Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question
Solved

Why are these 2 CPUs the same price?

Last response: in CPUs
Share
December 31, 2012 4:39:23 AM

I don't get why the Intel i5 3570k (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...) and the i5 2500k (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...) are the same exact price, at least on Newegg.

The 3570k has slightly higher clocks, fully supports PCIe 3.0, has better on-board graphics, consumes less power, and is Ivy Bridge architecture, which is simply newer and faster.

Is there something I'm missing about the 2500k?

More about : cpus price

Best solution

a c 162 à CPUs
December 31, 2012 4:49:21 AM
Share

well there isnt much of a difference in the two generations to make the 2500k less. the i7s and i3s are the same since sandy bridge 2500k, overclocks farther than the ivy bridge while producing less heat, but ivy bridge requires less of a overclock to reach the higher clocked oc of the sandy bridge cpus. so at stock speeds the 3570k wins, but it has it downsides of heat production.

Plus intel isnt going to mark down any cpu thats only a yearish old that performs near there newest cpu just because its last generation. I mean they wouldnt make any money off ivy bridge if they marked the sandy bridge cpus more than $20 less than ivy bridge. Obviously the sandy bridge cpus were cheaper than ivy bridge when it released but at this point they stay the same as for reasons above lol
a b à CPUs
December 31, 2012 4:55:01 AM

one of the things is that a "K" series sandy's run cooler meaning that for the same cooling solution, a sandy may offer marginally more OC'ing headroom. The ivy is roughly 10 % faster but system power draw under load for both are nearly the same with ivy maybe drawing 1-2 W less.

There is something called hot carrier damage that all cpu's experience and that decides the overall life of you cpu. for every 10C rise in temp, you half the life of a cpu. what this means is if you expect your cpu to last 20 years with an operating temp of 70C then it will last for 40 years with 60C.

and the fact that some people know the above helps marketing people sell older tech for a premium :p ...sad but true
Related resources
a b à CPUs
December 31, 2012 4:56:35 AM

Murderotica926 said:
I don't get why the Intel i5 3570k (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...) and the i5 2500k (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...) are the same exact price, at least on Newegg.

The 3570k has slightly higher clocks, fully supports PCIe 3.0, has better on-board graphics, consumes less power, and is Ivy Bridge architecture, which is simply newer and faster.

Is there something I'm missing about the 2500k?


What do you mean it fully supports PCIe 3.0? Thats not a cpu function.

Nobody who buys the K series is going to be using onboard graphics anyways. So that matters not. The power usage between the two is negligible. And the 3570 is only 6% to 9% faster. On the flip side, the 2500K overclocks better, which does matter to a K series chip. There really isn't a whole lot separating those two chips from the perspective of the target market.

However, the real reason the prices are identical is that intel never drops prices of old generation parts once a new generation appears. AMD moves older generation parts down the price list and makes them value processors, but intel just leaves the price where they are and lets stock deplete. One of many reasons I prefer AMD. The 8350 will someday be a $100 part, fully unlocked and all. You will never see a 2500K or 3570K at $100.
a c 176 à CPUs
December 31, 2012 4:58:41 AM

also a reseller cant sell a product lower then the vendor set map price. when you see priceing issues like that most times it because the vendor sales team not watching where there product map prices are.
December 31, 2012 5:15:23 AM

FALC0N said:
What do you mean it fully supports PCIe 3.0? Thats not a cpu function.

Nobody who buys the K series is going to be using onboard graphics anyways. So that matters not. The power usage between the two is negligible. And the 3570 is only 6% to 9% faster. On the flip side, the 2500K overclocks better, which does matter to a K series chip. There really isn't a whole lot separating those two chips from the perspective of the target market.

However, the real reason the prices are identical is that intel never drops prices of old generation parts once a new generation appears. AMD moves older generation parts down the price list and makes them value processors, but intel just leaves the price where they are and lets stock deplete. One of many reasons I prefer AMD. The 8350 will someday be a $100 part, fully unlocked and all. You will never see a 2500K or 3570K at $100.


With modern Intel CPUs the PCIe controller is now on the CPU. And Sandy Bridge's PCIe controller was only built to support 2.0/2.1

Is lower heat the sole reason Sandy Bridge CPUs OC better? Or are there other factors involved?
a b à CPUs
December 31, 2012 5:27:38 AM

Murderotica926 said:
With modern Intel CPUs the PCIe controller is now on the CPU. And Sandy Bridge's PCIe controller was only built to support 2.0/2.1

Is lower heat the sole reason Sandy Bridge CPUs OC better? Or are there other factors involved?


Duh.....I forgot about that. Proof that should be in bed already.

I think its other factors. The OC advantage seems to be related to the die shrink somehow. Maybe those pesky new 3d transistors. Ivy bridge does draw a lot more power and heat up as frequency ramps but I don't think thats is what's holding it back. But I do think the power and heat are symptoms of the bigger problem.
December 31, 2012 5:38:50 AM

hmm... well, reading reviews for both, people do seem to get higher clocks and lower temps with the 2500k. But I mean... my new HD7970 apparently needs PCIe 3.0 to reach maximum potential. Which honestly may be only 2 or 3 more FPS over 2.0... tough call. A local vendor here has the 2500k for $160 and the 3570K for $190. Decisions decisions...
a b à CPUs
December 31, 2012 5:43:40 AM

Murderotica926 said:
hmm... well, reading reviews for both, people do seem to get higher clocks and lower temps with the 2500k. But I mean... my new HD7970 apparently needs PCIe 3.0 to reach maximum potential. Which honestly may be only 2 or 3 more FPS over 2.0... tough call. A local vendor here has the 2500k for $160 and the 3570K for $190. Decisions decisions...

$30 more for 3 extra fps would make sense when you jump from 27 fps to 30 fps at whatever resolution you chose or from 57 fps to 60+ fps (wrote that for eagle eyed gamers :)  ) but your case would more likely be like jumping from (idk) 100 fps to 103. stick with 2500K
a b à CPUs
December 31, 2012 6:18:27 AM

Murderotica926 said:
hmm... well, reading reviews for both, people do seem to get higher clocks and lower temps with the 2500k. But I mean... my new HD7970 apparently needs PCIe 3.0 to reach maximum potential. Which honestly may be only 2 or 3 more FPS over 2.0... tough call. A local vendor here has the 2500k for $160 and the 3570K for $190. Decisions decisions...



Thats not a tough decision at all. I go 2500k at those price points.
December 31, 2012 7:06:30 AM

You can run PCI-e 3.0 on sandybridge as long as its supported on your motherboard, just like you can run 1866 or 2000+ ghz ram on any intel CPU. I am running my memory @ 1866 right now and my card GPU @ PCIe 3.0 x 16 on sandybridge so I know that it works. The difference is that you get a 5-10% increase in performance with Ivy bridge when running at the same frequency as sandy bridge, but on the other hand ivy bridge get's a lot hotter when running over 4 GHz. If you are planning on building a water loop or going with a high end cooler then go with the 3570k, otherwise get the 2500k as you can push it much further on standard cooling
a c 88 à CPUs
December 31, 2012 9:34:59 AM

glad to see common sense prevailing...
December 31, 2012 11:53:27 AM

if u are going to oc sandy bridge is better if not i5 3570k is the better option u can oc it too but it will produce more heat the sandy bridge processors
December 31, 2012 9:03:44 PM

hdeezie80 said:
You can run PCI-e 3.0 on sandybridge as long as its supported on your motherboard, just like you can run 1866 or 2000+ ghz ram on any intel CPU. I am running my memory @ 1866 right now and my card GPU @ PCIe 3.0 x 16 on sandybridge so I know that it works. The difference is that you get a 5-10% increase in performance with Ivy bridge when running at the same frequency as sandy bridge, but on the other hand ivy bridge get's a lot hotter when running over 4 GHz. If you are planning on building a water loop or going with a high end cooler then go with the 3570k, otherwise get the 2500k as you can push it much further on standard cooling


so... would this MB enable PCI-e 3.0 data transfer between my 7970 and a Sandy Bridge CPU?

I definitely plan on overclocking to the limit, especially when I begin to crossfire. So right now I'm leaning towards the 2500k, and for $160... how can I turn that down
January 1, 2013 6:59:20 PM

Best answer selected by Murderotica926.
January 1, 2013 7:01:32 PM

well I ended up buying the Ivy Bridge i5 because my local Micro Center dropped the price from $190 to $170, and also completely stopped selling the Sand Bridge i5 altogether. I also believe that if the IB runs 5% than the SB at identical clock speeds, it makes a bigger speed difference at 4.4ghz than it does at 3.4ghz
!