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New homebuilt gamingpc - Will those parts work correctly?

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August 17, 2012 3:19:54 PM

Hello everyone!

This is my first build, my previous computer (and also the first in my life) was a Dell XPS.
It was a quite nice pc, but now for my next one (this barely can run BF3), I want to build it myself, because it's much cheaper (and fun).
I've searched a lot about it, if it all fits and so, but I'm not 100% sure, I'd like to ask from all of you if it would at least run, and if some parts would run better (like MSI videocard in place of Asus and so on).
I live in the Netherlands and will buy everything from here, so the prices can differ.

Note: I've searched a lot about if the processor I choose (AMD FX-8150) is better than a i5 in the same price class, and I switched back and forth, heard people saying good things about one, then the other. I previously owned an Intel processor, and I wanted to choose one, but they are more expensive. I know the FX-8150 isn't always used, because not many applications use all those cores. But I give it a try, and see how it works out. So that will stay the same.

So my parts are the following:

Case: Corsair Carbide 500R, + I'll buy 2x 140mm fans for the "optional" places on it (I think the top, not sure, couldn't find that but that will be fine).

PSU: Sharkoon WPM600 (600 W, 48 A on 12V, 24 A on 3,3 V which I've read are "good")

Motherboard: Asus SABERTOOTH 990FX R2.0

Processor: AMD FX-8150

RAM: Corsair 16 GB DDR3-1866 Quad-Kit (CMZ16GX3M4X1866C9)

Video card: Asus GTX680-DC2T-2GD5 (cores factory oc'd to 1137 MHz, boost to 1201 MHz, dual fans)

Storage: SSD: Corsair CSSD-F240GB3-BK HDD: an older (Sata 2) 500 GB Samsung drive for extra storage

Will this be all fine?
And what do I have to buy which aren't included? For example a Sata 3 cable (in this case it's included, but those things). I don't want to end up with that something is missing.
I also read about a thing you need to mount the PCU, something which grounds your static electricity or something like that.

So that's it!
Thank you for help!
August 17, 2012 3:55:32 PM

FYI, some time ago AMD announced that they would no longer compete with Intel for desktop CPU business. If they don't think their chips are competitive why would anybody else?
August 17, 2012 4:30:21 PM

Well, I'll stick with AMD for now I think, I've read and seen a lot of benchmarks, and unless they're all lieing, the combinations of an FX-8150 and a GTX 680 is really good. And because of I don't want to spend too much money, but want some performance, I'll stay with this.
I just ask if this system will actually work, and I ask for some advice about what else I should buy for the building of the system.
Related resources
a b B Homebuilt system
August 17, 2012 4:37:08 PM

for the price of the 8150 + 990X you can get a 3570K + Z77 and blow the 8150 away
August 17, 2012 4:40:36 PM

Wont matter cause that PSU will knock out everything. Never in my life have I heard of a brand named Sharkoon. :p 
August 17, 2012 4:45:22 PM

OK, thanks for the reply.
But is AMD that worse?
So 8 cores of 3600 MHz are so much worse than a processor without hyperthreading, and 4 cores of 3400 MHz?
Yes, the intel has that turbo, but you can OC the AMD, too.
And the intel is about 50 dollars more expensive, only the processor already.
August 17, 2012 4:47:04 PM

Well, about that PSU, I've read about 50 reviews here in the Netherlands, and they all say it's very good, I've even read reviews of people using it with the GTX 680. I've never heard about that brand either, but from all those reviews it looked nice and it's quite cheap.
August 17, 2012 5:07:54 PM

That's a pretty good list you've got there, but there are definitely some changes I'd make:

1) Drop the 16GB to 8GB of RAM. 8GB is more than enough, so unless you really need the extra RAM for something that you know will perform better with it, you'll have no issues with just 8GB.

2) Change the PSU - Sharkoon are a good decent brand, as most of their power supplies are made by FSP (great) and Enhance Electronics (pretty good), that WPM600 is made by CWT (not so great). Most of their PSUs are also not 80PLUS certified. Seeing as I'm not from the Netherlands, I can't really make great price/performance suggestions, but I can list some great PSUs to choose from (make sure it has at least an 80PLUS rating):

- Corsair TX-V2, HX, and AX series
- Antec HCG and Neo Eco series
- Rosewill Capstone series
- Anything from Seasonic, XFX, PC Power & Cooling, FSP, Be Quiet!, NZXT, SilverPower, and SuperFlower

3) The FX-8150 is slower than a 2500k in a lot of scenarios - its 8 cores are actually what are crippling its architecture's speed. If you really like to overclock/tweak your hardware, you can actually get its performance close to an overclocked 2500k, but if that's something you'd rather avoid, go Intel. Although, if you do want to overclock/tweak/otherwise play around with an FX chip, get the more affordable 8120 instead - virtually the same binning, lower stock clocks.

4) If you plan on overclocking any, get an aftermarket cooler: the Hyper212 (Plus and EVO models) are both good budget options here in the States, so I'd imagine they'll be comparable in the Netherlands. FrostyTech is a good place to check out the performance of coolers.
a b B Homebuilt system
August 17, 2012 5:20:45 PM

METROID4 said:
OK, thanks for the reply.
But is AMD that worse?
So 8 cores of 3600 MHz are so much worse than a processor without hyperthreading, and 4 cores of 3400 MHz?
Yes, the intel has that turbo, but you can OC the AMD, too.
And the intel is about 50 dollars more expensive, only the processor already.



the Intel Processor is more expensive, but a good Z77 motherboard is much cheaper than a Sabertooth. an i5-3570K + As Rock Z77 Extreme 4 will run about the same as an 8150 and Sabertooth 990X


here is the 8150 vs the 2500K, the 3570K is about 10-15% better

http://www.anandtech.com/bench/Product/434?vs=288
August 17, 2012 5:47:41 PM

A bargain isn't what you pay, it's what you get. AMD CPUs are not a bargain for a performance oriented desktop computer. It's as simple as that. Even AMD agrees.
August 18, 2012 8:24:45 AM

Thank you for your helpful reply!
Ok so here's what I've thought:

1)
I say to all my friends that 4 GB of RAM is enough for up to moderate gaming (or some higher), and 8 GB for if you host games, and play some serious demanding games.
The reason I wanted to have 16 GB of RAM in quad channel, because if I choose for 8 GB of RAM in quad channel (4x 2GB), then upgrading is more difficult (as you have to replace RAM), and 2x2GB is dual channel, and I don't know if 2x 2x4GB, so in total 16 GB of RAM (in later upgrade) in 2x dual channel will be as fast as one quad channel (4x4 GB of the same type designed for quad channel) RAM. And that little price difference doesn't matter, if I would get benefit in the future. But I'm glad to hear corrections about this!

2)
Well, I double checked everything, except my PSU... I was really stupid to not think about the brand of my PSU, and that it's maybe not so good. When I started to make this list, I just made sure it's enough Watts and Amperes in the 12V, 3,3 V etc. Didn't think about quality jet, but now I'll definitely change iit to a good brand as Corsair. That's for sure!

3)
And if I seriously overclock (still stable, not going in 29 GHz or so :D  ) the FX-8150, will that be faster? And how much can you OC the that i5?
I actually wanted an upgrade of what I have now, and now I have a first generation i7 870, which is some lower than that i5, but it has hyperthreading (will that matter?).
And I've read that still most of the applications don't use the 8 cores of the FX-8150 jet, but I heard (not sure if it's true, someone experienced it) that Windows 8 (already in the preview release) uses multiple cores much better.
And Battlefield 3 is also more happy to see those cores, too. So the i5 is faster, but is it possible that if an application (a game, or maybe an OS) really uses 8 cores, will be then the FX-8150 faster?
I'll do some more research about this, look for what I can change on my computer (this is just exactly the top of my budget).

4)
Yes, I've thought about that. I think if I'll buy a processor, and will OC it, that first I'll stay with the stock cooler (I don't want to remove something in my PC, and as I said, I can't spend anymore), and later (in maybe 4 months or so) will buy a liquid cooler for it (don't know if that's good, but I'll research that when I'll upgrade the cooler).

So, thank you a lot for your helpful reply! You've pointed out some good things I'll possibly change!



mousseng said:
That's a pretty good list you've got there, but there are definitely some changes I'd make:

1) Drop the 16GB to 8GB of RAM. 8GB is more than enough, so unless you really need the extra RAM for something that you know will perform better with it, you'll have no issues with just 8GB.

2) Change the PSU - Sharkoon are a good decent brand, as most of their power supplies are made by FSP (great) and Enhance Electronics (pretty good), that WPM600 is made by CWT (not so great). Most of their PSUs are also not 80PLUS certified. Seeing as I'm not from the Netherlands, I can't really make great price/performance suggestions, but I can list some great PSUs to choose from (make sure it has at least an 80PLUS rating):

- Corsair TX-V2, HX, and AX series
- Antec HCG and Neo Eco series
- Rosewill Capstone series
- Anything from Seasonic, XFX, PC Power & Cooling, FSP, Be Quiet!, NZXT, SilverPower, and SuperFlower

3) The FX-8150 is slower than a 2500k in a lot of scenarios - its 8 cores are actually what are crippling its architecture's speed. If you really like to overclock/tweak your hardware, you can actually get its performance close to an overclocked 2500k, but if that's something you'd rather avoid, go Intel. Although, if you do want to overclock/tweak/otherwise play around with an FX chip, get the more affordable 8120 instead - virtually the same binning, lower stock clocks.

4) If you plan on overclocking any, get an aftermarket cooler: the Hyper212 (Plus and EVO models) are both good budget options here in the States, so I'd imagine they'll be comparable in the Netherlands. FrostyTech is a good place to check out the performance of coolers.
August 18, 2012 8:40:52 AM

Oh and I wanted to add that I'll use my pc not only for gaming, but also video editting. So things I'll do with it:
- Serious gaming, I play BF3, MW3 (well, that doesn't demand for that much, I can already run that on the max), ArmA 2 (can't run that at all, really CPU intensive), Skyrim, Crysis 1-2, and I'm planning on playing heavy games in the future (Crysis 3, Watch Dogs, Black ops 2, possible Battlefield 4 (or what it'll be) and so on.

- But I also multitask a lot (having 20 tabs of Chrome open, some words, powerpoints, compressing/encoding video in background, talking with skype, burning DVD etc). That's one of the other reasons of my 16 GB of RAM.

- And I also edit video's a LOT, not only captured video's with our camera (1920x1080 @ 50 FPS, some large video files), but also things I've captured with Fraps (some lengthy video's of 80 GB). So that's one of the reasons for my FX-8150.

One other thing, is there a chance that I'll be able to upgrade my processor later? So if AMD releases for example a 12 core modell in 2 years, is there a chance I'll be able to upgrade? Or AMD really stopped making desktop CPU's?

I think for my next computer, I'll be earning more, so then I'll choose one of the best Intel CPU's, like now I wanted to choose the i7-3960X or so, but that's a little bit more expensive... :whistle: 

So I have to hold out with this computer for about 3 years at max, then I'll buy a more serious one (I mean for the processor, I take that my SSD, RAM and Video card are good? :D  )

And does the CPU actually matter so much in gaming? So I mean, a GTX 680 factory OC'd, which is one of the best video card ATM, only the GTX 690 is better (2x performance, 2x price), and maybe (not sure about that) the best Ati radeon is little better in some applications.
But will that GTX 680 not take games with ease? So the processor is just a little help for it or is it much more important than I thought?

Thank you for your replies!
August 18, 2012 8:54:13 AM

And I forgot to say I also play SC1-2 (very CPU intensive), and everything in 1920x1080, and I'll possibly upgrade that in a year, to a higher resolution.
August 18, 2012 9:12:44 AM

Ok I have an other solution.
What is a better combination for my mentioned computer use (heavy gaming, heavy video editting).
The price is the same.

1.
What my original system was
Processor: FX-8150 (8/8 @ 3600 MHz)
Video card: GTX 680, 1536 cores @ (Factory OC'd) 1137 MHz, can boost itself to 1201 MHz

2.
Little lower GPU, higher (?) CPU
Processor: i7-3770K (4/8 @ 3500 MHz, turbo to 3900 MHz)
GPU: GTX 670 2 GB, 1344 cores @ 1006 MHz, can boost itself to 1084 MHz

3.
Something in between:
Processor: i5-2500K
GPU: Standard GTX 680 (no Factory OC)

Personally I think combo 2 is the best (if you can OC the i7-3770K, and if it's better than the i5-2500K, which I think it is), because in that scenario, I can SLI later an other GTX 670. GPU is easier to upgrade, because you can SLI an other GPU (the same model though), but upgrading a CPU means you loose the first, you can't add a second).
What do you think about it?
August 18, 2012 9:27:42 AM

Ok guys I have an other setup, it's even cheaper than my original:

Same case (Corsair Carbide 500R)
PSU: Will search a good Corsair
Motherboard: ASRock Z77 Extreme4 (not jet researched for all the possibilities, this seemed good)
Processor: i7-3770K
RAM: Corsair 16 GB DDR3-1866 Quad-Kit
GPU: EVGA Geforce GTX 670 FTW
Same SSD (Corsair CSSD-F240GB3-BK)
And then a WLAN in it: TP-LINK TL-WN851ND (didn't have that in the original).

I think this is the best setup I could find, and the good thing is that the processor seems/is good, in the higher range, all the other things are good too, and the GPU is little lower, but still a monster. And I can SLI that GPU later, which will again (almost) double the GPU performance.

Other suggestions?

Thank you!
a b B Homebuilt system
August 18, 2012 10:27:20 AM

METROID4 said:
Ok guys I have an other setup, it's even cheaper than my original:

Same case (Corsair Carbide 500R)
PSU: Will search a good Corsair
Motherboard: ASRock Z77 Extreme4 (not jet researched for all the possibilities, this seemed good)
Processor: i7-3770K
RAM: Corsair 16 GB DDR3-1866 Quad-Kit
GPU: EVGA Geforce GTX 670 FTW
Same SSD (Corsair CSSD-F240GB3-BK)
And then a WLAN in it: TP-LINK TL-WN851ND (didn't have that in the original).k

I think this is the best setup I could find, and the good thing is that the processor seems/is good, in the higher range, all the other things are good too, and the GPU is little lower, but still a monster. And I can SLI that GPU later, which will again (almost) double the GPU performance.

Other suggestions?

Thank you!



this will be a very solid build - the I7 will be helpful in video editing more than games thanks to hyperthreading. Hyperthreading doesn't help as much in gaming. If you're overclocking, a 2x8GB kit will be better -- fewer RAM Sticks means a slightly higher overclock usually (about 100 MHz). Also every socket 1155 is dual channel anyway, so your quad-channel kit will act like two sets of dual channel. get the 2x8 if its cheaper, otherwise stick to the 4x4gb. you might also save a bit with DDR3-1600 - you won't notice the difference.

I didn't see a power supply in there, but I'll suggest a quality 750 to 850W psu
August 18, 2012 5:54:50 PM

For video editing and such, the i7 will benefit greatly over the i5, and will even benefit over the 8150. For your purposes, I'd easily take the i7/670 over an i5/680 any day.

I'm a bit foggy on multi-channel memory, but I think your quad-channel kit might end up running as dual-channel anyway? Don't take my word for it. But I suppose the extra RAM would definitely help you, so 16GB is fine.

On your PSU, I think what you're looking for is something like this.

Other than that, that build looks great.
August 19, 2012 9:57:04 AM

Ok, thanks for the replies guys! I didn't have time to search for a PSU yet, but will look at the suggestion.
I've also read that the motherboard sees the RAM as 2x dual channel, so I'll change that.
This is a guideline, so the PSU, RAM and motherboard can/will still change a little.
But if some years later this pc will loose speed in games (so games will only run in lowest setyings), will an SLI of 2x GTX 670 (so I'll add a one) boost it again? I think it will, because in my previous Dell system, my i7-870 is still more than enough for today's heaviest games, so I take that my new i7 will also last.
For the RAM I'll possibly stick with 2x 4GB, so I can upgrade easily. But now we aren't in the time of upgrading RAM, means much more performance. Putting in 64 GB won't make it run BF3 on 6 monitors without a high end GPU/CPU.

So that's it, thank you for your suggestions! From now on this little changes I'll make, and I'm good to go!
If I get the new system (I have to wait for about 2 weeks with it), I'll post in one post how it worked out.

Thanks you all!
September 12, 2012 7:54:13 PM

Hello guys again!

I've bought everything on monday, and today I've built my computer!
It was a great experience to see all the parts, in the boxes.
I've built everything very precisely and carefully.
Now the system works great and is fully operational.
I've installed Win7 in like 5 minutes (from USB).
Boot is unmeasureable without any install.
Now I've installed the graphics driver.
The parts are the following:

Case: Corsair Carbide 500R, yes it's amazing big, stylish and cool!
PSU: Corsair CMPSU-750TXV2
Motherboard: ASRock Z77 Extreme4 (extremely nice Bios, good OC'ing options!)
Processor: i7-3770K with Antec KÜHLER H2O 920 (it's keeping it around 10 degrees)
RAM: I went for still 16 GB, but 1600 MHz. There's almost no difference. It's the Corsair 16 GB DDR3-1600 Quad-Kit. (this motherboard supports quad channel)
Graphics card: It's a GTX 670 from ZOTAC, the AMP! edition (OC'd to 1098 MHz, good fans and cooling)
SSD: Corsair CSSD-F240GB3-BK, it's really fast
WLAN: stayed with the TP-LINK TL-WN851ND. Not that great signal, but it was 10 euros. At home I use the cable though.
And I put two 140 mm Sharkoon system fans on the top of the case.

It's awesome!
Thank you guys for persuading me to buy an Intel again, this is defenitely a great choice!
March 2, 2013 1:43:26 PM

The GTX 670 is an monster, have a good time gaming. :) 
!