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Is this a good, future proof PC

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  • Systems
Last response: in Systems
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August 18, 2012 9:21:18 PM

CPU: i5 2500 (3.3)
motherboard: asus p8z68-v-lx
GPU: nvidai gtx zotac 560 1g (might upgrade later)
PSU: FSP 600 watt 80 plus
Cooling: titan cooler, 2x200mm fans, 1x120mm fan
RAM: 8GB 1333 Samsung ram
HD: 2xwestern digital 500GB
Case: CM storm enforcer
Mouse:trust gaming mouse
keyboard: compucessory keyboard (upgrading soon)
Screen : Novatech 22inch LED display
Headphones: AKG K450

More about : good future proof

August 18, 2012 9:36:30 PM

If you don't want to overclock that looks fine. I'm not sure about the motherboard, its stated as discontinued. I like Asrock they have the new z77 models and they are more future proof.

Replace one of the Hdd with an SSD preferably a 128gb Crucial M4, for the OS and most applications. Keep the one 500GB HD for other programs.
August 18, 2012 9:52:55 PM

There's no such thing as a future proof PC. Just buy whatever you need at the time.

It's much better to buy 2 cheaper computers every 2-3 years than a single expensive computer every 5 years. That, or upgrade internals piece by piece.

If you want to leave room for easy upgrades I would buy a good sized case with a powerful PSU, and possibly a motherboard that supports SLI and a cpu that can be overclocked.
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August 18, 2012 10:00:04 PM

What is your budget right now? My pc last year that I built cost about 800+ at the time because I added a monitor since I didn't have one at all.

This is what mine consisted of:

Roswell Challenger

Asrock Z68 Extreme3 Gen3

1TB hard drive---> Later that year, close to 2012 I bought a 128Gb SSD

MSI Twin Frozr II 560Ti 1gb----> Replacing this right now with a 670 or Amd 7970 if the AMd fits the case (doubt it)

8GB Corsair Vengence Ram 1600

Corsair 750w Enthusiast PSU

Core i5 2500k---> Thinking of getting a hyper 212+ to overclock this

LiteOn dvd writer---> No need to replace this for my needs

Not sure where you are from but I saved money going with bundles from newegg such as Cpu+Ram, hdd+videocard, so on. You can save on shipping that way too.
August 18, 2012 10:05:19 PM

Just as ehanger says, even if you buy top of the line components, they'll become midrange in a year and they'll be competing with budget parts in two. However, knowing how few PC games these days push the envelope in graphics, that setup will probably last 2 maybe 3 years and a lot longer if you don't game (but judging from your GPU you will use it to game).
August 18, 2012 10:30:56 PM

selayan said:
What is your budget right now? My pc last year that I built cost about 800+ at the time because I added a monitor since I didn't have one at all.

This is what mine consisted of:

Roswell Challenger

Asrock Z68 Extreme3 Gen3

1TB hard drive---> Later that year, close to 2012 I bought a 128Gb SSD

MSI Twin Frozr II 560Ti 1gb----> Replacing this right now with a 670 or Amd 7970 if the AMd fits the case (doubt it)

8GB Corsair Vengence Ram 1600

Corsair 750w Enthusiast PSU

Core i5 2500k---> Thinking of getting a hyper 212+ to overclock this

LiteOn dvd writer---> No need to replace this for my needs

Not sure where you are from but I saved money going with bundles from newegg such as Cpu+Ram, hdd+videocard, so on. You can save on shipping that way too.



budget is 600 pounds
August 18, 2012 10:37:30 PM

ehanger said:
There's no such thing as a future proof PC. Just buy whatever you need at the time.

It's much better to buy 2 cheaper computers every 2-3 years than a single expensive computer every 5 years. That, or upgrade internals piece by piece.

If you want to leave room for easy upgrades I would buy a good sized case with a powerful PSU, and possibly a motherboard that supports SLI and a cpu that can be overclocked.



i have 600wat psu, is that good enough for most components, also my motherboard does not support sli, however i prefer a single card over two. but it supports crossfire.
August 18, 2012 10:43:19 PM

You should be ok with 600w. I'm not sure what the equivalent of newegg in the UK or where you are ordering from. But some other members here may be able to chime in on that.
August 18, 2012 11:16:08 PM

bgrt said:
Just as ehanger says, even if you buy top of the line components, they'll become midrange in a year and they'll be competing with budget parts in two. However, knowing how few PC games these days push the envelope in graphics, that setup will probably last 2 maybe 3 years and a lot longer if you don't game (but judging from your GPU you will use it to game).



in 3 years, should i upgrade my components or get a new pc, if i should upgrade, which components should i upgrade.
August 18, 2012 11:35:11 PM

The main components..CPU, GPU, Power supply, and maybe motherboard.
August 18, 2012 11:37:48 PM

selayan said:
The main components..CPU, GPU, Power supply, and maybe motherboard.


OK, but for the next couple of years, they are good enough, no point spending tons on new components if you are not going to use there full potential. Also could my PC run bf3 and on what settings. also how easy is the psu to replace?
August 18, 2012 11:54:32 PM

The power supply is as simple to replace as it was putting it in. You just disconnect all the cables from the components, pull out the wires, unscrew the psu from the case and put the new one in.

As for Bf3 you should be able to run it online with medium settings. Single player maybe high. Is the graphics card you are getting a 560Ti or just a regular 560?

The 560Ti will let you run BF3 high-medium online at a resolution of 1920x1080 in multiplayer online and on ultra in single player mode.
August 19, 2012 12:12:30 AM

selayan said:
The power supply is as simple to replace as it was putting it in. You just disconnect all the cables from the components, pull out the wires, unscrew the psu from the case and put the new one in.

As for Bf3 you should be able to run it online with medium settings. Single player maybe high. Is the graphics card you are getting a 560Ti or just a regular 560?

The 560Ti will let you run BF3 high-medium online at a resolution of 1920x1080 in multiplayer online and on ultra in single player mode.


no ive got a 560 not 560 ti, anyway in a year or 2 i might replace it, i dont game much on my pc, i mostly use my ps3 for that.
August 19, 2012 12:28:14 AM

You should be fine with the regular 560. I have my ps3 too but I prefer pc games. Don't expect crazy frame rates on Bf3, it will be playable and you may need to turn down some AA /FSAA, blur effect, and shadows but you will be ok.
August 19, 2012 12:39:44 AM

selayan said:
You should be fine with the regular 560. I have my ps3 too but I prefer pc games. Don't expect crazy frame rates on Bf3, it will be playable and you may need to turn down some AA /FSAA, blur effect, and shadows but you will be ok.



ok, but if i do go into pc gaming, i will most likely get a gtx 670. however i prefer ps3 gaming because you don't have to spend tons of money upgrading to p lay the latest games. but i don't get as good fps or graphics. but 560 is good for now.
August 19, 2012 12:51:00 AM

Yeh when I got bored of the ps3 because others were watching too much tv I got more into my pc. You will be fine and by the time you want to upgrade you most likely will change more parts so it won't be so bad because you could sell your old parts for some money.
August 19, 2012 7:14:10 AM

selayan said:
Yeh when I got bored of the ps3 because others were watching too much tv I got more into my pc. You will be fine and by the time you want to upgrade you most likely will change more parts so it won't be so bad because you could sell your old parts for some money.


ok, thanks
August 19, 2012 9:23:41 PM

oh, and one quick question,

my motherboard runs x16x4 crossfire, what does this mean and will this affect my performance if i get crossfire.
August 19, 2012 9:47:42 PM

Means one PCI slot runs at x16 the other one runs at x4. If you want to do crossfire then you need two of the same Amd cards connected with the Crossfire bridge. So when they sync I believe they both would run at x8. Not sure though because I've never done crossfire or SLI.
August 19, 2012 9:56:51 PM

selayan said:
Means one PCI slot runs at x16 the other one runs at x4. If you want to do crossfire then you need two of the same Amd cards connected with the Crossfire bridge. So when they sync I believe they both would run at x8. Not sure though because I've never done crossfire or SLI.



do you recommend just using one powerful card instead of two
August 19, 2012 10:00:28 PM

Yes, I think one powerful card is better than two. One reason is you save money in the long run. Another is, some issues can happen in terms of drivers and things when using SLI or Crossfire. Crossfire has issues with the Amd drivers running two cards.

In SLI sometimes there is some performance issues when using two cards in Nvidia side.

I would go with one card, and later if the card drops to lower prices where you can afford it and you don't want to upgrade, get another and try it out.
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