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SLI Connectors. What are they and how do they work?

Last response: in Graphics & Displays
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June 16, 2012 8:47:40 PM

Hi.
I just had few questions regarding the SLI connector I'm willing to buy to add a 640GT to my current 250GT graphics card.
Now I did my homework and researched this subject in many different occasions, but it is now that I am the most interested in buying such thing. I am really confused whether I want to buy the 670GTX because of its massive power and multi-view capability, or the 640GT as it offers the multi-view feature that I am seeking most but lacks the graphical power of a 670. So I said why not merge these 2 graphics card because I know the 250GT I currently have is still kicking pretty good for my needs, but not as much as I want it to be.

So I liked to ask the knowledgeable community here and maybe I can get some help.

You see, I read somewhere that an SLI connector can make 1 graphics do all the graphical computing while the other offers the PhysX computing for games, and me, as a graphics designer and a gamer, likes to have as much power in his arsenal... but you know, I hate being broke too. So I wanted to ask specific questions that I couldn't find the answers to while I was Googling SLI connectors. So here we go:

1. I'm no engineer but isn't applying just the PhysX computing on 1 card is a waste of power for any game? I mean as of right now I can play Battlefield 3 on a solid 40FPS with my 250GT, but I'm wondering how exactly will that change for gaming, if that thing I read about PhysX being applied to one card and the graphical computing on the next, what card should I make my primary and why? Is that fact even true or false? Is it really worth it getting 2 cards to power up 1 game, or will the game not take full advantage of both of them and I won't get a significant FPS boost?

2. How will having 2 cards affect my graphics designing. I work in After Effects and 3Ds Max most of my time and I find that CUDA cores help significantly in such field, my question is, will the 2 cards combine their power to render my stuff or again, will there be waste of power because of how the programs work?

3. Is there a real overall significant boost in performance for general graphical computing purposes? If I were to buy a new 670GTX, will that match the power of a 640GT and a 250GT combined with an SLI connector or be greater?

The 2 options remaining at this time is that I could buy the 640GT and SLI connect that ho to the 250GT and have multi-view shiat, or I can just buy the 670GTX and have all of that but maybe with little more power and sell my current PC even though I know I won't get much money from doing that. What options is best for performance and what option is better for my pocket?

Thanks.

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a c 271 U Graphics card
June 16, 2012 8:51:39 PM

You cannot run a 640GT and a 250GT in SLi, the GPU's need to be the same.
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a b U Graphics card
June 16, 2012 8:55:37 PM

To SLi a 250GT you need another 250GT. Sell the 250GT and get a GTX670, that would be the best option. What is the make and model of your powersupply?
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a b U Graphics card
June 16, 2012 9:10:20 PM

Like everyone else has said, both cards need to have the same GPU. eg. GTX 680 will only work with GTX 680. Plus I don't think the GT 640 even has SLI fingers.

1. PhysX only works in games that are PhysX enabled. Getting a card that is too slow for PhysX and one that is fast will result in a bottleneck. Watch this: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cbww3dhzK0M

2. Yes the additional number of CUDA cores will definitely help. One new generation card however, has more CUDA cores than two previous generation card. GTX 670 and above.

3. The GTX 670 is better than the two cards suggested combined, even if they could be put in SLI. Featuring 1344 CUDA cores, it can run any game on MAX settings with great framerates. Around 60.

One last thing, and SLI connector connects to the top of the cards. Check this out: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scalable_Link_Interface

Hope this helped!
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June 17, 2012 11:19:33 AM

Thanks all for the responses. I think I'll buy the 670GTX then :]
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June 17, 2012 11:20:02 AM

Best answer selected by XYMan.
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June 17, 2012 11:23:06 AM

stickg1 said:
To SLi a 250GT you need another 250GT. Sell the 250GT and get a GTX670, that would be the best option. What is the make and model of your powersupply?


It's a 550W NZXT PSU that came with the case. But either way it looks like I'm going to buy the 670GTX after everybody's responses, I mean I don't know if I can sell this PC now but I'll try.
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a c 271 U Graphics card
June 17, 2012 11:24:56 AM

This topic has been closed by Mousemonkey
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