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Good build for 2560x1440 gaming pc (Prefer the most future proof)?

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August 8, 2012 1:48:14 AM

Approximate Purchase Date: Likely by the end of September

Budget Range: ~$2000 (Willing to budge a little) After Rebates

System Usage from Most to Least Important:Gaming, Surfing, Productivity, File Compression/Decompression, Folding

Parts Not Required: (Keyboard, mouse, speakers, OS, 8gb ram, 2tb in usb 3.0 drives) **Corsair TX 750**

Preferred Website(s) for Parts: (e.g.: newegg.com, amazon.com, ebay.com)

Country: USA

Parts Preferences: (Intel CPU, 2560x1440 monitor, Not Thermaltake)

Overclocking: Eventually

SLI or Crossfire: Eventually

Monitor Resolution: (e.g.: 2560x1440, 5760x1080, eventually 7680x1440)

Additional Comments: (Would prefer window on case but not necessary, Want to stay away from watercooling if at all possible (have heard horror stories).
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Case:NZXT Switch 810

CPU:i7-3930k

Cooling: Noctua NH-D14

Motherboard: ASRock X79 Extreme 4

GPU: Sapphire Vapor-X 7970

SSD: OCZ Agility 3 240gb SATA III

Monitor: Yamasaki Catleap 2703 2560x1440

Looking to run graphic intensive games such as: Heavily moded Skyrim, Metro 2033, Crysis 1&2, Max Payne 3 etc.

Am not looking to crossfire/sli or run multiple 2560x1440 monitors at the current budget. Am open to suggestions on any part of the build and will keep any parts in my current build if there is only marginal gains in others. Also would like to know if the monitors have a good success rate, I also have a HP 2711x 1080p monitor I will keep if there isn't a noticeable quality difference. Have Win 7 non OEM, not sure if this can carry over to another motherboard or not and how to do so.

Thanks for your time, I have posted before asking about various upgrades but have decided to essentially start over.



August 8, 2012 1:59:09 AM

just a friendly heads up on the 7970 ghz is that it has slightly limited overclocking features. so if you are going to overclock it, you cant push it too far. Though regardless, it's still one of the most friendly high resolution card for resolutions past 1920x1080
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August 8, 2012 2:04:06 AM

dudewitbow said:
just a friendly heads up on the 7970 ghz is that it has slightly limited overclocking features. so if you are going to overclock it, you cant push it too far. Though regardless, it's still one of the most friendly high resolution card for resolutions past 1920x1080


Thanks, is there a better option performance wise with more overclocking headroom?
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August 8, 2012 2:13:59 AM

Well sir If you want to spend a little more and get better performance get a 680 instead of a 7970. It is 30 more but gets better performance. It also uses a lot less power if you care about that.
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August 8, 2012 2:37:09 AM

lt_dan_zsu said:
Well sir If you want to spend a little more and get better performance get a 680 instead of a 7970. It is 30 more but gets better performance. It also uses a lot less power if you care about that.



actually, at this resolution, the 7970 ghz is the better card. even in games that favor nvidia like BF3. Like the 7970 ghz though, the turbo boost feature of the 680 also limits the amount of room the 680 can be overclocked.

to ops quote before: uhh at this price range, essentially if your willing to pay for the ghz model, go for it, it will still perform better than like a 7970 oc(since it has more room to overclock, but right now doesn't have the better PCB due to the ghz taking all the good pcbs atm). essentially, the 2 top end cards, the 680 and 7970 ghz can only go so far in overclocking, and at the most is only discouraged not to buy because the 7970 and 670 are moderately close to them, and can approach their speeds at a much more significant price difference. though there is a much bigger price gap between the 670 and 680 then there is 7970 to 7970 ghz so whatever choice you make is fine.
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August 8, 2012 2:51:04 AM

imo there is no reason to not fit 2 7970's into this build. that leaves you around 1100 dollars to build the rest. you can save money by ditching that hexacore that is worthless compared to an i5/i7 in gaming.
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August 8, 2012 3:49:35 AM

cbrunnem said:
imo there is no reason to not fit 2 7970's into this build. that leaves you around 1100 dollars to build the rest. you can save money by ditching that hexacore that is worthless compared to an i5/i7 in gaming.


Thanks, will the current power supply and motherboard (Asus P8Z68-V LE) work for a 7970 crossfire build? Also will this create a bottle neck with my pc? Thanks for the responses.
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Best solution

August 8, 2012 12:04:09 PM

Exile1993 said:
Thanks, will the current power supply and motherboard (Asus P8Z68-V LE) work for a 7970 crossfire build? Also will this create a bottle neck with my pc? Thanks for the responses.


absolutely that psu is big enough as long as you have 4 pcie connectors.

and a 2500k/3570k or a 2600k/3770k will not be bottleneck if overclocked a tad.
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August 8, 2012 12:18:24 PM

Ok thanks, do you know if a 3770k ivy bridge will show increased performance with pcie 3.0 in crossfire or not?
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August 8, 2012 12:24:46 PM

The i7 CPUs will not give you any performance boost at all vs the i5 CPUs.
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August 8, 2012 4:23:05 PM

That PSU should be more than enough even if you do OC.
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August 8, 2012 9:24:41 PM

Best answer selected by Exile1993.
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