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Two different graphics cards possible? Just for software

Last response: in Graphics & Displays
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June 30, 2012 2:06:02 PM

Hello all,
The computer I built a few months has a nvideo GeForce 8400 card in it. Very basic I know but I just needed it for the sake of a few ports since my motherboard doesn't have integrated graphics ports, its a P67 Extreme4 Gen3 LGA 1155 BTW. Anyway a few days ago I got SolidWorks and it always crashed when I tried to open a new file. I didn't think the graphics card would be a problem, but according to their min system requirements it is. So I bought an ATI FirePro 3D V3800, a compatible card, yesterday and am currently waiting for it to ship. Did I make a mistake? I still want to keep my old GeForce in my computer in addition to this FirePro card. I'm not interested in heavy game performance or making a crossfire/sli bridge (which isn't even possible given these are 2 different brands). I only want this card just for the sake of running SolidWorks so can someone please let me know if I'm good to go or will I find myself in a lot of pain and headache wondering why things aren't working when I try to install. Thanks.

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a b U Graphics card
June 30, 2012 3:36:52 PM

Congratulations, you have upgraded your graphics card. Your new card should be 2-3 times faster than your old card. In theory, yes, you can keep the old card and the new card in the same computer, but your new card is in all ways superior. Just install the AMD drivers and you'll be set to go. Now of course, anytime you change anything in your computer, there is a chance something will stop working, but it is far less likely to happen nowadays than it used to be. You can find several tutorials on the web about how to change a graphics card. Most of the will tell you to uninstall your graphics driver and go back to the built in VGA driver, then shut your computer down, pull out the old card, put in the new card and restart. The computer will come up using the VGA driver and you can now install the new graphics driver. This is a conservative approach (I don't bother uninstalling my old graphics driver), but leaves the least room for doubt.
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June 30, 2012 6:35:09 PM

Temile said:
Congratulations, you have upgraded your graphics card. Your new card should be 2-3 times faster than your old card. In theory, yes, you can keep the old card and the new card in the same computer, but your new card is in all ways superior. Just install the AMD drivers and you'll be set to go. Now of course, anytime you change anything in your computer, there is a chance something will stop working, but it is far less likely to happen nowadays than it used to be. You can find several tutorials on the web about how to change a graphics card. Most of the will tell you to uninstall your graphics driver and go back to the built in VGA driver, then shut your computer down, pull out the old card, put in the new card and restart. The computer will come up using the VGA driver and you can now install the new graphics driver. This is a conservative approach (I don't bother uninstalling my old graphics driver), but leaves the least room for doubt.



Interesting, I didn't know it was really that much better. The only real downside to completely replacing it is now I will lose the HDMI and VGA ports on the GeForce 8400 but no worries since I can always get a display port to HDMI cable for my monitor. I intend to remove the GeForce and keep it as a backup and install the FirePro for all my uses now. Thank you for the response and the advice on switching the card, appreciate it.
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June 30, 2012 6:35:20 PM

Best answer selected by tpizzle.
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a c 271 U Graphics card
June 30, 2012 8:08:19 PM

This topic has been closed by Mousemonkey
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