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Check How Many Watts I Need

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January 3, 2013 7:10:15 AM

Is there a program or a way that I can check how many watts of power I should have for my computer? I currently have a 700W PSU but I think the company may have lied about the watts because while playing high end games, my computer shuts off randomly. I was hopping that I could find a program so I could see how many watts I need so that it will quit shutting off.

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January 3, 2013 7:35:58 AM

no, the only way to do that is to connect a voltmeter inside ur PSU. most PSU's are actually badly designed, and even if they give the right power, they dont provide the right current, so u get system crashes which can potentially burn every component in ur computer. so buy a good power supply. theres a few toms hardware guides on it.
http://www.tomshardware.co.uk/power-supply-psu-review,r...
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a c 122 ) Power supply
January 3, 2013 8:50:24 AM

Atilla280 said:
Is there a program or a way that I can check how many watts of power I should have for my computer? I currently have a 700W PSU but I think the company may have lied about the watts because while playing high end games, my computer shuts off randomly. I was hopping that I could find a program so I could see how many watts I need so that it will quit shutting off.
I am your program please list your current specs and i will tell you the cheapest best bang for buck quality option. :)  or refer to this http://www.eggxpert.com/forums/thread/323050.aspx Tier 1 provides the best quality power, great for overclocking, super high-end systems, and bragging rights. The best of the best. Very good longevity.
Tier 2 offers very good quality power output, and great reliability. Highly recommended for use in new systems.
Tier 2b contains units that almost made Tier 2, but may not have quite as good quality output(still very good), or may not last as long. Recommended for systems not expected to run 24/7 for several years.
Tier 3 power supplies fully meet all ATX requirements for power output quality, but don't have as good of power output quality as above tiers. No reason to replace one if you have one, and they're still good choices for most systems.
Tier 4 units may have some problems, such as being unable to deliver rated power at higher temperatures, or being slightly out of ATX spec on power output quality. Not recommended to buy except in situations where you will not be stressing it, or expecting it to last for more than a few years. If you have one, you can probably keep using it unless you're experiencing problems.
Tier 5 power supplies are NOT RECOMMENDED. If you have one, you should strongly consider replacing it ASAP. These can damage your computer, and often cannot put out the power that they're rated for. If a brand name is listed here, then all models from that brand name are considered to be Tier 5, except for those specific models listed above.



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January 4, 2013 8:17:18 AM

I really don't know how to check my specs. Could you please tell me. All I really know is I have a GTX 550Ti and an i7 920
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January 4, 2013 12:51:13 PM

In my unqualified opinion (meaning don't act based on anything I say) you would probably do fine with a 500w 80+ psu. That's just a guess. You aren't running 2 gpu's? You aren't running 32 gigs of mem or anything like that?
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a c 1167 ) Power supply
January 4, 2013 6:00:17 PM

For a system using a single GeForce GTX 550 Ti graphics card NVIDIA specifies a minimum of a 400 Watt or greater power supply that has a maximum combined +12 Volt continuous current rating of 24 Amps or greater and that has at least one 6-pin PCI Express supplementary power connector.

Total Power Supply Wattage is NOT the crucial factor in power supply selection!!! Sufficient Total Combined Continuous Power/Current Available on the +12V Rail(s) rated at 45°C - 50°C ambient temperature, is the most critical factor.

You may find power supplies on the market that supply more than enough Wattage to run the system. However, some of them lack Sufficient Amperage capacity on the critical +12 Volt rail, which is necessary to properly power the critical components in the system (i.e. CPU and GPUs). This is the reason why graphics card manufacturers overstate the power supply wattage, usually by at least 50 Watts, in an attempt to take into account some of those power supplies that have the weaker +12 Volt rail(s).

The Corsair Builder Series CX430 (CP-9020046-NA), with its maximum combined +12 Volt continuous current rating of 32 Amps and with one (6+2)-pin PCI Express supplementary power connectors, is more than sufficient to power your system configuration with a single GeForce GTX 550 Ti graphics card.

CORSAIR Builder Series CX430 430W ATX12V v2.3 80 PLUS BRONZE Certified Active PFC Power Supply for $44.99 ($24.99 after $20.00 rebate card if purchased between January 4, 2013 and January 10, 2013 at Newegg.com or Newegg.ca.)
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

NVIDIA uses an Intel i7-920 system in determining the recommended minimum power supply requirements for their graphics cards.

Get rid of your APEVIA ATX-CB700W.
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a c 122 ) Power supply
January 4, 2013 6:03:08 PM

ko888 said:
For a system using a single GeForce GTX 550 Ti graphics card NVIDIA specifies a minimum of a 400 Watt or greater power supply that has a maximum combined +12 Volt continuous current rating of 24 Amps or greater and that has at least one 6-pin PCI Express supplementary power connector.

Total Power Supply Wattage is NOT the crucial factor in power supply selection!!! Sufficient Total Combined Continuous Power/Current Available on the +12V Rail(s) rated at 45°C - 50°C ambient temperature, is the most critical factor.

You may find power supplies on the market that supply more than enough Wattage to run the system. However, some of them lack Sufficient Amperage capacity on the critical +12 Volt rail, which is necessary to properly power the critical components in the system (i.e. CPU and GPUs). This is the reason why graphics card manufacturers overstate the power supply wattage, usually by at least 50 Watts, in an attempt to take into account some of those power supplies that have the weaker +12 Volt rail(s).

The Corsair Builder Series CX430 (CP-9020046-NA), with its maximum combined +12 Volt continuous current rating of 32 Amps and with one (6+2)-pin PCI Express supplementary power connectors, is more than sufficient to power your system configuration with a single GeForce GTX 550 Ti graphics card.

CORSAIR Builder Series CX430 430W ATX12V v2.3 80 PLUS BRONZE Certified Active PFC Power Supply for $44.99 ($24.99 after $20.00 rebate card if purchased between January 4, 2013 and January 10, 2013 at Newegg.com or Newegg.ca.)
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

NVIDIA uses an Intel i7-920 system in determining the recommended minimum power supply requirements for their graphics cards.

Get rid of your APEVIA ATX-CB700W.
He should get a better power supply then that don't you think :lol:  what about this one http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... or http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
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a c 122 ) Power supply
January 4, 2013 6:55:59 PM

ko888 said:
A budget range wasn't specified. Looks like the OP is trying to buy at the low end of the spectrum.

Any reputable brand 350 Watt and greater PSU has got to be better than any APEVIA garbage.
Well that's true. I agree with you. :) 
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a c 122 ) Power supply
January 4, 2013 6:59:51 PM

Atilla280 said:
I really don't know how to check my specs. Could you please tell me. All I really know is I have a GTX 550Ti and an i7 920
Go for this PSU if you can afford it http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... if not go with ko888 recommendation it's as cheap as it gets. ;) 
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January 10, 2013 11:59:31 PM

Best answer selected by Atilla280.
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