Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question
Solved

New build for workstation

Tags:
  • New Build
  • Systems
  • Product
Last response: in Systems
Share
August 17, 2012 4:56:11 PM

Hi all

I work for a company that uses PCs in the office and out in the field, and I'm the one who takes care of PC builds and installation. I have another build coming up soon but am not sure as to the perfect choice of parts.

As a guideline for all of you, I typically follow the system builder marathon's GAMER PC build because we must remain cost-efficient but still get decent performance with quality parts. However, I have built 2 systems from the current June 2012 and found them to be somewhat disappointing and unbalanced. I'm looking for a new setup with the same idea in mind - ~$600 gaming PC - but as balanced and stable as possible. Here's some background info for what we can and can't do, and what the build WILL be required to do:

Limitations:
Intel processor and boxed cooler only
2 x 2GB ram
No case windows, LEDs, etc. if it can be helped
3.5" slot for memory card reader
I'd like to see USB 3.0 support on mobo
Video card will run two monitors via DVI cables
Windows 7 Ultimate 64 bit
$600-650 total budget

Freedom:
Any size tower w/ compatible mobo
Mobo does not require dual graphics support
SSD okay if within budget

PC Use:
Basic Windows operations
Some higher graphics demands with Adobe CS, AutoCAD, etc. (no games, obviously)
Often used in rough environments, with more dust and higher temps
Connects remotely to server, so large storage on HDD is unnecessary

You need only be concerned with the following parts for budget, the rest I already have: CPU, mobo, RAM, GPU, PSU, SSD/HDD (not both), DVD, case

We usually order parts through Amazon (Prime account) or Newegg. Of course, any other sites are fine, but we prefer faster delivery of parts over a small cost savings.

Thanks all, looking forward to your ideas!

More about : build workstation

August 17, 2012 5:04:59 PM

Here you go:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i3-2120 3.3GHz Dual-Core Processor ($124.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: ASRock H77 Pro4/MVP ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($97.55 @ Newegg)
Memory: G.Skill Ares Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($43.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 500GB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($59.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: Sapphire Radeon HD 7750 1GB Video Card ($119.98 @ Newegg)
Case: Cooler Master HAF 912 ATX Mid Tower Case ($59.99 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: Corsair 600W ATX12V Power Supply ($59.99 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Lite-On iHAS124-04 DVD/CD Writer ($21.98 @ Newegg)
Total: $588.46
(Prices include shipping and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2012-08-17 13:06 EDT-0400)
m
0
l
August 17, 2012 6:36:06 PM

Thanks g-unit1111, but I could probably save on the build by downgrading the memory to 2 x 2GB, which is a standard we have been using in our builds (and a requirement I mentioned in my post). That might leave some wiggle to upgrade on the CPU...
m
0
l
Related resources
August 17, 2012 9:02:08 PM

uberchemist said:
Thanks g-unit1111, but I could probably save on the build by downgrading the memory to 2 x 2GB, which is a standard we have been using in our builds (and a requirement I mentioned in my post). That might leave some wiggle to upgrade on the CPU...


$10 isn't going to give much of an opportunity to upgrade the CPU. The extra +-.2GHz on any of the i3-21XX variants aren't really going to be noticeable. If you had more to move from an i3 to an i5 that would be a different story.
m
0
l

Best solution

August 17, 2012 9:35:32 PM

Those little things add up. Cut costs anywhere you can while still maintaining the integrity of the build.

The case for example can definitely be replaced with a cheaper one. Most computer cases are for the ascetics anyway, which I'm assuming isn't very important in this case.

The motherboard is way too expensive for the use. The b75 chipset is a business class chipset that has sata 3 capability and USB 3.0. It is also around 30 dollars cheaper than the h77 motherboard. (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...)

The PSU also hardly needs to be a 600 watt, you could easily get by with 300 knowing how much of a power sipper the 7750 and the i3 is.

All those cost saving measures added up should be plenty to upgrade to an i5 or go for a better video card.
Share
August 17, 2012 10:09:25 PM

Right on! That's more along the lines of my thinking. I'm going to look into that mobo you mentioned and see if I can bump up to an i5! And yes, any cheap case will do, as long as it is sturdy.
m
0
l
August 17, 2012 10:41:34 PM

The sub 40 dollar case market is literally teeming with good choices. The case that I personally use the NXZT Gamma, is a very roomy, very popular and has excellent airflow. (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...) But in all honesty, you should pick a case for yourself. It is personal preference, and depending on your more specific needs, another case might fit your bill better.

For PSU, I would suggest an Antec 380 watt. High efficiency, high reliability. (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...)
m
0
l
August 18, 2012 3:15:29 AM

So, I've made it my challenge to have this build support an i5 processor. Thus, cuts were made elsewhere. Cheap case, memory, optical drive, PSU. That doesn't mean poor quality, however. Here's my lineup thus far:

CPU: Intel Core i5-2400 ($178.46 @ Amazon)
Mobo: Gigabyte LGA 1155 Intel B75 mATX ($72.55 @ Newegg)
Memory: Crucial 2x2GB 240-pin PC3-10600 DIMM DDR3 CT2KIT25664BA1339 ($24.99 @ Newegg)
GPU: Sapphire Radeon HD 6870 1GB (164.99 @ Amazon)
PSU: Antec EarthWatts Green EA-380D ($36.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: ADATA S510 Series AS510S3-120GM-O 2.5" 120GB SSD ($89.99 @ Newegg)
Case: Rosewill R101-P-BK ($33.98 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Samsung SH-222BB/BEBE ($16.99 @ Newegg)

Total: $618.94

One other change you may have noticed: SSD instead of HDD. The reason for this is simple, and I should have mentioned it in my first post but didn't think of it: this machine will hardly ever store much on the local drive since it's constantly connected to a server where all working files are stored. Thus, the local drive is solely for the OS/programs. We've used 60GB in the past, but it gets somewhat crowded when the programs are loaded on, so to retain the speed benefit, the larger capacity was chosen. The difference between this SSD and the HDD is only $30, an obvious choice.

The choice of GPU was actually due to the fact that I already have one of these from a previous build that never happened, so it has been waiting patiently for a new home. I'm still counting it in the total build amount.

Does anyone see any issues with this build as-is?
m
0
l
August 18, 2012 5:24:52 AM

I see no problem here, hope I helped! Just be sure that you have a spare power cord laying around, that particular PSU apparently doesn't come with one!
m
0
l
August 19, 2012 3:16:27 AM

Best answer selected by uberchemist.
m
0
l
August 19, 2012 3:21:10 AM

koudou said:
I see no problem here, hope I helped! Just be sure that you have a spare power cord laying around, that particular PSU apparently doesn't come with one!

Thanks koudou, you really paid attention to my specifications and came up with great suggestions. I'll be using this template for my next build and let you know how it goes!

As for the PSU power cord, I have TOO MANY of those things in my office because we usually order longer cables anyway due to the tower being further from the monitor (gotta love Monoprice.com!). Cheers!
m
0
l
!