I5 5400 "s" vs I5 3470, a bit or big difference?

Hi to everobody, I´ve a simple question... my actual pc (home use, internet, non-gaming) is a intel I5 5400 "S" (2.5ghz) in B75 mobo with 4 Gb ram ddr3 1333mhz. Is a good idea replacing the cpu for i5 3470 (3.2ghz) and put 8 gb ram ddr3 1600mhz? Really I feel the difference with this change in the everyday use???
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More about 5400 3470 difference
  1. foreste said:
    Hi to everobody, I´ve a simple question... my actual pc (home use, internet, non-gaming) is a intel I5 5400 "S" (2.5ghz) in B75 mobo with 4 Gb ram ddr3 1333mhz. Is a good idea replacing the cpu for i5 3470 (3.2ghz) and put 8 gb ram ddr3 1600mhz? Really I feel the difference with this change in the everyday use???


    There really won't be much of a difference between a Sandy Bridges I5 an Ivy Bridges I5. For real world performance you won't really notice much of a performance increase.
  2. a 5400s?

    in day to day things, you won't really see a difference in performance. For gaming though, you'll see an improvement and if your oc it, more so.

    Yes SB are almost on par with IB's regarding performance par, but it depends on the model. Like 2500 = i5 3750k...but comparing the older slower SB's to new IB, there will be differences.
  3. koreanzombie said:
    a 5400s?

    in day to day things, you won't really see a difference in performance. For gaming though, you'll see an improvement and if your oc it, more so.

    Yes SB are almost on par with IB's regarding performance par, but it depends on the model. Like 2500 = i5 3750k...but comparing the older slower SB's to new IB, there will be differences.


    First of all non "k" versions of Intel procesors can not be overclocked. You can increase the FSB but you will get maybe 100-200 MHz increase that really is not an overclock and will make no noticable difference in performance. Secondly there is not much of a difference between Sandy Bridges and Ivy Bridges to begin with. The main difference is the Ivy Bridges is smaller, has better integrated graphics and clocked a few hundred MHz higher. So comparing two non "k" stock I5's there will not be a noticable real world performance difference. Even in "k" versions the I5 3750k is not much better than a 2500k.
  4. foreste said:
    Hi to everobody, I´ve a simple question... my actual pc (home use, internet, non-gaming) is a intel I5 5400 "S" (2.5ghz) in B75 mobo with 4 Gb ram ddr3 1333mhz.


    There is no such CPU called an i5-5400s.

    Based on Intel's naming convention, the 1st number after the CPU family (i5) is the generation. The next three number indicates the performance level. The i5-5400s would indicate the 5th generation. The current Core i series is only up to the 3rd generation as in the Ivy Bridge Core i5-3470.

    Haswell will be Intel's 4th generation Core i CPU series and it will be released this year. It will have model numbers like Core i5-4570.

    Broadwell will be Intel's 5th generation Core i CPU series and it will be released next year; perhaps summer or fall. It is still under development

    Therefore, if you truly have an Intel i5-5400s CPU then I would hold on to it because more models of it will not be released until next year and Broadwell will likely have "monster performance".
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