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Going to China

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August 30, 2005 7:20:11 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

If you ask local officials, are you able to take photos of government
establishments or is it totally against the rules. Also will a radio shack
adapter work in China? I'm all excited and want to record as many photos as
possible and not run into any trouble. I know the cardinal rule is always
ask first. Just looking for any expierenced travellers.....


Thanks,
FAZ.

More about : china

Anonymous
August 30, 2005 7:44:00 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

The only places of which I'm aware there might be problems would be of
military sites, including airfield flight lines. If you get away from the
big cities, some airfields are joint use.

There are too many photogenic sites to worry too much about pictures of
government buildings -- there are some places where it may not be illegal to
take pictures, but would be rude. Examples -- I passed up a chance to take
pictures of a barber giving a haircut to a customer on the sidewalk of a
side street in Nanjing. Navy ships in Shanghai harbor, visible during the
river cruise tour, are off limits. Anything that might imply that you're
photographing something because it's outdated or inferior would be
discourteous, and just as in other places, many people may not want to be
included in your photos. If in doubt, ask.

Make sure you allow for lots of photos. Most of my travel has been with
film, and on a two week field trip I might use up 30-50 rolls of 36 exp
film.

Current adapters should work -- I was rarely in a location where electric
power was not available, even in remote parts of the countryside.

Where in China are you visiting?

Regards --

"Faz" <chuckfaz@shaw.ca> wrote in message
news:LfQQe.335608$s54.51273@pd7tw2no...
> If you ask local officials, are you able to take photos of government
> establishments or is it totally against the rules. Also will a radio shack
> adapter work in China? I'm all excited and want to record as many photos
> as possible and not run into any trouble. I know the cardinal rule is
> always ask first. Just looking for any expierenced travellers.....
>
>
> Thanks,
> FAZ.
>
August 30, 2005 9:45:54 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

I just got back from China.
Most hotels will gratis lend you a converter that is far more substantial
than what you carry with you to recharge batteries.
I carried Nikon and Sony digital cameras and had no problems.
One of the most unexpected realizations about life in China was the minimal
street level police presence. There are so many people everywhere that China
is almost anarchic at the street level; however apart from pickpockets
street crime/violence is just not a threat. The chaos that is normal
automobile traffic is a prime example- westerners are strongly discouraged
from even trying to drive, let alone cross the street. When you see it you
will know what I mean. Fortunately taxis are subsidized in the large cities
and it is amazingly inexpensive to take a taxi anywhere, as long as you have
where you want to go written in Chinese for you.
The Chinese are very anxious to impress westerners favorably and there are
no obvious restrictions on your activities there.
Unless you are at a specifically designated military site, which you will
not be, the truth is no one cares what you do in China. Rules about
photography, tripods and flash are rarely enforced even at most stage
venues. This can actually be annoying.
One of the more charming aspects about travelling in China is that as a
westerner, paricularly if you are caucasian or black, Chinese from outlying
provinces who happen to be visiting the same tourist site as you may ask to
speak with you, to practice English, or to have their picture taken with
you. Many people from outside the big cities have never laid eyes on a
westerner and may never again. They seemed especially interested in blondes
as well as people with black skin.
Photographing people on the street in China is no different than on the
streets of New York and similar courtesies should be extended.
One other thing you must be prepared for is the overwhelming air pollution
such that a blue sky can be a rare event in a Chinese city. If you use an
interchangeable lens dSLR the sensor will get dirt on it if you change
lenses outdoors. You should also have a skylight or similar filter on lenses
to protect them from the air. You cannot protect your lungs and eyes as
easily.
Related resources
August 30, 2005 11:33:15 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"World Traveler" <wt@earthlink.net> wrote in message
news:4CQQe.2180$4P5.319@newsread2.news.pas.earthlink.net...
> Make sure you allow for lots of photos. Most of my travel has been with
> film, and on a two week field trip I might use up 30-50 rolls of 36 exp
> film.
>

<gasp> Are you a millionaire or something!?!?! </gasp>




a
Anonymous
August 30, 2005 12:55:14 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Faz" <chuckfaz@shaw.ca> wrote in message
news:LfQQe.335608$s54.51273@pd7tw2no...
> If you ask local officials, are you able to take photos of government
> establishments or is it totally against the rules.

What government establishments?

You can't take pictures in airports or train stations.
You can't take pictures of military installations.

You can take pictures of most everything else (if you can't, there will be a
sign).

> Also will a radio shack
> adapter work in China?

What kind of adapter? Do you mean a charger for your camera? If it is dual
voltage, as almost all of them are, then, yes -- you just need a plug
adapter. RS sells them, but they're also easy to find in China.

> I'm all excited and want to record as many photos as
> possible and not run into any trouble. I know the cardinal rule is always
> ask first. Just looking for any expierenced travellers.....

I've been to China many, many times. As you say, the cardinal rule is "ask
first." China is very interested in developing tourism and, particularly
with respect to the more popular tourist destinations, you will find great
efforts made to accomodate travellers like yourself.

>
>
> Thanks,
> FAZ.
>
>
Anonymous
August 30, 2005 2:51:57 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

I've been to China several times over several years and have had no problems
whatsoever taking photos. I was, however, careful not to be blatant in
taking photos of military subjects.

"Faz" <chuckfaz@shaw.ca> wrote in message
news:LfQQe.335608$s54.51273@pd7tw2no...
> If you ask local officials, are you able to take photos of government
> establishments or is it totally against the rules. Also will a radio shack
> adapter work in China? I'm all excited and want to record as many photos
> as possible and not run into any trouble. I know the cardinal rule is
> always ask first. Just looking for any expierenced travellers.....
>
>
> Thanks,
> FAZ.
>
Anonymous
August 30, 2005 2:58:04 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

I forgot. Are you talking about an adapter to allow your plug to be
connected to their wall outlets or a converter to change voltage? Adapters
are readily available over there in department stores. Check your battery
charger's name plate to see what its input voltage requirements are. My
charger allows me to use from 100 to 240 input AC volts.

"World Traveler" <wt@earthlink.net> wrote in message
news:4CQQe.2180$4P5.319@newsread2.news.pas.earthlink.net...
> The only places of which I'm aware there might be problems would be of
> military sites, including airfield flight lines. If you get away from the
> big cities, some airfields are joint use.
>
> There are too many photogenic sites to worry too much about pictures of
> government buildings -- there are some places where it may not be illegal
> to take pictures, but would be rude. Examples -- I passed up a chance to
> take pictures of a barber giving a haircut to a customer on the sidewalk
> of a side street in Nanjing. Navy ships in Shanghai harbor, visible
> during the river cruise tour, are off limits. Anything that might imply
> that you're photographing something because it's outdated or inferior
> would be discourteous, and just as in other places, many people may not
> want to be included in your photos. If in doubt, ask.
>
> Make sure you allow for lots of photos. Most of my travel has been with
> film, and on a two week field trip I might use up 30-50 rolls of 36 exp
> film.
>
> Current adapters should work -- I was rarely in a location where electric
> power was not available, even in remote parts of the countryside.
>
> Where in China are you visiting?
>
> Regards --
>
> "Faz" <chuckfaz@shaw.ca> wrote in message
> news:LfQQe.335608$s54.51273@pd7tw2no...
>> If you ask local officials, are you able to take photos of government
>> establishments or is it totally against the rules. Also will a radio
>> shack adapter work in China? I'm all excited and want to record as many
>> photos as possible and not run into any trouble. I know the cardinal rule
>> is always ask first. Just looking for any expierenced travellers.....
>>
>>
>> Thanks,
>> FAZ.
>>
>
>
Anonymous
August 31, 2005 1:04:09 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

I've been there many times and the only places where photography isn't
allowed are a few temples (they prefer to sell you postcards) and most
Tibetans. Before you take picture of a Tibetan, be sure to ask their
permission. Some will allow their picture to be taken but many don't.
This also applies to the inside of Tibetan temples (it's too dark
anyways).


On Tue, 30 Aug 2005 03:20:11 GMT, "Faz" <chuckfaz@shaw.ca> wrote:

>If you ask local officials, are you able to take photos of government
>establishments or is it totally against the rules. Also will a radio shack
>adapter work in China? I'm all excited and want to record as many photos as
>possible and not run into any trouble. I know the cardinal rule is always
>ask first. Just looking for any expierenced travellers.....
>
>
>Thanks,
>FAZ.
>
Anonymous
August 31, 2005 3:02:21 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

On Tue, 30 Aug 2005 03:20:11 GMT, "Faz" <chuckfaz@shaw.ca> wrote:

>If you ask local officials, are you able to take photos of government
>establishments or is it totally against the rules.

I went to Shanghai some time ago. Some places are explicitely
prohibited to photography like for example the Shanghai Airport.

Also a bhuddist Temple in Shanghai did not allow photography inside.
One can really offend the people here if you do! (My chinese customer
told me that of course it would be ok to take photographs despite
signes everywhere. ) We then fled though as the people started
yelling at us when I unpacked my 20D.

Other places where you see officials (there are so many of them, all
wearing some different kind of uniform) it is advisable to ask first.
For example I was not allowed to take pictures inside the shanghai
olympic stadium. (I asked at three gates which were all guarded)

On the other hand, you can take photographs without any problems for
example in the shanghai museum at peoples square. (Some of the old
paintings can not be photographed with flash)

And as you might look like a western, a lot of people will want to
talk to you to practice english. They do also like to be in contact
with you by e-mail although the communist party is controlling the
internet as well.

I sent once a picture by e-mail to the chinese man I met at the
longhua's martyrs cemetery I took from him which made him really
happy!

Have a nice stay in China. Please note that if you plan to visit the
Oriental pear tv tower the time it takes to buy a ticket is in no
relation to the time you have to wait at night! Do bring a circular
polar filter though to avoid nasty reflections caused by the
plexi-glas at the 350 M level. (Shortly after the entrance you will
have to put your bag through x-ray and walk through a metal detector
yourself)

Hope you enjoy your stay, and I even might see some photos one day!?

best regards,

Mark Clemens
August 31, 2005 10:29:37 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

2005-08-30, Mark Clemens wrote:
>[...]
> I sent once a picture by e-mail to the chinese man I met at the
> longhua's martyrs cemetery I took from him which made him really
> happy!

Hmm, we took some photo's of small children, when we were in China a few
weeks ago. Took the memory card to a 1-hr photoshop, had some printed, and
gave them to the proud mothers. Made them very happy :-)

-peter
Anonymous
September 3, 2005 5:24:11 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital (More info?)

We just returned from 26 days in China in June . You are absolutely right
on all counts. I took two Nikon digital cameras (using the Coolpix 8800
most of the time), and had to borrow a 220-volt adapter from the hotel
several times. Note: the Nikon battery chargers work perfectly from the 220
volts and a converter is not required - only an adapter for the socket.

Like you, we saw a blue sky only a couple days. It appears that all of
china has a pollution problem. I would rather carry two cameras instead of
an SLR with multiple lenses for that reason among others. Had enough
problems with SLRs carrying 35mm everywhere.

Regarding crime: most people in China like Americans. One incident in
Guilin however: two guys followed us for several blocks and kept looking at
the camera. We stopped and let them proceed. They kept looking back, so we
turned down another street.

We took about 2000 pictures. Before you leave, buy 2 or 3 gigabyte memory
cards. I couldn't even find them in Tokyo, although I bought another
battery there for about $45.00 US, which was not too bad. My 8800 camera
there was $1200 US at a major camera store.

Had a great time. While you are there, take the cruise up the river, before
the 3-gorges dam is completed.

Expect a surprise in Shanghai if you have not been there in the last 10
years. We were told that they have built over 1400 buildings over 40 floors
high in the last 15 years.

Have a great time.

--
Graybeard
October 2, 2012 1:44:05 PM

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