Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Good CPU cooler for i5-3570?

Last response: in CPUs
Share
a b à CPUs
December 22, 2012 6:45:16 PM

Hello Guys, I made a post not long ago which was a bit confusing. So I try again.

My temperatures during load rises close to the thermal temperature with stock cooler. So what I need is a good CPU cooler. Nothing overkill, it's not the k-version of i5-3570.

I would like a CPU cooler which is about just as easy to install as the stock cooler. I'm a goofy guy, so it's not smart giving some thermal paste in my hands, I would most likely spread that paste all over the computer before I even open the CPU cooler box. So I don't want to hear about any CoolerMaster 212 EVO! It' great - I know, but I would like a quick and easy install as mentioned.

Thanks in advance! :bounce: 

More about : good cpu cooler 3570

a b à CPUs
December 22, 2012 7:02:37 PM

CPU coolers that are excellent for cooling are harder to install than a stock Intel cooler friend, and thermal paste isn't that hard - just get the Hyper 212, its pretty easy for what it is, it doesn't get easier than that unless you wanna just replace the stock cooler with a stock cooler. Just take it off, clean the CPU with alcohol, rub it with a microfiber cleaning cloth, put a tiny thin line of thermal paste down, back plate beneath the motherboard, and the mount & screw down the Hyper 212. Its easy, really, its nothing challenging.
a b à CPUs
December 22, 2012 7:44:56 PM

payturr said:
CPU coolers that are excellent for cooling are harder to install than a stock Intel cooler friend, and thermal paste isn't that hard - just get the Hyper 212, its pretty easy for what it is, it doesn't get easier than that unless you wanna just replace the stock cooler with a stock cooler. Just take it off, clean the CPU with alcohol, rub it with a microfiber cleaning cloth, put a tiny thin line of thermal paste down, back plate beneath the motherboard, and the mount & screw down the Hyper 212. Its easy, really, its nothing challenging.


As I said, I won't be getting such a cooler.

I done some research meanwhile and this seems as a worthy consideration

http://www.coolermaster.com/product.php?product_id=6698

What do you think?
Related resources
a b à CPUs
December 22, 2012 7:59:17 PM

lostgamer_03 said:
As I said, I won't be getting such a cooler.

I done some research meanwhile and this seems as a worthy consideration

http://www.coolermaster.com/product.php?product_id=6698

What do you think?

It doesn't have a lot of fins, but it does have copper.
Eh. I guess.
a b à CPUs
December 22, 2012 8:33:06 PM

So, it seems like you want a low profile downdraft cooler from what you are saying right?
a b à CPUs
December 22, 2012 8:42:40 PM

combine1237 said:
So, it seems like you want a low profile downdraft cooler from what you are saying right?


I want a CPU cooler which is easy to install. A CPU cooler with a push-pin design. :) 
a b à CPUs
December 22, 2012 8:50:21 PM

lostgamer_03 said:
I want a CPU cooler which is easy to install. A CPU cooler with a push-pin design. :) 


Was a little confused thanks for clarifying, but why would you want a push pin, I felt like I was going to break my motherboard when I was putting my stock one on.
a c 76 à CPUs
December 22, 2012 8:59:45 PM

push pin design? that's absolutely coolermaster tx3

i know deepcool is rare in USA, but the best you can get is Deep Cool Gammaxx 300. believe me, i own both EVO and gammax 300. the performs almost the same without overclocking
a b à CPUs
December 22, 2012 9:10:39 PM

AMD Radeon said:
push pin design? that's absolutely coolermaster tx3

i know deepcool is rare in USA, but the best you can get is Deep Cool Gammaxx 300. believe me, i own both EVO and gammax 300. the performs almost the same without overclocking


Is it more common in Europe? Living in Denmark. :) 
December 22, 2012 10:36:30 PM

Since it's not overclock capable I'd just use the Stock, the stock will keep it cool at stock temps/turbo/load temps just fine,
a b à CPUs
December 23, 2012 10:32:33 AM

darksparten said:
Since it's not overclock capable I'd just use the Stock, the stock will keep it cool at stock temps/turbo/load temps just fine,


If it made my CPU run cool then I wouldn't have made this post. :) 
a c 116 à CPUs
December 23, 2012 11:07:25 AM

lostgamer_03 said:
If it made my CPU run cool then I wouldn't have made this post. :) 

Cool is relative. As far as Intel's thermal design goes, 70C core temperature under normal active use is still 'cool', a whole 35 degrees below the thermal ceiling.

As far as push-pins are concerned, I know Intel's HSF seem to be designed to fail after 3-4 years. Practically everyone I know who has had a Core2Duo for more 4+ years has had to replace their HSF due to their CPUs hitting core temps over 80C and getting thermal throttling even at stock clocks. Some with first-gen i5/i7 are also starting to run in the same problem.

Personally, whenever I replace a push-pin HSF, I pick something with spring-loaded screwed-in clips like the 212 +/EVO to take the plastic out of the equation. It may take 45mins longer to install if you have to take the PC apart to do so but at least you know you won't ever have to do it again.
a b à CPUs
December 23, 2012 11:17:24 AM

Why doesn't anyone know anything but that stupid 212 EVO? I clearly said in the thread that I don't even want to hear about it. It's a no go.
a c 116 à CPUs
December 23, 2012 11:43:52 AM

lostgamer_03 said:
Why doesn't anyone know anything but that stupid 212 EVO? I clearly said in the thread that I don't even want to hear about it. It's a no go.

You said it was a "no-go" because you want something with push-pins.

I said I don't trust push-pins and would strongly recommend something *** LIKE *** the 212 +/EVO to avoid having to worry about plastic push-pins failing over time as they seem to systematically do with Intel's stock HSF.

Spending the 45-60mins to install a HSF with backplate will spare you hours of frustration and trying to troubleshoot your PC 3-4 years down the road when the push-pins start failing.
a b à CPUs
December 23, 2012 12:44:28 PM

InvalidError said:
You said it was a "no-go" because you want something with push-pins.

I said I don't trust push-pins and would strongly recommend something *** LIKE *** the 212 +/EVO to avoid having to worry about plastic push-pins failing over time as they seem to systematically do with Intel's stock HSF.

Spending the 45-60mins to install a HSF with backplate will spare you hours of frustration and trying to troubleshoot your PC 3-4 years down the road when the push-pins start failing.


Most push-pin design coolers promise on average 40000 hours of usage. Which is 1666,66667 days - in years it's 4,56621. So I expect it to last longer.

I will most likely upgrade my CPU in 3-4 years so if you're right then I would have no problems either.

Still I would like a better cooler, but it seems as if no one have any better advice than 212 EVO, which is soooo overkill for my non-overclockable CPU.
a c 116 à CPUs
December 23, 2012 1:17:44 PM

lostgamer_03 said:
Still I would like a better cooler, but it seems as if no one have any better advice than 212 EVO, which is soooo overkill for my non-overclockable CPU.

As I implied in my original reply, 70C core temperature is still cool enough as far as Intel's warranty is concerned and will easily allow the CPU to last the ~4 years you want it to last (assuming the pins don't loosen up prematurely) so you can simply stick to stock HSF.

The 40000h rating is on the fan electronics and bearings. The plastic itself may not necessarily maintain the necessary rigidity and tolerances to apply sufficient contact force that long. Also, the plastic is bearing this force regardless of whether the PC is on or off. A fan with infinite lifespan is worthless if the heatsink no longer makes adequate contact with the CPU at some point during the third year.

I use the stock HSF on my i5-3470 and get 60-65C under gaming and other typical active use. I plan to leave it there until I start hearing it spin like crazy (first clue that the pins are loosening) and then I'll replace it with a 212EVO or equivalent. Same thing I did with my Core2Duo.
a b à CPUs
December 23, 2012 2:21:35 PM

InvalidError said:
As I implied in my original reply, 70C core temperature is still cool enough as far as Intel's warranty is concerned and will easily allow the CPU to last the ~4 years you want it to last (assuming the pins don't loosen up prematurely) so you can simply stick to stock HSF.

The 40000h rating is on the fan electronics and bearings. The plastic itself may not necessarily maintain the necessary rigidity and tolerances to apply sufficient contact force that long. Also, the plastic is bearing this force regardless of whether the PC is on or off. A fan with infinite lifespan is worthless if the heatsink no longer makes adequate contact with the CPU at some point during the third year.

I use the stock HSF on my i5-3470 and get 60-65C under gaming and other typical active use. I plan to leave it there until I start hearing it spin like crazy (first clue that the pins are loosening) and then I'll replace it with a 212EVO or equivalent. Same thing I did with my Core2Duo.


And the 212 EVO might rust into nothing?

I just want some great advice about a good push-pin design CPU cooler that would cool a Little better than the stock-intel cooler? You can't provide any.
a c 76 à CPUs
December 26, 2012 7:41:29 AM

^ cmon, no one posting above lives in denmark...

please find one yourself in denmark one of these

Coolermaster TX3
DeepCool Gammaxx 300

there are some other cooler below this option, but they performs worse than stock.... you wouldnt want them

i know the option is limited. this is as far as we can help
!