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Hyperthreading?

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January 2, 2013 1:54:42 AM

Hello, I am building my first gaming rig, and I'd like to know if hyper-threading on intel processors is worth it.

I want to get 3570k and OC because of budget but only i3 and i7 have hyper-threading support. I don't want to go with an i3 because of reasons.

So, is it worth the extra cash for an i7 just for hyper-threading?

mobo: GIGABYTE GA-Z77X-UD3H
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
PSU: EVGA SuperNOVA NEX750B
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
GPU: 2x EVGA SuperClocked 02G-P4-3662-KR GeForce GTX 660 Ti
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

More about : hyperthreading

a b à CPUs
January 2, 2013 2:31:55 AM

If your using regular applications, then hyperthreading provides about a 20% speed boost. It's of no value for games.
a c 179 à CPUs
January 2, 2013 6:17:35 AM

FALC0N said:
If your using regular applications, then hyperthreading provides about a 20% speed boost. It's of no value for games.


More or less..

QUICK ANSWER:
Get the i5-3570K CPU.

SIDE NOTE:
*Haswell isn't out until roughly JUNE 2013 but some neat info has arrived:
- huge jump in power savings, especially in Idle
- overclocking features normally on motherboard being incorporated into CPU
- up to 3x iGPU boost (iGPU is finding a niche even for gamers who transcode)
- possibly improved addon graphics card shutdown to save power
- other Motherboard power saving features (confirmed)
- possibly further improved boot times
(a really, really cool feature is for laptops/tables though it MAY be there physically once desktop monitors add this feature. The CPU/GPU can shut down in milli/micro? seconds. So every spare moment nothing on the screen is updated the PC can sht down almost completely. This is achieved by the monitor having its own internal buffer for one screen image. The monitor just loops the small video buffer and tells the PC it can shut down. You can then SCROLL down the screen to read more, during which the PC starts the basic elements long enough for that task then shut down again.)

LONG ANSWER:
There has been very minor benefit to some games but generally it's quite limited. What is NOT CERTAIN is whether game engines can make use of this in the near future, such as the Unreal 4 engine.

There are two ways that the $100 or so can be spent for better performance elsewhere though:
1) RAM:
2133MHz vs 1600MHz has benefitted a few games now and will improve in the future (one game in particular improved by 15% at times).
*8GB DDR3 2133MHz is the max amount and frequency that will benefit a high-end machine.

2) GRAPHICS CARD:
Upgrading to a better graphics card will have a bigger boost usually than upgrading from 1600MHz to 2133MH of DDR3.

Hyper-Threading and real-world benefits:
a) Backing up C-Drive using a tool like Acronis True Image (free version from WD or Seagate if you have an Internal or USB drive from them).
*I hit 100% in all eight threads of my i7-3770K reducing time by perhaps 20%, though likely slower during phases that may not benefit.)

b) Video Edit or Conversion:
*Conversion CAN use all eight threads at times. Hardware decoding will mitigate the advantage here, and certain plugins aren't optimized.
**If you EDIT VIDEO (not just convert) then the AMOUNT of RAM is probably more important than having hyperthreading, or even the FREQUENCY

SUMMARY:
- Hyperthreading is generally a waste for most games
- Hyperthreading MAY benefit games in the future
- Upgrading RAM to 2133MHz, and/or graphics upgrade are better
- Hyperthreading can benefit transcoding, compression and similar tasks up to 20% at times

*Unless you intend to use a utility like Handbrake a fair amount I really can't recommend the cost difference for most people. There's better places to spend the money.
Related resources
a c 82 à CPUs
January 2, 2013 6:31:46 AM

I'd adjust your build to have a 680 (or even a 670) and not two 660ti's in SLI.

SLI has microstuttering issues, no solution yet. You do not get double the VRAM. You do not get great driver support, drivers are often coming out with updates weeks-months after a game is released. You'll get more bandwidth to your vram.

You would get good results but be more stable. And then you could have the i7.
January 2, 2013 8:50:08 AM

If there is no other purpose to your PC besides gaming than you'll be ok with the 3570k, focus your money on nice cooling for your processor, clock speeds are more important when it comes to gaming performance. Also 13thmonkey is right about getting a single card, instead of two 660 ti's. Not all games support sli and the ones that do may or may not have issues with it. 1 680 is all you need for 99% of games out there right now. also for ram focus on the latency rather than the actual frequency its running at.
a c 179 à CPUs
January 2, 2013 9:03:59 AM

13thmonkey said:
I'd adjust your build to have a 680 (or even a 670) and not two 660ti's in SLI.

SLI has microstuttering issues, no solution yet. You do not get double the VRAM. You do not get great driver support, drivers are often coming out with updates weeks-months after a game is released. You'll get more bandwidth to your vram.

You would get good results but be more stable. And then you could have the i7.


You are absolutely correct about micro-stutter.
I've almost given up trying to expain this because I keep getting FLAMED like I don't know what I'm talking about.

The following is what I STRONGLY recommend he build:
(I didn't provide links. If you'd like help with the entire build I'd be happy too. I've got time off. I've built well over 100 systems.)

1. Graphics Card:
Asus GTX 680 DC2T
*make sure it's "DC2T" and not the "DC2" version.
**Some should currently have game coupons.

2. CPU:
Intel i3-3570K

3. RAM:
8GB DDR3 1600MH, G. Skill (optionally 2133MHz)

4. OS:
Windows 8 64-bit OEM
*Get Stardock's Start8 ($5) to replace Start Menu
(Please, no W7 vs W8 discussion here unless he asks.. )

5. SSD/HDD
Example->
a) 120GB SSD for Windows/apps
b) 2TB HDD for Steam games folder, Media, Downloads and SSD backup Image (Acronis True Image free verion etc)
*Steam now supports more than one folder!
**Game launching times on HDD vs SSD aren't as significant as many think, but let's leave it there.

6. Motherboard:
1155/Z77 (Asus/Gigabyte/Asrock)
*several choices exist

Other TIPS:
- choose CPU HSF carefully; you want a 4-pin PWM fan and many still use 3-pin VOLTAGE (or your fan is stuck at 100% speed)
- Z77 Sabertooth Asus motherboard has a 5-year Warranty. *It's very important to note that you need to install the AI SUITE II software then set the ASSIST FANS so they turn OFF unti the temperature hits say 45degC; otherwise they spin needlessly and whine noticeably in a quiet room.
- some boards probably have a CREATIVE audio chip rather than Realtek. Realtek is "okay" but not good enough for me. You can also add an addon sound card of course but a reasonably good one is about $100 or so (Auzentech X-Fi Forte).

SUMMARY:
I've been using the Asus 680 "TOP" card for a few months now and it's truly awesome. It's three slots, however the backplage and three screws mount it solidly; no fear of bending.

The Z77/1155 is the gamers choice for motherboards.

The i5-3570K is the recommended gamers CPU.
The i7-3770K details are in another post.
a b à CPUs
January 2, 2013 9:18:04 AM

Sorry cant do it.

Above specs look very good but you need to be informed about the differences between W7 and W8.
I'm not going to go into pro's and con's but will just recommend that you get a download of the trial version of W8 and try that first before you decide if you want to use it for your new system or not.

Mactronix :) 
January 3, 2013 7:00:41 PM

Thank you everybody, this has been extremely helpful. I will be going eith the 3570K thanks to your suggestions.

Have a nice day!
November 24, 2013 7:43:51 PM

Hyper-threading is a cool feature to have. In all CPUs, each core has its own execution engine. The execution engine controls the L"x" cache, and thread traffic (including returns and request). In a hyper-threaded core, the execution engine shares resources and controls thread traffic independently for two logical processors. Hyper-threading has a great deal in common with a multi core processor, its usefulness depends on the operating system and the program that will use them. Most programs are simple and are only written to use one core. But some programs and games are very complex and demanding, and are written to fully utilize hyper-threading or any number of cores they have excess to. Windows 7 and 8 are very hyper-threading and multi core processor friendly, Vista XP and 98 use this extra resource poorly. For Windows 7 and 8, I recommend the use of at least a 2 core processor; these operating system will free up one core by running background programs in the second core. If you have Windows 7 and 8 and run mostly simple programs, you will see little to no difference between a 2 core 3.2 gigahertz CPU, and an 8 core 3.2 gigahertz CPU. If you are a gamer or power user, you most likely will make good use of the extra cores/processors. The simple answer to your question is; look to see if what you use the computer for, will make use of the extra resources.
!