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Computer and CPU overheat

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  • CPUs
  • Power Supplies
  • Overheat
Last response: in CPUs
Anonymous
December 31, 2012 8:45:23 AM

Hi, first of all, I got this PC (Its not a gaming PC), and it is getting overheated, the CPU especially, though I placed the heatsink that came with the CPU.
My main problem is that, the heatsink alone, still makes the CPU overheat and turn off!! (I mean a heatsink should at least decrease the CPU tempreture just so it doesn't turn off) But I put the Power Supply over the heat sink, since my Power Supply has a fan, and now the CPU doesn't turn off, but it is still getting overheated and throttles a lot in games, even in the WEAKEST games.

Here are the specs:

-Intel Pentium 4 650 (3.4 GHz) (Tempreture: I can't test Pentium 4 temp, but I can say its more than 80C, since it throttles a lot in games)

-Nvidia GeForce 8400GS (Tempreture: 60C while not in game, 75 while in a modern game)

-3 GB of DDR2 RAM

I am really afraid that the power supply (550W) gets overheaten since I am using it for cooling the 100C CPU.

I will buy another computer when I get the money (5-6 months from now), but untill then, I want to get a solution for the computer being overheaten.

Is there some kind of a cooling system I can make at home? Since its really hard to find cooling components for Socket 755 and my VISA doesn't work online, so I can't buy online stuff.

Best,
MJaoune

More about : computer cpu overheat

a b à CPUs
a b ) Power supply
December 31, 2012 9:27:52 AM

you should immediately get an after market cpu cooler if that is not possible you can also get a new thermal compound for your cpu heat sink but make sure you apply it correctly.
also remember to clean the heat sink and the fan off any dust that might have settled
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Anonymous
December 31, 2012 10:40:18 AM

siddharthmukul007 said:
you should immediately get an after market cpu cooler if that is not possible you can also get a new thermal compound for your cpu heat sink but make sure you apply it correctly.
also remember to clean the heat sink and the fan off any dust that might have settled


Quote:
Since its really hard to find cooling components for Socket 755


And I've already applied thermal paste to the CPU
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a b à CPUs
a b ) Power supply
December 31, 2012 11:23:48 AM

try to check out cheep coolers such as the cooler master hyper tx3 etc. they do support 775 socket
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Anonymous
December 31, 2012 11:47:51 AM

Ok I will search for it.

Update: Removing the case cover will decrease the CPU throttle by more than a half. Anyway to get the heat out of the case using a different method?
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a b à CPUs
a b ) Power supply
December 31, 2012 12:08:30 PM

well there are various methods to do that....you can try using a small standing fan to work as a exhaust while keeping the case open.
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Anonymous
December 31, 2012 12:31:02 PM

yeah, agreed with that.

BTW can you give me just a brief info about the water-cooling? what is it and how does it work? And does it need to be refilled with water?
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Best solution

a b à CPUs
a b ) Power supply
December 31, 2012 2:01:13 PM

there are two ways of water cooling....one is custom water cooling that requires refilling from time to time as well as it expensive and requires some good knowledge. Second is prefilled nd ready to use water cooling.this is not only inexpensive but also easy to setup and also does not require any maintenance.
but you better performance and flexibility in the former.
Share
December 31, 2012 2:12:29 PM

There's something seriously wrong here, if your CPU is running around 100 C you run the risk of frying it.

Is there not a fan on your heatsink? If so is it working?
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a b à CPUs
a b ) Power supply
December 31, 2012 2:14:57 PM

I don't have a fan on my heatsink with my P4 set up. The fan is the case exhaust with a shroud to allow the fan to pull heat off the heatsink.
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December 31, 2012 2:50:33 PM

I'm not familiar with that processor, however I think you should have a fan mounted directly on the heatsink. I haven't been able to find a picture but Intel's website does indicate the P4 series should have heatsink mounted fan.

Quote:
Fan heat sink

The fan heatsink included with the boxed Intel® Pentium® 4 processor must be securely attached to the processor. Thermal interface material (preapplied, attached to the bottom of the heatsink) provides effective heat transfer from the processor to the fan heatsink. The fan cable provides power to the fan by connecting to a motherboard-mounted power header and also allows the transfer of information to and from the fan with the motherboard. (Only motherboards with hardware monitoring circuitry can use the fan speed signal. Additional circuitry is required for motherboard based fan speed control) Be sure to follow the installation procedures documented in the boxed processor manual and the Integration Overview (for the boxed Intel® Pentium® 4 processor in the 775-land package ).

The fan is a high-quality ball bearing fan that provides a good local air stream. This air stream transfers heat from the heatsink to the air inside the system. However, moving heat to the system air is only half the task. Sufficient system airflow is also needed in order to exhaust the air. Without a steady stream of air through the system, the fan heatsink will recirculate warm air, and therefore may not cool the processor adequately.



Source: http://www.intel.com/support/processors/pentium4/sb/CS-...
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Anonymous
December 31, 2012 3:42:58 PM

Avenged7x said:
There's something seriously wrong here, if your CPU is running around 100 C you run the risk of frying it.

Is there not a fan on your heatsink? If so is it working?


No it doesn't have a fan, thats why I am using my power supply fan to get the heat away from the heat sink. But a heat sink should be enough just so the CPU doesn't turn off.

I don't know the exact tempreture, but a Pentium 4 and better processors, have the technology of throttling instead of frying, meaning like, if its really hot, it decreases its frequency to 600-1000 MHz for 1 second or 2 so it cools itself and keeps its high temp from increasing, if it doesn increase, then it turns itself off so it doesn't get fried. So a Pentium 4 wont fry itself like other old or AMD processors (I am not saying Intel is better, nor AMD, just saying the truth)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v1qr6lZ52-k <-- I think its from Tom's Hardware


Best,
MJaoune
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a b à CPUs
a b ) Power supply
December 31, 2012 4:41:10 PM

it is really terrible that you don't have a cpu heat sink fan..you should get 1 right away or better still get an after market cooler.
you are risking damaging both the cpu as well as the main board itself.
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December 31, 2012 5:33:24 PM

A TEMPORARY solution may be to try to mount a case fan to your heatsink. But you really should be purchasing a proper heat sink fan or an aftermarket cooler ASAP.

I know newer generation chips do throttle down as a failsafe, but I wouldn't assume that running it that hot isn't or will not eventually cause damage.
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Anonymous
December 31, 2012 7:33:19 PM

Best answer selected by MJaoune.
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