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Intel Core 2 Quad Q6600

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June 29, 2012 1:56:57 AM

I bought an Intel Core 2 Quad Q6600 and I have the Radeon 6670. At the time when I bought it I had a Core 2 Duo and it was the best GFX card for my cpu. Now that I have a quad core does this still apply or are there better cards? Also I have a 450 Antec PSU

More about : intel core quad q6600

a b U Graphics card
June 29, 2012 2:14:27 AM

Than a 6670, yes.

Depends on the resolution of your monitor.

1280x1024 - 6870
1600x1200 - 6870
1920x1080 - GTX 560ti
1920x1200 - AMD 7870

Edit: Before you ask, no, I don't believe a Q6600 would be limiting any of these GPU's to any great degree. I would of course reccomend overclocking your processer to ensure that any CPU bound games do perform better, but given the majority of titles are highly GPU driven I do not foresee this becoming a problem.
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Anonymous
a c 117 U Graphics card
June 29, 2012 2:16:37 AM

i would say that you can still handle some very high end cards like:
GTX 480, GTX 570, HD 6970, HD 7850 or below. however that 450 watt PSU will be holding you back to a GTX 460 SE, GTX 550 Ti, HD 6850, HD 7770.
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Related resources
June 29, 2012 2:22:02 AM

I have a 1680x1050 screen
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June 29, 2012 2:24:17 AM

Anonymous said:
i would say that you can still handle some very high end cards like:
GTX 480, GTX 570, HD 6970, HD 7850 or below. however that 450 watt PSU will be holding you back to a GTX 460 SE, GTX 550 Ti, HD 6850, HD 7770.

I also have an intel Mobo, would I still be able to use Nvidia Cards?
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a b U Graphics card
June 29, 2012 2:30:35 AM

Absolutely.

And for a 1680x1050 screen the best would be a 6870 or GTX560 ti

Personally I have a 1280x1024 panel and the 6870 can MAX any/everything while keeping above 30fps. If you prefer a higher ceiling, I would reccomend a 7850 or 7870, they also use very little power and would be suitable given your sub 500W PSU.

I would NOT recommend the old Fermi Nvidia GPU's (GTX480) on a 450W coupled with an elderly quad core as you may overdraw your PSU and kill it.
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Anonymous
a c 117 U Graphics card
June 29, 2012 2:31:43 AM

spankyc said:
I also have an intel Mobo, would I still be able to use Nvidia Cards?

having an itel motherboard or AMD motherboard does not matter what video card you have. i mean there is no compatibility difference between any manufacturer.
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June 29, 2012 2:32:56 AM

Anonymous said:
having an itel motherboard or AMD motherboard does not matter what video card you have. i mean there is no compatibility difference between any manufacturer.

Oh ok that was the only reason I didn't go with Nvidia the first time. I thought my board would only support AMD cards. Thanks for the info :D . In your opinion, which card would be the best for my setup? My price range is $100-$200
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June 29, 2012 2:35:27 AM

Anonymous said:
having an itel motherboard or AMD motherboard does not matter what video card you have. i mean there is no compatibility difference between any manufacturer.

Oh ok that was the only reason I didn't go with Nvidia the first time. I thought my board would only support AMD cards. Thanks for the info :D . In your opinion, which card would be the best for my setup? My price range is $100-$200
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Anonymous
a c 117 U Graphics card
June 29, 2012 2:39:35 AM

spankyc said:
Oh ok that was the only reason I didn't go with Nvidia the first time. I thought my board would only support AMD cards. Thanks for the info :D . In your opinion, which card would be the best for my setup? My price range is $100-$200

hey call it my eyes are failing with old age, but i see the 450 is an antec PSU, you should be able to run most any single card set up but, like what posted before, the 480.
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June 29, 2012 2:42:58 AM

Anonymous said:
hey call it my eyes are failing with old age, but i see the 450 is an antec PSU, you should be able to run most any single card set up but, like what posted before, the 480.

Lol are Antecs supposed to be good? I just picked it up at Staples because I needed a new PSU :p  So the 480 is good?
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Anonymous
a c 117 U Graphics card
June 29, 2012 2:45:29 AM

spankyc said:
Lol are Antecs supposed to be good? I just picked it up at Staples because I needed a new PSU :p  So the 480 is good?

you can't run a 480 . .they are good but power hogs and it will be like putting a small oven in your case.

antec is a highly recommended PSU.
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June 29, 2012 2:48:30 AM

Anonymous said:
you can't run a 480 . .they are good but power hogs and it will be like putting a small oven in your case.

antec is a highly recommended PSU.

Sorry didn't realize you said everything but the 480 my bad
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Anonymous
a c 117 U Graphics card
June 29, 2012 2:50:18 AM

no worries
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June 29, 2012 3:00:02 AM

One last question, would I be able to run the 580? I was on GeForce's site and it said the 580 was the fastest GeForce they had and I am very interested in that.
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June 29, 2012 3:02:01 AM

Scratch that last post, just looked it up on newegg XD
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June 29, 2012 3:10:47 AM

teh_gerbil said:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

I don't know your GPU, but if looniam can vouch for it, at 200 bucks, the above link s the absolute best value for money at the moment.

You said earlier that you would not recommend the old Fermi 480's. Is the above GPU an older fermi or would it be safe my pc? I noticed it had a super fast core clock speed.
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Anonymous
a c 117 U Graphics card
June 29, 2012 3:11:49 AM

spankyc said:
Scratch that last post, just looked it up on newegg XD

the 570 is pretty much the limit of performance for your Q6600 and even then on some CPU intensive games like BF3 multiplayer maps, skyrim and metro 2033; you cpu will be getting a load from the game and that will affect its performance with the graphics card. not a bottleneck per se; but a limtation of the cpu.

if you have a P35/45 chipset you can overclock that cpu quite high with a good cooler. a G41 chipset will get a decent overclock but not nearly as high.
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a b U Graphics card
June 29, 2012 3:21:49 AM

According to this
http://www.thermaltake.outervision.com/Power

You will need 548W to power a GTX 460
You will need 433W to power an ATI HD6870

Plus, it's within your price range and allows you spare cash (170 for card, so 30 odd) for a CPU cooler to allow you to overclock!
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a b U Graphics card
June 29, 2012 3:35:06 AM

On a 450w PSU, you might want to stick to the 7000 line to leave room for expansion and PSU aging. The 7770 (~$130) performs about like a 6850, and would give you good fps at high, but not max settings in most games at that resolution. The 7850 would max out everything in existence on your monitor, but is $250 (XFX does have one on newegg for $220 after mail-in).

WTB 7790 or 7830. For srs.

good luck!
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Anonymous
a c 117 U Graphics card
June 29, 2012 3:42:57 AM

teh_gerbil said:
According to this
http://www.thermaltake.outervision.com/Power

You will need 548W to power a GTX 460
You will need 433W to power an ATI HD6870

Plus, it's within your price range and allows you spare cash (170 for card, so 30 odd) for a CPU cooler to allow you to overclock!

this is why you ought not use online calculators:

it is recommending 100 more watts for a GPU that uses LESS power :( 
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a b U Graphics card
June 29, 2012 4:11:45 AM

POWER: It depends on the specific PSU model you are using. Can you link it? As said earlier, as it's an Antec I assume you'll be fine up to a GTX 570. If it were a Corsair, you'd be fine up to a GTX 560Ti. This is merely because of the specifics of the two PSU models I have in mind and precisely why we need the exact model.


CPU: You've gotten a lot of misleading information on this. People have been saying that your CPU will match or overpower a graphics card and it's just not really getting to the point at hand, which looniam has given some advice on--most games will run great with a Q6600, but a couple will be CPU limited.

It entirely depends on the specific title, but the ones he listed are especially hard on CPUs. Some games are programmed such that a 4GHz Dual core in the world would struggle, but a 2.4GHz Quad would not. Others are the opposite and some, such as Source Engine games like Portal 2, could run great on a Pentium 4.

Because so many of the most popular games that you'd be able to play with a new graphics card are CPU intensive, I STRONGLY suggest you look into overclocking your Q6600. I've had very little trouble overclocking the one I've used to 3.0GHz on stock voltage. If you have a decent motherboard and cooling, you can go higher.

PLEASE post a new thread on overclocking your Q6600 and link it here. You'll want to pick up something like a Hyper 212+ for $15 when it goes on sale with a rebate. Just make sure it'll fit in your case first. You can transfer this cooler to a new computer in a year or two.


GRAPHICS: Once you start talking about high end graphics, there are diminishing returns on performance/dollar. For example, a GTX 580 provides about a 33% performance improvement on the 6870 for over double it's price: http://www.anandtech.com/bench/GPU12/372
If you're using a 6670, I say just get a 6870 and be blown away by the performance. I personally own a GTX 570--but that's only because I got it for $200.
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a b U Graphics card
June 29, 2012 4:15:06 AM

FYI, I meant GTX480 as per my link to the cut price 200 dollar model, that DOES use 100W extra.....
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a b U Graphics card
June 29, 2012 4:21:04 AM

Max load system power consumption:

Core 2 q6600: 105w (more if you overclock it)
Motherboard + RAM: ~50w
case/cpu fans: 5w each (guessing 15w total)
HDD: 30w
Optical: 25w
6870: 163w

total: 388w.

For maximum efficiency on a PSU, you want to stay between 50% and 75% load. Staying under 75% rated wattage is for safety as well. The PSU loses wattage as it ages, and system power draw can sometimes spike above the numbers presented here.

For a 450w PSU, you want to stay under 338 watts at max load, which would be difficult to do outside of the 7000 line.
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Anonymous
a c 117 U Graphics card
June 29, 2012 4:25:09 AM

quilciri said:
You should use the maximum chart from techpower up, not peak.

http://www.techpowerup.com/reviews/HIS/Radeon_HD_6870/2...

that reports 163w for the 6870.

a system will never hit maximum except for once in awhile if someone stress tests their system. peak is much more appropriate to reflect the expect use when gaming.

so no you should not use the maximum chart.
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a b U Graphics card
June 29, 2012 4:29:59 AM

Anonymous said:
a system will never hit maximum except for once in awhile if someone stress tests their system. peak is much more appropriate to reflect the expect use when gaming.

so no you should not use the maximum chart.


If you're trying to gauge usual usage no. But we're trying to determine a PSU's capability based on safety and efficiency. So using the maximum possible power draw is a much safer method.
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a b U Graphics card
June 29, 2012 4:32:22 AM

Even considering the 127w peak usage, the system would still be over 75% load on a 450w.
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Anonymous
a c 117 U Graphics card
June 29, 2012 4:35:22 AM

quilciri said:
Max load system power consumption:

Core 2 q6600: 105w (more if you overclock it)
Motherboard + RAM: ~50w
case/cpu fans: 5w each (guessing 15w total)
HDD: 30w
Optical: 25w
6870: 163w

total: 388w.

For maximum efficiency on a PSU, you want to stay between 50% and 75% load. Staying under 75% rated wattage is for safety as well. The PSU loses wattage as it ages, and system power draw can sometimes spike above the numbers presented here.

For a 450w PSU, you want to stay under 338 watts at max load, which would be difficult to do outside of the 7000 line.

truly i do not mean to pick on you :
a motherbaord uses about 15 watts a stick of ram 8 watts each not 50 watts total more like 31.
a hard drive uses 10 watts to spin up but after that 5 watts.
optical is 8 watts; c'mon its only using a weak laser and spinning a dvd.

also a PSU does not lose wattage with age. cheaper low quality PSUs can lose efficiency but not wattage, that will remain constant until it fails. any capacitor aging garbage is complete mularky.
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a b U Graphics card
June 29, 2012 4:58:40 AM

quilciri said:
Even considering the 127w peak usage, the system would still be over 75% load on a 450w.
There's absolutely nothing wrong with peaking over 75% power. Now you don't want to regularly have 6 hour gaming sessions at 80% usage, but typical 75% usage with peaks to 90% of deliverable power is perfectly fine for a PSU and what it's designed to do.
Anonymous said:
truly i do not mean to pick on you :
a motherbaord uses about 15 watts a stick of ram 8 watts each not 50 watts total more like 31.
a hard drive uses 10 watts to spin up but after that 5 watts.
optical is 8 watts; c'mon its only using a weak laser and spinning a dvd.

also a PSU does not lose wattage with age. cheaper low quality PSUs can lose efficiency but not wattage, that will remain constant until it fails. any capacitor aging garbage is complete mularky.
Thank you for setting the record straight.

I suppose if you have 5 HDDs, you may want to allow 30W for them. Other than that, your numbers are pretty accurate. An Antec 450W can handle a moderately overclocked Q6600 and 6870 no problem.
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Anonymous
a c 117 U Graphics card
June 29, 2012 5:25:36 AM

dalauder said:
There's absolutely nothing wrong with peaking over 75% power. Now you don't want to regularly have 6 hour gaming sessions at 80% usage, but typical 75% usage with peaks to 90% of deliverable power is perfectly fine for a PSU and what it's designed to do.
Thank you for setting the record straight.

I suppose if you have 5 HDDs, you may want to allow 30W for them. Other than that, your numbers are pretty accurate. An Antec 450W can handle a moderately overclocked Q6600 and 6870 no problem.


i just looked at the staples site and they sell the Antec VP 450W. i was looking at the BP 450 that has more on the 12 volt rails (22 each as opposed to 18 each for the VP)
the 6870 would be better and the 570 would be too much.

i am still waiting for the "you need 650 watts PSU for that" crowd to walk in . . :p 
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a b U Graphics card
June 29, 2012 5:40:22 AM

Haha...someone often throws crazy numbers like that out. A guy at work bought a 1000W PSU for his E6600 and GTX 460 768MB. It's a Kingwin, so it's probably not a total lemon, just not a PSU I'd buy.

I bet it could handle the 570 just fine. That said, I don't recommend it. I'd stick to any graphics card with a single 6-pin connector. So GTX 560 or 6870 are about as powerful as you get unless a 7850 drops into your price range. I'd say this PSU is a bit overrated as it says 360W on the +12V rails. By my count, I'd only call this a 400W PSU.
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a b U Graphics card
June 29, 2012 4:21:06 PM

...I'm not suggesting he buy a psu that big. I'm suggesting he use a less power hungry video card to stay in a 450w PSU maximum efficiency range. You think that's crazy?

Those are peak usage numbers from various sites, including tom's hardware. They seem to be pretty close to one another, and to the max usage numbers I posted. (tom's would actually calculate the max usage higher than I did)

http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/power-supply-protec...
http://www.pctechbytes.com/hardware/computer-power-coms...
http://www.pcpower.com/technology/power_usage/

Why is it you think the max usage is so much lower?
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a b U Graphics card
June 29, 2012 4:45:39 PM

Also I didn't say the PSU loses wattage over time. I'm not telling you what will happen. I'm Erring on the side of caution here. Knowing the particular model of Antec would help. Some are better able to handle higher % loads for a long time than others.

Actually, there's an old thread here now that I'm looking >.< the replies help more than the OP.
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/300392-28-capacitor-a...

Most PSU's I've put in systems have deliverd rated power for long after some sites (the ones that claim a psu loses 5-10% efficiency a year) say they should fail.

However, Relying solely on anecdotal evidence is a path to failure, IMO.
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a b U Graphics card
July 1, 2012 11:24:34 PM

quilciri said:
...I'm not suggesting he buy a psu that big. I'm suggesting he use a less power hungry video card to stay in a 450w PSU maximum efficiency range. You think that's crazy?

Those are peak usage numbers from various sites, including tom's hardware. They seem to be pretty close to one another, and to the max usage numbers I posted. (tom's would actually calculate the max usage higher than I did)

http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/power-supply-protec...
http://www.pctechbytes.com/hardware/computer-power-coms...
http://www.pcpower.com/technology/power_usage/

Why is it you think the max usage is so much lower?
Oh no, I wasn't saying your numbers were crazy. I was saying the 650W PSU looniam was joking about would be crazy. Nothing you've said has been ludicrous, merely overly conservative. I've been in threads where people get to talking about an 850W PSU for this guy--that would be crazy.

As far as this PSU with a 6870--I'm not talking about being right at the limit. I'm talking about something safe that still has some headroom:
Ivy i5 = ~110W when OC'd
6870 = 151W max (per Wikipedia
Everything Else = ~80W
TOTAL = ~340W

Realistically, you'll probably only see total system draw that high when overclocked while gaming or other intensive tasks. That's well under the 400W I credit the PSU with providing. Chances are, it'll be more like 270W while gaming and, if I'm wrong by 20W on one of those estimates, the PSU has plenty headroom left--especially if you credit it as a 450W PSU.

As far as my sources...that PCtechbytes website is horrendously out-of-date. Note that it lists Pentium III (circa Y2K) power draw. No SATA HDD from the last 5 years draws close to 20W. In fact, I'm not even sure HDDs from 2000 drew 20W. The same goes for that PCPower website. Most HDDs will stay well under 10W under max load: http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/4tb-3tb-hdd,3183-15...

I guess I don't really have an explanation for why the Tom's numbers were so odd on the page you linked. Anyhow...5 minutes ago, I ran Furmark (GPU w/ some CPU) and LinX (HEAVY CPU) simultaneously with my i7-2600K @ 4.5GHz + SLI'd GTS 250's (although one GTS 250 idles during Furmark), I hit 404W draw from the wall socket (via my Kill-A-Watt). If I assume 85% efficiency, then it's at 343W usage, which is very similar to what I suggest above. My i7-2600K (Sandy Bridge) will use more power than his Ivy i5 ever will. And a GTS 250 has almost identical load draw to a 6870--although the idling one wastes about ~40W (old and inefficient low power mode).

I would run this same i7-2600K w/ a single GTS 250 setup on a Corsair CX430 or Antec VP450.
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a b U Graphics card
July 1, 2012 11:32:04 PM

quilciri said:
Also I didn't say the PSU loses wattage over time. I'm not telling you what will happen. I'm Erring on the side of caution here. Knowing the particular model of Antec would help. Some are better able to handle higher % loads for a long time than others.

Actually, there's an old thread here now that I'm looking >.< the replies help more than the OP.
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/300392-28-capacitor-a...

Most PSU's I've put in systems have deliverd rated power for long after some sites (the ones that claim a psu loses 5-10% efficiency a year) say they should fail.

However, Relying solely on anecdotal evidence is a path to failure, IMO.
Yes, I've heard "capacitor aging" as well. And I'm nearly certain I've read that thread you linked. I've discussed this with some people who know more than me about the idea behind that. Apparently, the original non-broken logic (as losing 10% capacity per year doesn't make sense) is that capacitors in high heat increases the chance for a capacitor to fail--so the more time you have your PSU getting really hot (e.g. under really heavy load), the greater chance you have of blowing a cap and the unit failing.

So really you want to leave some headroom between typical heavy usage (such as gaming) and the total capacity. So you'd want to only hit 75% during typical heavy gaming (try the Metro 2033 benchmark) with brief spikes to 90% or so. That should keep your PSU within normal operating temperatures so long as your case has decent air flow.

At least that's my take on it--and it least it sounds logical (let me know if you have more info if that interpretation sounds wrong).
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a b U Graphics card
July 4, 2012 11:22:20 PM

FYI: I just checked my i7-2600K (@ 4.5GHz) + my GTX 570 (light OC) on a Kombustor (Furmark) + Linx simultaneous run. That gets 415W max from the wall, which should be about 353W from the PSU. So I'd expect a CX430 or VP450 to handle it, not that I'd recommend it.

Anyhow, a CX430 w/ Ivy Bridge i5 and 6870 should be just fine.
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Anonymous
a c 117 U Graphics card
July 7, 2012 1:50:50 AM

yes it will.
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a b U Graphics card
July 8, 2012 11:14:05 PM

spankyc said:
Alright guys, I need help one last time. Newegg has this card http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... and I was wondering if it fits my computer specs.
It'll "fit", but I'd definitely take one of those 6870's when they go on sale for $130 instead. It's not a typicaly 336 core GTX 560. It's a cut-down 288 core "SE" version--just so you don't get surprised. So that's about a 15% performance hit (assuming the same clock rates, which might not be the case).
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a b U Graphics card
July 16, 2012 3:34:14 AM

I'm gonna assume this thread is dead. OP, PM me if you come back.
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!