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Is 3770k worth skipping 3570k? Coming from i5-650

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December 29, 2012 8:36:05 AM

Hey, so I decided that it was time to step it up in terms of hardware seeing as some of the games nowadays aren't running as much as i would prefer them to.

Current Setup: (Mind you, it is very bad (Be nice))
PSU: KingWin 650w
Mobo: Generic Dell
Case: Haf 912
CPU: i5-650
GPU: GTX 460 v2 OCed to Core: 900 | Mem: 2440 | Shader: 1800
RAM: 6 gigs of generic ram
Harddrive: 1tb WD Black Caviar


What I want to happen hopefully within the next couple of weeks is to get a i7-3770k and a new mobo, the Asrock Extreme4. Will my GPU be too much of a problem that it would be worth it just to wait till I have enough money to purchase both the new CPU and mobo + a new GPU (Hopefully a Nvidia 660+)? Because i'm afraid that my little baby will bottleneck the CPU too much.

Or would the 3770k be overkill vs the 3570k? I know that gaming wise there is practically no difference minus the 3.4 and 3.5 Ghz stock clocks. But I might plan on making youtube videos and the HP would help with the rending and ***.

Thanks for any help you guys give me!

-Shack
December 29, 2012 11:12:28 AM

in gaming there is no difference btw 3570 and 3770 in gaming but if u are going to render videos than the 3770 is better. u should wait a little and gett the cpu mobo and the gpu together wait for the 7 series they are justa round the corner in that time save the money and get a 770 or 780
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December 29, 2012 11:27:08 AM

with the gaming idea, i've had experience with both the i5 and the i7 you're speaking of. i ran a few benchmarks with Crysis 2, and Battlefield 3, and found that when both are clocked at 4ghz, they are nearly identicle. i'm talking a 4fps difference between the 2. i did notice however that while playing Planetside 2, the i7 didn't drop as far down as the i5 in the extreme situations that are frequent in the game.

however i have no experience with the rendering performance of the 2. i use an AMD FX 8350 at 4.5ghz for all my rendering needs. but i can guess that the hyperthreading will come in handy.

however, i disagree with Ramzzz936's comment reguarding the 700 series of nvidia cards. i see no need in shooting for the newest of the new. the 600 series performs admirably, and are already running on working drivers for everything. so i think you should look towards one of those.
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December 29, 2012 11:52:29 AM

Only if you played cpu bound games (warcraft) would you bother getting the 3770k cause it seems to be better, but not much for 100bucks really. If cpu bound games are your thing, i would wait for haswell and a gtx780. If not a 3570k and a gtx670 would cover every game at 1920x1080 res.
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December 29, 2012 12:19:45 PM

hyperthreading wont help you make videos if you use quicksync (which you should.) quicksync has the best quality of all the hardware encoders. it is still not quite as good as doing a straight up software encode but it is considerably faster.

quicksync is the bomb and negates any sort of need or want for hyperthreading for encoding imo.

edit for spelling errors
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December 29, 2012 2:50:17 PM

keep in mind, those benchmarks are done with 100mhz more on the 3770k. after all is said and done with overclocking the 3570k will probably have the higher clockspeed. it runs cooler.
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December 29, 2012 7:06:35 PM

lostgamer_03 said:
http://www.anandtech.com/show/6396/the-vishera-review-a...

Look at the facts and make your choice. :) 

So with all that, I saw that on anything but dawn of war, there was a rough 3-4 frame difference. And like Neon said, the 3770k is still running at 100 mhz faster.

Neon, what is this quicksync you're talking about?
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December 29, 2012 7:11:32 PM

quicksync is a piece of hardware added into intel cpus starting from sandybridge (now ivy) which encodes videos.

it does it faster than anything else (like cuda or openCL.) higher quality than other hardware encoding methods too. software encoding (using cpu, old school) still has better quality by a little but is extremely slow. unless you are doing official releases for a group or something quicksync is by far the best way to encode videos.
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December 29, 2012 7:25:52 PM

Also, while trolling around on that same post that lostgamer posted, I saw that on other subjects (you can change what they tested by clicking the blue text at the bottom) the 3770k blew the 3570k and mostly everything else out of the water. Most of the tests were on encoding and visual work like photoshop. Is this because of the hyperthreading?
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December 29, 2012 7:29:57 PM

being as its not long to haswell i would stick with the 650 for now and get haswell when it hits the stores. in june.
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December 29, 2012 7:38:23 PM

I searched up the Haswell and i got this chart, http://www.pcgamer.com/2012/12/13/intels-haswell-i5-and.... It doesnt look like the Haswells will be stepping it up too much, if anything at all. They seem to be identical aside the integrated graphics, which is not needed on a gaming rig. What do the Haswells bring to the table that i'm not seeing?
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December 29, 2012 7:38:31 PM

yes, programs like that take advantage of hyperthreading. however, you can probably take encoding off that list because quicksync is considerably faster than a software encode with hyperthreading.

there are still other professional grade programs which will take advantage of hyperthreading. however, if you dont use them then its 100 dollars you'll never take advantage of.

edit: haswell is still half a year away... that really isnt very soon.
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December 29, 2012 9:14:54 PM

Shameful bump
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December 29, 2012 10:47:01 PM

neon neophyte said:
... those benchmarks are done with 100mhz more on the 3770k. after all is said and done with overclocking the 3570k will probably have the higher clockspeed. it runs cooler.
Thanks for this: hit the nail, on the head. (Had been looking at the i5-3450.)
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January 1, 2013 2:06:04 PM

GearShack said:
I searched up the Haswell and i got this chart, http://www.pcgamer.com/2012/12/13/intels-haswell-i5-and.... It doesnt look like the Haswells will be stepping it up too much, if anything at all. They seem to be identical aside the integrated graphics, which is not needed on a gaming rig. What do the Haswells bring to the table that i'm not seeing?

no mate they aint the same. your looking at 10% per clock increase in performance along with better onchip gfx.
they should also run cooler and overclock better some are thinking 6ghz while others reckon 5.5 without bumping voltages by huge amounts.
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