line of GPUs they sound brilliant for what I need. Thank you for the CPU suggestion, as far as I know I will not be doing video encoding so this is not a priority. Thank you for the Windows 7 version suggestion, saved me alot of time trying to get the right one. Thank you again for your expertises.



I do have a small list of components I am already interested in if that helps:

Case: Corsair Obsidian 550D. Is this a good enough case for what I want to do?

GPU: I have a Palit GTX Sonic 460 series at this time but I am not sure if this will be enough, suggestions?

CPU: I would like to either i7 Sandybridge or, if possible get i7 Ivy Bridge. I think Ivy Bridge would be worth the extra money but again please crit.

PSU: I already have a Thermaltake Toughpower 700w power supply, will this be large enough?

HD: I have recently purchased a 10000rpm Samsung 1TB HD from scan which I will be installing as well. I do need an SSD to run my programs off but again I do not know what size drive I need.
August 8, 2012 5:30:56 PM

whitelyt said:

N0BOX: Awesome reply btw, I have not heard of G.Skill, how reliable are their components? I will need a motherboard that can support the Ivy Bridge chipset doe the P9X79 Deluxe? I will look into the Quadro line of GPUs they sound brilliant for what I need. Thank you for the CPU suggestion, as far as I know I will not be doing video encoding so this is not a priority. Thank you for the Windows 7 version suggestion, saved me alot of time trying to get the right one. Thank you again for your expertises.

Case: Corsair Obsidian 550D. Is this a good enough case for what I want to do?

GPU: I have a Palit GTX Sonic 460 series at this time but I am not sure if this will be enough, suggestions?

CPU: I would like to either i7 Sandybridge or, if possible get i7 Ivy Bridge. I think Ivy Bridge would be worth the extra money but again please crit.

PSU: I already have a Thermaltake Toughpower 700w power supply, will this be large enough?

HD: I have recently purchased a 10000rpm Samsung 1TB HD from scan which I will be installing as well. I do need an SSD to run my programs off but again I do not know what size drive I need.


I don't know anything at all about G.Skill, which is why I tend to pay more for Patriot or Mushkin. Lots of people buy G.Skill RAM every day, and I haven't seen a lot of bad reviews on newegg.com (where I shop here in the states). I just worry a lot when I run into something that costs a lot less than everything else.

The i7-3930K is a different processor line altogether from the 2600K or the 3770K. It is a Sandy Bridge-E, which is the 'Enthusiast' version of the Sandy Bridge line. Rather than double-channel memory like the regular Sandy Bridge and Ivy Bridge lines, it uses quad-channel. Where the Ivy Bridge line has something like 16 or 20 PCIE 2.0 lanes, it has 40. Unfortunately they are not compatible with the regular Sandy and Ivy Bridge lines. They are LGA 2011, where the regular lines are LGA 1155. In the future, Intel will be coming out with the Ivy Bridge-E series, which will also be LGA 2011, and the current P9X79 motherboards will be able to support those chips and PCIE 3.0. Intel is supposed to release the Ivy Bridge-E series at the same time as their next line of regular chips (code named Haswell).

A lot of people seem to like picking that case in their builds. As far as I know, it should be compatible with everything. The only thing to consider if you were to chose a Sandy Bridge-E processor is that they do not come with a stock CPU cooler. Most people pick up a rather large heatsink/fan so that they can get a decent overclock on their new chip (which is a fantastic choice for an overclocker), so you'd want to be sure that there is plenty of clearance in the case to make room for it.

I assume that GPU is an Nvidia GTX 460? I've never heard of the Palit brand. The Quadro line of GPUs would be quite an upgrade, given what software you are using, but the GTX 460 would be much better for gaming than a Quadro GPU. You might consider keeping the GTX 460 for use with CUDA processing and gaming, and buying a Quadro for use with your 3D software.

That PSU is probably big enough to handle everything, because you wouldn't be running a Quadro and your GTX 460 at the same time (they would have completely different uses). You might consider upgrading to a slightly larger PSU that is made by Seasonic (including XFX and some Corsair PSUs). They make higher-quality PSUs according to a lot of people here on the forums, and you want something high quality if you are investing a lot of money in your new system.

I would figure that a 240GB-256GB SSD would be big enough for most people with a normal collection of games. 120GB is just a tiny bit too small for me. I have a 90GB steam directory, and then I add a collection of Adobe software and Windows 7 Ultimate to break the limit. I'd recommend a Samsung 830 series 256GB ssd for you.

The Ivy Bridge line has some quirks you should know about. They upgraded their transistor process to a '3D' transistor, which packs more transistor logic into a smaller space. That means that the heat of a Sandy Bridge processor is now concentrated into a smaller space. Now, the Ivy Bridge line requires less power than the Sandy Bridge line, which means that for the same amount of processor power you use much less power. The only problem with this situation is that if you want to do any overclocking, you have a more 'extra heat' in a smaller space. It becomes very hard to overclock the Ivy Bridge line past 4.5GHz, where you can push the Sandy Bridge line high enough to beat the equivalent Ivy Bridge chips. You lose out on power efficiency, but you get better price-vs-power out of the Sandy Bridge line. The Sandy Bridge-E line is a completely different story. There is nothing out there that can really compete with SB-E, and you can overclock the SB-E chips to some ridiculous speeds if you know what you are doing, but they just suck power and blow off tons of heat. You wouldn't expect to win any efficiency contests with SB-E, but that's the price you pay for having half-again or more the CPU power of anything else out there (assuming the program you are using is multi-threaded).

I would suggest reading the Tom's Hardware reviews of the Sandy Bridge-E chips (i7-3960X, i7-3930K, i7-3820) and the Ivy Bridge chips before making a decision. For most people the IB line is all they need, but for some people, the extra power of the SB-E line really makes sense. It all depends on how hard you push your computer, and for how long you are pushing it that hard.
August 8, 2012 10:05:20 PM

N0BOX: Sorry that I misunderstood you, as for your information thank you again.

From your information I believe it would be a good idea to invest in the SB-E and the P9X79 board. I read up on the corsair Obsidian 550D case and it seemed like a smart choice (mainly the sound reduction interior and the cheaper price when compared to the 800 series).

For the heat sink and fan I was looking at the corsair H60, H70, H80 but again I am inexperienced and wanted some advice on this matter as well.

I will have to look into the Quadro GPUs, any suggestions?

As for a PSU I found on the XFX site the ProSeries 850W PSU, would this be powerful enough?

I agree entirely about the SSD, a 240GB SSD should be big enough for myself. I cannot see myself exceeding this amount.

Thank you again
August 9, 2012 4:48:19 AM

whitelyt said:
N0BOX: Sorry that I misunderstood you, as for your information thank you again.

From your information I believe it would be a good idea to invest in the SB-E and the P9X79 board. I read up on the corsair Obsidian 550D case and it seemed like a smart choice (mainly the sound reduction interior and the cheaper price when compared to the 800 series).

For the heat sink and fan I was looking at the corsair H60, H70, H80 but again I am inexperienced and wanted some advice on this matter as well.

I will have to look into the Quadro GPUs, any suggestions?

As for a PSU I found on the XFX site the ProSeries 850W PSU, would this be powerful enough?

I agree entirely about the SSD, a 240GB SSD should be big enough for myself. I cannot see myself exceeding this amount.

Thank you again


Ahh, yes, watercooling would be an excellent choice, especially if you are planning on doing any overclocking in the future. Another great thing about using a CPU water block is that it gets rid of the need for such a huge heatsink and fan(s) hovering over top of some of the DIMM slots. If you have a water block, you can get whatever type of RAM you want without having to worry about whether the CPU heatsink is in the way. You can also, obviously, get better overclocking performance out of liquid cooling. When I posted here regarding my X79 build, it was suggested that I get the H100, but the H100 requires 240mm by 120mm by probably more than 50mm of space inside of your case to house the radiator and fans. The H80 is probably the next best choice.

I honestly don't know anything about the Quadro line of GPUs. I would just buy the most expensive one that I could afford. You could get by on CPU power and a gaming GPU for the time being, assuming you aren't trying to do time-sensitive, professional work, all while saving up for one of the Quadros.

I think the basic rules for PSUs is 600w for one of these power-hungry CPUs and one good high-power gaming GPU. Jump to 750w if you are running two GPUs in SLI/Crossfire. If you have a bunch of hard drives, add wattage as needed. I think that XFX PSU you chose would be plenty. I'm not totally sure what the power requirements are for the Quadro GPUs, but I doubt that they use any more than the best gaming GPUs. Since you won't likely be using your gaming GPU at the same time as the Quadro, I don't think you would have to worry about the combined power requirements of both GPUs.

When I upgrade my PSU, I will likely end up with one much larger than I really need just so I can get an 80+ Platinum rated power supply. I want to try to limit the amount of wasted power generated by my computer because I'm tired of sitting in a hot room in the summer. :) 
!